I fired my doctor today - Page 3

I fired my doctor today

This is a discussion on I fired my doctor today within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Originally Posted by INccwchris I fired my doctor because they decided to post a no firearms sign when mine was found during an exam. Went ...

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  1. #31
    VIP Member Array mlr1m's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by INccwchris View Post
    I fired my doctor because they decided to post a no firearms sign when mine was found during an exam. Went to wishard and have never looked back. its posted but my doc said ignore the sign. We went shooting three months ago and have been cool ever since. The doctor I fired put me on the trespass list and when I went to get my chart the staff called IMPD and had me escorted out. What a class act huh?
    If you told your old doctor why you left him I doubt class had anything to do with why he the police on you. More likely he considered you dangerous. He probably considers anyone with such strong beliefs about weapons to be mentally unstable.
    Just a guess on my part.

    Michael


  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by shockwave View Post
    I had a very poor endocrinologist - dude was really gung-ho on cutting out my thyroid (hyperthyroidism via Graves Disease). He wanted that gland gone. Put me on Synthroid the rest of my life, but close out my file, ("case solved"). I refused and advocated for myself very forcefully. So we did the Tapazole regimen for a year.

    Oh, my brothers, you have no idea the torments I suffered, but at the end my thyroid resumed normal function and I'm remitted. Luckily, I wound up being one of the fortunate 20 percent that survive this treatment and beat the damn thing.

    But what I can't forget is that my endocrinologist was not my friend in this fight. Dude was distant, and all he seemed to want to do was yank that thyroid out of my body. He wasn't concerned with my best outcome, he wanted a quick and easy closure to this patient's problem.

    He was championing his workload, not my health.

    Well, this applies to all of you out there reading this. The same thing applies to you, whatever your health concern is. You must be your own best health advocate. If some issue arises that you need to deal with, then you'd better hit Google hard, hit webmd, adam, every site you can find dealing with your condition.

    Take some time and become a total freaking g-damn expert on your health concern. Learn the language, the treatments, and the percentage outcomes of the various procedures - just like you do before you take your car into a mechanic. You don't want to be flim-flammed.

    When you have that interview-consult with your doc, you want to be so knowledgeable as to make his or her jaw drop. You want to be throwing out the lingo, referencing the studies, making it crystal clear that you are fully up to speed and there will be no scenario where you're being treated like some idiot customer: "We can fix your car, but we have to replace the whatsi-doodle thinga-ma-jig."

    No, never let them do that. The Internet provides you with the tools to understand medical science at a high level and most of the information can be accessed at a layman's perspective. Full disclosure: The best possible result for you might be extremely tough and painful, but you can win that fight. Your doctor will usually lean toward the easy, sure fix that isn't hard, but also isn't the best result from a long-term quality of life perspective for you.
    While I agree with you about 98% of the way, I want to offer some caution on the remaining 2%.

    We lay people can study up all we want, but we are doing it in an isolated way. We can not easily tell the parts of what we read which are true, the parts which are bull, or the parts which are misleading because we have only our own single example for experience. Moreover, we lack the broad additional education needed to fully comprehend what we are reading. We have no broad clinical experience with lots of different people who present with the same problem in all its various manifestations.

    I can tell you that I have professional level knowledge and training that far exceeds what the ordinary guy with a HS biology education and a year of biology in college has. I have done extensive surgeries of many different types on dogs and on sheep for research purposes. I have had full responsibility for managing their care; for administering preoperative medicines and post operative care. I've done kidney transplants and open heart surgery, albeit on dogs or sheep. I've studied toxicology and pharmacology in a professional way, and had many related advanced classes---actually, I've had a rather unusual and weird set of education, training, and work experience, which may be unique.

    For all of that, there is plenty about human clinical medicine which I simply do not know. Although I can read about it, and maybe even understand the biochemistry and cell biology and the physiology and sometimes the pharmacology better than my doc, I totally lack the clinical skills needed to put myself entirely in the driver's seat.

