One of your hobbies is Martial Arts

One of your hobbies is Martial Arts

This is a discussion on One of your hobbies is Martial Arts within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; I've noticed that some of you are involved or active in some form of martial arts, eg. Jeet Kune do, Krav Maga, aikido, etc. For ...

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    Senior Member Array MotorCityGun's Avatar
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    One of your hobbies is Martial Arts

    I've noticed that some of you are involved or active in some form of martial arts, eg. Jeet Kune do, Krav Maga, aikido, etc. For clarity, I'm not talking about "self defense" courses, although, that might a good topic for a future post.

    Could you please provide a brief (as possible) description of what you're involved in. To keep things brief and consistent, try and follow this format, but feel free to add anything else you deem to be informative:

    Brief History of your "style":

    Your number of year(s) training and level of proficiency:

    Training regiment:

    What occurs in a typical class:

    Emphasis, if any, on certain skills, techniques or "approach":

    Benefit(s) derived from training:
    “They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.” - Ben Franklin

    NRA Life


  2. #2
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    All my HTH was courtesy of the USMC&at the time DEVGRU,it covers a lot of disciplines and some things from experience.

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    Distinguished Member Array Lotus222's Avatar
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    I trained in Taekwondo for 9 years through my teens. I was qualified and was invited to the national championships in Vegas and Sacremento on 4 occasions, though I never did go compete. I tested to a second degree black belt, although, I could have tested and become a 3rd degree in my last year of training. I'll try to break it down on a simple level, through my experiences.

    Taekwondo has a very strict order of operations. Bow to flags before entering the "floor" (workout area). There are scripted dialogs which are different by schools that are recited before class (similar to the Pledge of Aliegence). It teaches discipline, self control, individuality, and a number of mental and physical training exercises. It can be great for kids - especially with a good instructor. It can be intense for adults in an advanced class (in a good way).

    Physically, it focuses on striking. Key points are stances, technique, and combat. As you progress (IE through belt colors), you will learn more advanced techniques, and more ways to implement and refine your core techniques. testing up to new belts is a formal affair that you can usually only do ever few months. Each belt has a "form" that is a choreographed instance of strikes, blocks, stances, and other techniques that can be judged in both testing for new belts, and in tournaments. The difficulty of these forms directly correspond with the belt rankings.

    A typical class involves stretching and mentally preparing, physical training (strength and endurance), practicing form and technique; practicing striking on pads - usually with partners; and sparring (either freely or tournament style).
    Tournaments are based on a point system as follows:
    No hitting below the belt, and no hitting to the back.
    -Hand strike to the head or body is 1 point.
    -Foot strike to the body is 1 point.
    -Foot strike to the head is 2 points.
    3 to 5 points will win a match.

    As you advance, you will learn more practical techniques that involve real world situations. Learning how to avoid a threat is always first. Learning how to stop and incapacitate a threat through offensive or defensive means is taught. Grappling (like judo) may be taught. Weapons training/specializing courses and weapons defense courses may be taught.

    The benefits are ...well... there are a ton. You will learn a lot about yourself if you really put some effort into martial arts. Physically, you can learn to be a defensive weapon. Mentally, you will gain confidence, self respect, respect of others, and you may just be humbled by what you learn you and other people can be capable of.
    Last edited by Lotus222; October 12th, 2011 at 02:55 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MotorCityGun View Post
    I've noticed that some of you are involved or active in some form of martial arts, eg. Jeet Kune do, Krav Maga, aikido, etc. For clarity, I'm not talking about "self defense" courses, although, that might a good topic for a future post.

    Could you please provide a brief (as possible) description of what you're involved in. To keep things brief and consistent, try and follow this format, but feel free to add anything else you deem to be informative:

    Brief History of your "style":

    Your number of year(s) training and level of proficiency:

    Your number of year(s) training and level of proficiency:

    What occurs in a typical class:

    Emphasis, if any, on certain skills, techniques or "approach":

    Benefit(s) derived from training:
    1) Brief History of your "style": Don't know really and don't care. One is an indigenous art made modern and the other developed for modern military trainees.

