What Should I Know About Sheds?

This is a discussion on What Should I Know About Sheds? within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; consider insulating the ceiling and walls. You'll be a lot more comfortable and spend a lot less over time on heating and cooling....

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Thread: What Should I Know About Sheds?

  1. #16
    Member Array mfcmb's Avatar
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    consider insulating the ceiling and walls. You'll be a lot more comfortable and spend a lot less over time on heating and cooling.
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  3. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by DefConGun View Post
    Thanks for all the advice gasmitty ;-) I never even thought about critters and woodchucks. I'm really liking the concrete slab idea, it sounds like this might solve the critter problem also.

    Thanks for commenting about the material. I really like the A-Frame Board & Batten wooden buildings but I don't know how much that will affect cost. Also, do you think that cedar is worth the extra cost considering its reputation for offering longevity?
    Cedar's advantage is that it naturally repels insect attack, but beyond that it's no better or worse than other soft woods for longevity. You could spray your unpainted structure with Thompson's Water Seal annually for 20 years and probably still save money over using cedar... but ultimately, local costs will dictate.
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  4. #18
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    Also, if you use treated in the areas that you should, it will last just as long as cedar. Its not as nice looking, and certainly doesnt smell as nice but it will last just as long. I'd use treated where ever wood comes anywhere close to the ground, such as the box or sill plates. Standard pine will work fine for everything on up. But, depending on what you sheath the building with, you will have to seal or paint on a regular basis. I like T-111 barn siding, just rent or even buy a cheap sprayer and hit it with some sealer every other year depending on how rough the weather is. Make sure you use some good aluminum in the exposed gable ends of your roof.
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  5. #19
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    I agree about going bigger then you ever think that you will need i have a 2 car garage at the house that we are renting and its almost completely full as soon as we buy this house, i am planning a 30x30 Pole Shed with a loft up above for a room with a pool table and big screen just a place to hang out and not make the house messy

  6. #20
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    I used this kit from Northern tool. Made my life easier. I had a pad poured for mine but wish I would have added an extra 10-12 foot down one side for a covered parking area that my boat would fit under.

    Fast Framer Universal Storage Shed Framing Kit | Utility Sheds | Northern Tool + Equipment

    These kits are available at a lot of stores this one was just closest to me at the time of purchase.

  7. #21
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    Dang HOA... I swear that the fancier the neighborhood that you live in, the lower the quality of life.

    I was at my best with a little house in the woods and a shed out back. I'll get back to that someday...
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  8. #22
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    Know this! The wife will probably see a shed and automatically think it'll be a nice place to store things. I second the advice of going for as big as you can afford. Good luck!
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  9. #23
    Distinguished Member Array claude clay's Avatar
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    design it for ease of later expansion. frame a window so that it can be converted to a doorway later when you need more room.
    and keep an eye on the roof so it can match up also.
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  10. #24
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    I'd agree, wood.
    I'd put the doors on the short side so you could drive mowers and things in lengthwise.
    A friend has one big enough for a car, he uses it for tools and mowers (five acres).
    The worst part is the garage door was metal and rusted quickly.
    Keep it simple. add wiring later. If you want, you can do insulation to keep it cooler inside.
    Even a window AC.

    I wouldn't store guns in it as the security is minimal.

  11. #25
    Member Array tqu9047's Avatar
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    Finally found some pics.
    Double 2 x 4 walls at 16" OC, Hurricane ties on the rafters.
    2 x 6 joists in ceiling with well used attic above.
    Also, cement board siding.
    Workshop Pics 001.jpg
    Workshop Pics 002.jpg
    Workshop Pics 003.jpg
    Workshop Pics 004.jpg
    Workshop Pics 005.jpg

  12. #26
    Member Array thephanatik's Avatar
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    I'm finishing up building a shed right now. We went almost as big as we could go for our city. We are limited to 200 Sq feet, and we went 19'x9', right around 170sq feet. If we went bigger, we would have to cut down a tree or it would be too close to the house to get a trailer in our back yard.