    Even at work, where I was paired and partnered with a veterinary pathologist, I often found that my understanding of something we were working on or discussing, and his understanding, were entirely different. We could read the same manuscripts but he had a different way of looking at what was written. That is because he had the experience of practicing clinical veterinary medicine and the experience of actually having seen what a particular disease does to the organs from doing all the postmortem exams; both gross and of microscopic tissue.

    You (most of us, myself included) can be educated consumers, but we are treading on really thin ice when we try to play clinician and substitute our unlearned judgment for years of clinical training. And this is true as well for many PAs, nurses, EMTs, nurse practitioners. It ain't the same level of education and training the real doc has.

    The old saying trust but verify applies to medical care. If something isn't right get another opinion. Make sure it is independent. Possibly find your way to a major medical teaching center.

    But, never think you know more than the doc in some broad way. You don't. You might be dealing with a dud, with someone who shouldn't be practicing, or with someone who has had a bad day or is off their game, but just because you read something doesn't mean you now know more than that doc. It is equally possible that you just read misinformation without knowing it; or that there are other angles and issues you are unaware of. Even if s/he is wrong on one particular, overall, all of that clinical training and experience, those years in a residency program, mean something.

    It is fashionable to bash docs, and I do my part of that game, and yes there are times to fire a doc. However, oftentimes our dissatisfaction (when it isn't about mannerisms or personality) is due to our ignorance. We'll listen to what the sales guy at the health food store tells us but disbelieve our doc. We'll believe that kid with a degree in gym over the doc. We might listen to something a nurse has to say and somehow accept that as more valid than what the doc says. We need to keep it in perspective. There is a reason they went to school till they were 30 and passed a bunch of examinations and have the words "Board Certified" hanging on a certificate in their office.
    shockwave and Rock and Glock like this.
    If the Union is once severed, the line of separation will grow wider and wider, and the controversies which are now debated and settled in the halls of legislation will then be tried in fields of battle and determined by the sword.
    Andrew Jackson

  3. #33
    Ex Member Array dcselby1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TN_Mike View Post
    I fired my doctor today
    .
    I know what you mean. I fired my cardiologist this week. I've been going to this guy for several years and spent THOUSANDS of dollars there. I asked him to fill out ONE Veterans Affairs form for my claim documenting my treatment for heart disease as a result of exposure to Agent Orange in Vietnam. (The ONLY form I've asked him to do for me). He does NOT have a huge practice and, I'm sure a nurse would have completed the form for his signature, but he refused. Whatever happened to complete patient care?

  4. #34
    VIP Member Array Eagleks's Avatar
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    Good Job. I had one who did his 2 minute visit and would write a prescription and run away. I had "questions" .... and at a visit he was anxious to split out the door.... $85 for 2 min is quite a scam.... and I told him that he could have a chair , as I had some questions and I wasn't leaving until I had a few answers. He was not happy..... and I told him too.... hey, you dont' give a dang about your patients and you used to be a good doctor, but since you've been at this clinic.... you've become the Mgr of a fast food restaurant.

    I went to a different Dr. Then he told me that he wanted me have X test. I asked why, and he said " because I said so" .... and then I explained in no certain terms.... he was my advisor, not my mother, and I was the only one who would decide what was or wasn't going to be done to me, and he could be right, but I don't do anything without knowning why. So, if he wanted to be my Dr.... that was just something he would have to put up with. He laughed, didn't have any issues with that, and said NO PROBLEM. We've done fine with each other since then.
    I don't make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts. --- Will Rogers ---
    Chief Justice John Roberts : "I don't see how you can read Heller and not take away from it the notion that the Second Amendment...was extremely important to the framers in their view of what liberty meant."

  5. #35
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    What ever happened to the Dr.'s hipocratic oath? Healthcare has become a race for profit. Most Dr.'s will not refer you to specialists because the insurance companys don't want them to. Dr.'s get bonuses for the patients that they keep from going to emergency rooms and specialists. I had a family practice Dr. which I was seeing and wanted a referal to see an endocrinalogist for my type 1 diabetes. I had great insurance and wanted to be put on the insulin pump, he said "you don't need that, I can treat you here and keep you on daily insulin injections". I wasn't aware that my insurance company didn't require referals. Long story short, I started seeing an Endo, got my pump, I'm doing great with my treatment and I've only seen the Dr. when I pick my wife up from work (she works for him).Tsk tsk.
    Why?? Because at the last second, the Police are minutes away.