    2)Your number of year(s) training and level of proficiency: On and off for 8 years. Modest level of proficiency, no black belt, that's for certain. I don't test; refuse to test. Don't care about stuff like that and I'm not in a traditional art. There are some things I know and do that are very advanced and lots of things I know or do which are hardly more than one or two levels up from beginner. Partly that is a function of the late age at which I began and some physical limitations on what I can do at my age.

    3) Your number of year(s) training and level of proficiency: For first two years or so I was training 3 1/2 hours a week. Last two years I tried to train 3 hours a week but it was usually more like 2.5

    4)What occurs in a typical class: Sometimes not much; but when I take private lessons as I have for the last 2 years it has been a mix of work strength, agility, balance, and flexibility; combatives adapted from traditional arts and from Krav, jujitsu like throws; weapons--sticks, knives, chairs, belt, whatever is handy, with emphasis on disarms; lots of emphasis on self defense. E.g., attacked while going to open your car.

    5)Emphasis, if any, on certain skills, techniques or "approach": various weapons, punches, kicks, throws, response to unexpected attack and multiple attackers.

    6) Benefit(s) derived from training: much improved agility and general physical well being. Some ability gained to not be a helpless victim or someone who must rely solely on lethal options.
    If the Union is once severed, the line of separation will grow wider and wider, and the controversies which are now debated and settled in the halls of legislation will then be tried in fields of battle and determined by the sword.
    Andrew Jackson

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    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    Traditional Chinese Kenpo

    Traditional Chinese kenpo is street fighting. Kenpo means Chaun Fa or, law of the fist. It is characterized by it's multiply strikes. It was put together in system form and broken down into 30 techniques per belt by the Tracy Brothers after a split with Ed Parker. It maintains the katas as being taught with techniques.
    The techniques are the strength behind the system, dealing with a systematic response to a given attack, and progresses into more detail and combination as the student moves up and matures.

    An example is to that to neutralize an attack, one must first understand what the attack is. For instance, if someone grabs you with both hands by the lapel or collar, that is not the attack, but a precurser to the attack. The attack will be a punch. So the emphasis is neutralizing the punch, and completely destroying the opponent by a combination of strikes aimed at to create uncommon pain in places quicker than the opponent can adjust.
    This would be accomplished in this particular technique by immediatly trapping the opponents hand, driving a Speer hand to the throat, while at the same time raising your foot and raking down on the shin bone and stomping on the small bones of the opponets foot. This is immediately followed with placing your left hand on the left side of the opponents face to stabilize it while you smash your right elbow to the right side jaw.
    At this point the finish would be a pivoting rear back thrust to the groin, to create distance and prepare for any follow up.
    Kenpo is all about kicks, but uses them in techniques.

    Kenpo is not for competition, it is a war art. It is not pretty to watch. It is about explosive power and speed, with a goal of serious injury. Eye strikes, groin strikes, and breaking bones is the goal.

    I practiced for 21 years, but no longer do.

    The work outs are oriented for fighting stamina. Very cardio, with emphasis on high reps of punching combinations and kicks to the air to build memory, speed and balance, divided with additional time on the heavy bag to develop power.

    Consists of one on one time with instructor for 30 minutes a week, where you are taught 3 techniques at a time, and then at least 4-6 hours a week of workout where techniques are reenforced.

    A kenpo practioneer is just as home fighting someone in as close proximity as in a phone booth as in the open with distance.
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    Senior Member Array adric22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MotorCityGun View Post
    Brief History of your "style":
    Aikido is a self-defense art. It does not include any attacks such as punching or kicking. It is based on joint locking techniques. For example, if somebody tries to punch you or grab you, there are various methods to turn those attacks to your favor in order to gain control of your attacker.
    Your number of year(s) training and level of proficiency:
    I practiced for 2 years. I gained an orange belt. However, my instructor didn't give out belts very often. Our class was free provided by the company I worked for and our instructor said belts must be earned and most of your for-profit trainers like to promote people very quickly in order to keep them interested and keep them coming back for more money.
    Training regiment:
    What occurs in a typical class:
    Warm up stretches, followed by short instruction of the new technique to be learned. The class lines up and each one will attack the instructor one at a time and the instructor will demonstrate the technique. Once learned, we practice on each other. Towards the end of the class each person will spend a few minutes being attacked by the rest of the class at random in order to practice previously learned skills.
    Emphasis, if any, on certain skills, techniques or "approach":
    Benefit(s) derived from training:[/B]
    I gained several things from the class.
    • Exposure to pain - Yes the classes are painful. But when enduring pain regularly, we become accustomed to it and no longer fear the pain. That is essential when in a fight. Most people are so afraid of a little pain that it impairs their judgement of the bigger picture.
    • Self Confidence - I know I stand a lot better chance than the average person in a fight.
    • Preparedness (muscle memory) - If somebody were to jump me unexpectedly, no matter how they grabbed ahold of me, I would have an immediate response based on what I have practiced in class 100's of times. I would not need to try to "think about it" while my attacker is trying to kill me.
    "Good people do not need laws to tell them to act responsibly, while bad people will find a way around the laws." -Plato