    We used T1-11 siding on 16" OC 2x4 studs and 16" OC 2x6 roof. I highly recommend you put in a skylight. We bought one from one of those stores that sells donated used and new building supplies, we paid like $60 for it. It lights up the shed enough that we don't need a light on at all to work comfortably out there. In the pictures I've attached, I closed the door when I was inside to show how much natural light there still is.

    In supplies, I think we spent around $2,000. I can't tell you how much the concrete costs, because we doubled the width of our driveway, brought it all the way up beside the garage, added a 30ftx11ft patio, and the shed slab was all done at the same time. All of that concrete cost us $5,200 though.

    Make sure you know the codes you need to follow. My step-dad is stubborn and basically ignored a few of them. Building inspector came by, told him he can't bury junction boxes, we need a switch that shuts all the power off inside the shed, and it needs to be wired up to a GFCI. I told him all this, and he knew the codes, but he wanted to do it wrong and I got to redo it when it failed inspection. The metal plate in the picture is temporary until we pick up a new white one.

    If you haven't seen the new bubble covers, I snapped two pictures of ours.

    http://img560.imageshack.us/img560/7295/dsc07884e.jpg
    http://img545.imageshack.us/img545/5254/dsc07885k.jpg

    Something that changed a few years ago, outdoor receptacles need to have bubble covers, they are covers that cover the wires even when the outlet is in use. I think its a good idea, my step-dad thinks its just some stupid code to waste peoples money . I got to replace the older-style outlet covers for those too.

    We also did a roll-up door, it was super easy to install, and saved us the space from having a normal garage door track.

    If you look at the roof, the rafters do go the wrong way, my step-dad wanted to do that so we had more space. Not the way I would have done it, but he's paying for the shed and its going to be holding mostly his stuff, so I don't care that much.

    The door is offset because we decided to go 4' wider and the electrical would have ended up right in the middle of the door.

    The single 200 watt CFL we put in uses 65 watts, but lights up the entire shed a ton at night.

    DSC07877.jpgDSC07878.JPGDSC07879.JPGDSC07880.jpgDSC07881.jpgDSC07883.JPG
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  13. #27
    Distinguished Member Array DefConGun's Avatar
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    Very nice! Thanks for the pics guys. ;-)

  14. #28
    Distinguished Member Array DefConGun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHEC724 View Post
    Dang HOA... I swear that the fancier the neighborhood that you live in, the lower the quality of life.

    I was at my best with a little house in the woods and a shed out back. I'll get back to that someday...
    +111 I have a friend that has just bought house with HOA and she's not allowed to have a shed. She was talking to me the other day about wanting to plant a specific type of tree in her back yard. I warned her about HOA and advised her to check to see if she's allowed, etc. She insisted that she had a right to plant what ever she wanted but I reminded her that she gave up certain rights when she agreed to move into the HOA neighborhood.

    I'll have to check with code to see what my specific restrictions are but I would just about bet you a dime to a dollar that they won't be nearly as stringent as HOA requirements. I understand the idea behind HOA and realize that no one wants to spend a significant amount of money for a nice house in a nice neighborhood and have someone else come in and alter the neighborhood's presentation with structures that might be considered as being less desirable by some, etc. At the same time, however, if I want to place a small shed/workshop in my backyard then I believe I should be able to IMO. There's trade offs in all of it, you just have to decide what you're willing to accept.

  15. #29
    VIP Member Array zacii's Avatar
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    I live in the boonies, so when I needed a shed I bought an ocean cargo container

    It's not pretty, but it was fast and easy. Oh, and it's completely rain-tight
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  16. #30
    Distinguished Member Array DefConGun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zacii View Post
    I live in the boonies, so when I needed a shed I bought an ocean cargo container

    It's not pretty, but it was fast and easy. Oh, and it's completely rain-tight
    All I can say to that is; sweet! ;-)

    I tell ya, there are definite advantages for living in the boonies. I like the advantages of living in town but I have found that whenever I'm staying in town for an extended amount of time, I always find myself missing the country. Other than the times when I'm wanting to get out to do things in town, I don't find myself missing the times I lived in town - when I'm living in the country. That sounds grammatically awkward but I'm going to be lazy and leave it as is and hope you know what I mean.

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