  6. #36
    VIP Member Array paramedic70002's Avatar
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    Ah Doctors...

    I've observed Doctors, nurses, etc. at work for about a quarter century. I'm not a Doctor, and I don't know all the nuances of practicing medicine, but I know when I see someone royally screw up, and I have seen that many times.

    The biggest problem any Doctor has is his staff, whether he knows it or not. My wife has been around and around with the crappy staffs of many good Doctors. Doctors are not business people, so they hire an Office Manager and an RN to field calls. The OM aka 'business expert' becomes a petty tyrant and the RN becomes a deflector. Both actively, if subconsciously, work to piss off the Doctor's patients.

    The thing about firing your Doctor, in some places and specialties, you have little option because either he is the only guy that handles that specialty, or he is in the only group that handles that specialty (you're marked), or your insurance company won't pay for you to go out of network.
    "Each worker carried his sword strapped to his side." Nehemiah 4:18

    Guns Save Lives. Paramedics Save Lives. But...
    Paramedics With Guns Scare People!

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by dcselby1 View Post
    I know what you mean. I fired my cardiologist this week. I've been going to this guy for several years and spent THOUSANDS of dollars there. I asked him to fill out ONE Veterans Affairs form for my claim documenting my treatment for heart disease as a result of exposure to Agent Orange in Vietnam. (The ONLY form I've asked him to do for me). He does NOT have a huge practice and, I'm sure a nurse would have completed the form for his signature, but he refused. Whatever happened to complete patient care?
    Have you considered that he might not know anything at all about the alleged health effects of Agent Orange? Perhaps you asked him to document something that is out of his ability to document. Or perhaps you believe that your condition is related to exposure to Agent Orange, but serious science doesn't substantiate that claim.

    The health effects of Agent Orange always have been highly controversial and the legal disputes legend.
    Your doc might be too young to know about most of this, and not want to be involved either.

    It does seem unlikely that heart disease is a proven result. "The National Toxicology Program has classified TCDD as "known to be a human carcinogen", frequently associated with soft-tissue sarcoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).[19][20]" (From Wiki) and "

    "Studies of veterans who served in the South during the war have increased rates of cancer, nerve, digestive, skin and respiratory disorders. Veterans from the south had higher rates of throat cancer, acute/chronic leukemia, Hodgkin's lymphoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, prostate cancer, lung cancer, soft tissue sarcoma and liver cancer. Other than liver cancer, these are the same conditions the US Veteran's Administration has found to be associated with exposure to Agent Orange/dioxin, and are on the list of conditions eligible for compensation and treatment.[35]" (Wiki)

    VA has a list of conditions associated with exposure to Agent Orange. I don't know how they process such claims but I think it is their job to determine if your condition is one which is on the list. Your doc's assertion that you suffer from heart disease because of prior exposure is likely not going to do you much good. VA can get your medical records and make their own determination.
    If the Union is once severed, the line of separation will grow wider and wider, and the controversies which are now debated and settled in the halls of legislation will then be tried in fields of battle and determined by the sword.
    Andrew Jackson

  8. #38
    Senior Member Array tclance's Avatar
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    Personally, most doctors are all the same. You make an appointment for 11am show up 10-15 minits earley only to find 6-10 people sitting there waiting. When you sign in you look at the time the other patients have sighned in and most of them have been waiting for quite a while. What is the point of making an appointment if the dr cant keep up with his schedual?
    I really beleive that its all about the money. What kind of care do you think you are going to receive if the Dr is running patients through his office and constantly playing catch up with all the patients that were overbooked? Do we really think they have our best interests in heart or just a paycheck? Makes you wonder sometimes. I still remember when I was a kid when the Dr made housecalls! Now that was customer service. Nowadays, most of them wont even see you if you dont have insurance. Unfourtunitly you dont have much of a choice. And god forbid you have to see a specialist. You need a referal for that and then have to wait 2-3 weeks for an appointment, then the whole cycle is repeated again.
    TC

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