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    Brief History of your "style": Shorin Ryu (Okinawan Karate), Shotokan (Japanese Karate), Taekwondo (Korean).

    Your number of year(s) training and level of proficiency: 24 years -- 3rd degree black belt in all 3 styles.

    Training regiment: I don't train anymore. Age and arthritis have taken their toll. At one time I studied/trained/taught 4-5 days a week.

    What occurs in a typical class:

    Emphasis, if any, on certain skills, techniques or "approach": My interest was always in practical self-defense. Not all styles teach usable techniques but instead focus on a particular technique used for a particular attack. By the time you remember the technique you're supposed to use you've been hit.

    Benefit(s) derived from training: Self-confidence, physical fitness, and the ability to inflict more pain than most dumbasses know they are capable of experiencing.


    Glockman, you said,
    Kenpo is not for competition, it is a war art. It is not pretty to watch. It is about explosive power and speed, with a goal of serious injury. Eye strikes, groin strikes, and breaking bones is the goal.
    I will agree that is the goal, but disagree with the competition statement. I saw lots of Chinese Kenpo students over the years do very well at tournaments, not only in fighting but in forms competition too. A lot will depend on the instructor and even more on the student but I hate to see you sell your art short on any front. It's an extremely effective style both in competition and on the street.

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    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    Yes, it can be used in competition, but if you are training strictly for SD, you will find yourself thrown out of matches from disqualification. We wore cups when sparring, as even did the woman to protect those extremely sensitive areas.
    But, they were considered fair game in sparring practice.

    I went to one competition, and was thrown out for striking my competitor in the groin as soon as he telegraphed a kick. It was most embarrassing. I was booed by those in attendance and banned for the year. That was in my first year. I never attempted competition again.
    You will fight just like you train.
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    Senior Member Array adric22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glockman10mm View Post
    Kenpo is not for competition, it is a war art. It is not pretty to watch. It is about explosive power and speed, with a goal of serious injury. Eye strikes, groin strikes, and breaking bones is the goal.
    In my opinion this type of martial art is difficult to learn. The problem is that you can't actually practice breaking bones and striking eyes, throats, etc. That is another reason I think Aikido makes for a better self defense art. People can train in class the exact techniques they will use on an attacker without risk of damaging their classmate's body. Inflect some pain, yes, but not damage. My teacher also taught us some Aiki-Jitsu techniques that are very brutal, however, I could never use them in a real life situation because we could never actually practice them for real. In order for the techniques to be of any use they need to be practiced so many times that they become muscle-memory. That way when the real attack comes, you don't have to think, you just do.
    "Good people do not need laws to tell them to act responsibly, while bad people will find a way around the laws." -Plato

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    Member Array tenorwizard's Avatar
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    Ive practiced judo for 2 years and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu for 6. Classes for both were rather silimar considering they are similar arts. It's divided into 3 sections, first being stretching and warm up, the second being learning/applying techniques through drills and then the third is randori/rolling. (free sparring)

    The main emphasis for judo is throws/grappling and BJJ is grappling/submissions. Technique is the heart and soul of these martial arts. If you don't have any, you're not beating anyone.

    The benefits are huge! First, You are gaining proficiency in martial arts and are no nonsense, strictly effective and efficient, proven to be effective in self defense. Second, since training and sparring can be done at full speed, you will always fight or use your skills at 100%. No worrying about will I pull my strikes, etc. (fight how you train) Third, there isn't any conditioning like grappling, ask any wrestler. It will get you in shape.

