Upland Bird Dog - Page 2

Upland Bird Dog

This is a discussion on Upland Bird Dog within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Originally Posted by SIXTO I know this guy's location is impractical for you, but he has some nice looking dogs; Home Those are some very ...

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  1. #16
    Member Array gixxerboy1k's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIXTO View Post
    I know this guy's location is impractical for you, but he has some nice looking dogs;
    Home
    Those are some very nice looking dogs but i am sure they are way out of my price range even if they are closer i am in no hurry to get will just keep watching the classifieds and some local websites, around here word of mouth is the best way to buy anything usually leads to the best deals.

    And i also do want to have a pup outside all winter would rather have them a little older to be outside for thier first winter if i cant get them talked into letting me have it in the house


  2. #17
    Member Array gixxerboy1k's Avatar
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    I have been thinking about this the only thing that concerns me with getting a older dog is trying to break them out of bad habits that are already formed.

    But i also think that depends on the dog and the breed my GSP was very smart and if she did something that you didnt like you could break her of that, like she never stayed in the house until she was 5 months when my daughter was born and she stayed in the house at my parents house for a week and didnt go in the house once, which i have had many labs that took forever to house break and seemed like you are constantly watching them and cleaning up after them.

    my question for you gunny bunny how well do dogs that come from a bad situation handle training and things like that, i defiantly think that adoption is going to be a option for me

    Thanks

  3. #18
    VIP Member Array Doghandler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gixxerboy1k View Post
    ...i defiantly think that adoption is going to be a option for me

    Thanks
    Well, adoption is a good way to get a family pet but I would advise against this for a hunter or for any working dog of any sort for that matter. A friend of mine adopted a Brittany that will not hunt. She just remains at heal while out in the field and shows no interest whatsoever in hunting.

    My recommendation is to not cut corners on a hunting dog. I paid $650 for my Springer from Royal Legacy and have zero regrets. She has kind of a hard mouth but that's my fault for allowing it. On the other hand she will not take crap from any rooster that still has some fight left in him.
    Last edited by Doghandler; November 3rd, 2011 at 05:51 PM. Reason: spelling
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  4. #19
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    You really do have to be carefull with a rescued dog. There is a reason they needed rescued; valuable hunting dogs just don't get abandoned like some Heinz 57 mutt. But if you have the patience and skill, go for it. My setter was nothing but a hot mess when he came from a bird dog rescue a few years ago. He was so messed up, I could not get within 10 feet of him. Everyone of my hunting buddies thought I was crazy and should have him put down. But, I knew enough to be able to spot quality linage, and was confident enough in my ability to build his confidence and break a gun shy dog. It took a few years, but he hunts now, isn't a bit shy and is birdy as can be. I get compliments everytime I go to the field with him, even offers to buy.
    My point is not to brag on my dog, but to point out that a rescue dog is a gamble. Be sure you know what your getting into. The dog might be a diamond in the rough or a pure nightmare.
    Last edited by SIXTO; November 6th, 2011 at 10:53 AM. Reason: fixed some typos
    "Just blame Sixto"

  5. #20
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    SIXTO what are Weimaraners bred to hunt?
    I havenít heard any of the journalists who volunteered to be waterboarded asking to have their fingernails wrenched out with pliers, or electrodes attached to their genitals.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by gixxerboy1k View Post
    I Have an old wood dog house that has a electric heater in it that i made for my last dog and she never slept in it she always slept in the shed in some old hay, i am also outside 2-3 nights a week during the week working in the garage or shooting or just doing something i dont like being cooped up in the house and have a part time business working on at atvs and motorcycles so it would get quite a bit of attention and care. then i am out mostly every day on the weekend in the winter it will be hunting and the summer fishing and just being outside and i would take the pup with me everywhere i go on the weekends as long as she was well behaved, and i am working on getting them talked into having a pup in the house. i grew up with atleast three in the house most of my life at my parents and my wife's family never had them in the house. so they think that they just destroy things and make the house worth way less which i know isnt true as long as you have a well behaved pup, i know between the pup and my daughter i will be spending alot of time fixing things that they ruin or break or make a spot on the floor but the enjoyment they bring into the house is worth way more then a few messes to me
    Even a well behaved dog will occassionally destroy something in the house. I'm sitting here by the stove, watching my 12 year old girl sleeping on her dog bed. She is snoring and life is wonderful. I would not trade this evening with her for any material thing she has torn up in her lifetime. The love, loyalty, and companionship are priceless.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by atctimmy View Post
    SIXTO what are Weimaraners bred to hunt?
    Yes, but much like labs and goldens, the hunting linage has been bred out of most lines. There are a lot of good hunting lines left though, you just have to look.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by atctimmy View Post
    SIXTO what are Weimaraners bred to hunt?
    Oh my soul...

    Weimaraners were bred as the hunting dogs of German nobility (Weimar Republic, hence the name) and were not available to "commoners" until well into the 20th century. However, now that the "patent" has expired for numerous dog generations, the hunting attributes are diluted. You have to do your research to find good lines that have retained the hunting instincts. Likewise the Viszlas.

    Re-examining your question: birds, badgers, bunnies.
    Smitty
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  9. #24
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    Whoops, I misread that too. Primarly rabbits and birds; upland game.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  10. #25
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    This issue about hunting lineage is most important. I wouldn't have the slightest idea how to teach a dog to hunt. Get a hunter, teach it some manners (this is a lifetime project ) and you're good to go.

    Let's look at Springers, for example. The AKC only recognizes one breed of Springer but this dog has actually been breed in two separate lines for many years, the field line and the bench or show line. They are very different dogs.

  11. #26
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    I too am sorry for your loss. Dogs are such wonderful companions, it's so hard when you lose one.

    I agree that adoption is the best way to go and that there are many hunting dogs that are trainable that get dumped at shelters, usually thru no fault of their own. Many people get a dog b/c they think it's cute and have no idea that they will need to train it, walk it, etc. I've been a volunteer with a rescue called Dogwood Sporting Dog Rescue who rescues various hunting breeds from hi-kill shelters in Idaho and Utah mostly, even though we live in BC. While true that many of the dogs are dumped at the shelter b/c they failed hunter training, there are others that are still wonderful hunting dogs. I hope you would consider adopting a rescue dog as they are so wonderful and deserve a second chance.
    Now, my only "issue" with your home is that you plan to keep the dog outside 99% of the time, and in a cold winter place like N Dakota, this really worries me. Dogs need to be inside in cold places like that. Especially dogs who don't have huge thick fur like Huskies, Samoyed's, etc.
    Please consider having your dog inside the house as it is way too cold to keep a dog outside. Also, dogs like to be around people and don't want to be "banished" to the outside.

  12. #27
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    I would recommend the English Springer Spaniel. Had one years ago, and have never had as good a dog again. They are a little quick when young, but settle down with a little training and age. Damn, I still miss her..............
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  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by vietnamvet66 View Post
    I would recommend the English Springer Spaniel. Had one years ago, and have never had as good a dog again. They are a little quick when young, but settle down with a little training and age. Damn, I still miss her..............
    They're still making English Springers ya know.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  14. #29
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    Sorry, also. It's going to be hard to find one thats not energetic..thats what makes them hunters, after all. If they're not running everything, might as well get a cat.
    Light travels faster than sound...thats why some people appear bright before they speak

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by boatail View Post
    Sorry, also. It's going to be hard to find one thats not energetic..thats what makes them hunters, after all. If they're not running everything, might as well get a cat.
    Cat? What is this thing you speak of?

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