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    Member Array tenorwizard's Avatar
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    I can definitely agree with your statement about eye gouges and groin strikes, and I truly think aikido would be better if they had effective forms of free sparring, not compliant partner drills.

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    PB2
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    Quote Originally Posted by glockman10mm View Post
    Yes, it can be used in competition, but if you are training strictly for SD, you will find yourself thrown out of matches from disqualification. We wore cups when sparring, as even did the woman to protect those extremely sensitive areas.
    But, they were considered fair game in sparring practice.

    I went to one competition, and was thrown out for striking my competitor in the groin as soon as he telegraphed a kick. It was most embarrassing. I was booed by those in attendance and banned for the year. That was in my first year. I never attempted competition again.
    You will fight just like you train.
    Sorry to hear about your experience. Sounds like the people running your local tournaments didn't have a very realistic view of fighting. My belief is that there is a lot of real life training to be gained from controlled techniques in either sparring or competition. I will admit that I did see a large amount of "playing the game". To me that means the use of techniques which would score a point, but in a real situation would not be effective at all. Like anything else, you get out of it what you put into it and a good attitude about what is being learned and how it can be applied will go a long way. It sounds like you got what you wanted from your training and didn't need them or their "playing the game" tournaments anyway.

    A somewhat related story.....We had a woman move here from another state who had been involved in a school for the past 2 years and was a black belt. The first time we started padding up for sparring practice she was confused and had no idea what we were doing. When we explained she was mortified. She had never fought, sparred, or hit another human being. How in the heck does someone get to be a black belt in a martial art of any kind without ever having to fight? Evidently at the school she went to that's how it was.

    Ever notice how when someone says "XYZ style is the best" what they are really saying is "I study XYZ style"?

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    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    I don't have an opinion as to which is better. To say this one or that one is complete lack of knowledge. If one wants to learn beautiful high kicks, TKD is the way to go. You want flowing movements, go Akido, you want to learn throws and joint locks then go Judo or Jui Jitsu.

    Years ago when I learned Kenpo, I figured a stand up art was better against multiple opponents. It is a battlefield art. You do not have the luxury of rolling around with someone, and I never wanted to be on the hot asphalt of a parking lot trying to gain a submission or joint lock on someone while their friend hit me with a bottle.

    I have also Taken Akido, but it is not for me. It does have Ateme ( strikes) but that is not in it's purest form.

    The trick to martial arts is realize they all achieve the same goal in different ways. Just like a circle. However, a circle can be stopped with a straight line. Now, this is a mystery to all but those skilled in both Chinese and Japanese art forms.

    So choosing a style that fits your particular needs is important, but choosing one that compliments your natural abilities and body type are even more so.
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    Quote Originally Posted by glockman10mm View Post
    I don't have an opinion as to which is better. To say this one or that one is complete lack of knowledge. If one wants to learn beautiful high kicks, TKD is the way to go. You want flowing movements, go Akido, you want to learn throws and joint locks then go Judo or Jui Jitsu.

    Years ago when I learned Kenpo, I figured a stand up art was better against multiple opponents. It is a battlefield art. You do not have the luxury of rolling around with someone, and I never wanted to be on the hot asphalt of a parking lot trying to gain a submission or joint lock on someone while their friend hit me with a bottle.

    I have also Taken Akido, but it is not for me. It does have Ateme ( strikes) but that is not in it's purest form.

    The trick to martial arts is realize they all achieve the same goal in different ways. Just like a circle. However, a circle can be stopped with a straight line. Now, this is a mystery to all but those skilled in both Chinese and Japanese art forms.

    So choosing a style that fits your particular needs is important, but choosing one that compliments your natural abilities and body type are even more so.
    It was not my intention to imply that you were saying your style was better. That is just a semi-humorous saying I used to use a lot. The same thing can be said about gun people or many other things.

    Sounds like we are on the same page in a basic philosophy.

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    Never had any form of training. Was always interested but they don't teach anything like that around here. 15 years of wrestling, 3 boxing, lots of back road and rodeo fights, some bar fights back in the day.

    Kind of a learn as you go figure out what works and what didn't. I don't claim to be a fighter by any means and try to avoid them if possible. Taking someone down pinning their arms with your knees with a little ground and pound takes the wind out of most guys sails.

    The School of Hard Knocks and Country Life (would of much rather had some sort of formal training though)

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