Bringing civilation to the rural areas - Page 3

Bringing civilation to the rural areas

This is a discussion on Bringing civilation to the rural areas within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; +1 msgt/ret. Move to the country and then they want streetlights everywhere!!...

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Thread: Bringing civilation to the rural areas

  1. #31
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    +1 msgt/ret. Move to the country and then they want streetlights everywhere!!


  2. #32
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    Small town America, and its values are dying. Very sad and unfortunate.

  3. #33
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    Yeah. City folk can be a real peculiar breed .

    Two instances that stick out in my mind are these.

    In St Clair Co. Mi, (by me), some ding dong moves out to the country, dirt road and whatnot, and then starts complaining to the township that her elderly neighbor lady needed to start mowing her field full of noxious weeds{10 or 15 acres) because it was causing her allergies to run out of control.

    AND this one is a real beaut;

    Same deal, people buy a piece of land, build a house, south of Lansing 20-30 miles, then all of a sudden begin complaining about the pig farm 4 parcels away........DUMB BELLS!!!!!!!!!!!
    If you want to make God laugh, tell him your plans.

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  4. #34
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    And the good news is this... believe it or not... people are moving out of the country/small town... and into metropolis... I'm all for it... let 'em go...
    Rats!
    It could be worse!
    I suppose

  5. #35
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    There's still plenty out there somewhere, you just have to look for it and adjust accordingly. Maybe fewer jobs that might pay less, but hey, money's not all it's cracked up to be.

    My wife has a bumper sticker "Like the Snow and Cold, Keeps out the Riff-Raff"

    I just tell folks we like our Philharmonic and Opera Company just fine the way they are, and maybe they ought to slide on up the road to Hartsel because they have Kabuki Theater too. That is a reason to open carry too - scares off some of the anti-gun riff-raff and a bunch of the liberals and progressives.

    The only downside is no grocery store for 1/2 hour, restaurants are an hour plus...........you can tell I'm from Kansas because I measure distances with the amount of time required to get somewhere.

    BTW - This thread title has it backwards - should be removing civilization from the rural areas.

  6. #36
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    BTW - This thread title has it backwards - should be removing civilization from the rural areas.
    More true than we really want to believe. Depends on your definition of "civilization" though. I could never understand the reasoning why a small group moves into an area and all of a sudden they don't like it and want to change it to the horrid place they left behind. I would almost believe that those people were sent in some outlandish Recon Mission to scope out the place, complain about it and then get others of their kind to move in and help "correct" the situation.

    I wonder what would happen if some of us moved into "their" environment and wanted to change it to something it has never been?

    I think we'd be in for a real fight.
    "A Smith & Wesson always beats 4 aces!"

    The Man Prayer. "Im a man, I can change, if I have to.....I guess!" ~ Red Green

  7. #37
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    we go hunting in east texas and it's just like that. at the dinner people will be showing off a gun outside and no one freaks out. comments like "my husband, he just got a new gun and just has to show it off" and "men, they just have to play with their toys "

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHEC724 View Post
    The solution is still acreage.

    For those of you on limited budget, approaching retirement and willing to relocate, just google "cheap land" (or anything like that). There are some amazing deals out there right now. If the economy worsens, you'll be glad for your perimeter - if it improves, you'll be glad about the wonderful deal you got when the market was at its bottom.

    I'm starting to prefer quantity over quality for my retirement nest, and will likely surround myself with swampland.

    Disclaimer: Since that sounded a little like an infomercial, I feel obligated to state that I am not an agent, nor broker, nor looking to sell anyone anything.
    I have one caveat on this plan of buying acreage. When growing up in a small town of 1,200 in the Catskill area of NY, everybody had large amounts of property. My father had a tiny amount of only 10 acres, many others had 50, 100, 200 or more acres. What happened is that the NY City crowd kept creeping outward until they were settling in our area. They immediately got involved in the city, town, and county government as it is their desire to make "Changes" to want isn't broken. To get their hands on the land, they removed the agriculture zoning and started taxing the land as suburban real estate. So a farmer with 200 acres in the family for over a hundred years was suddenly faced with a $500,000 tax bill. His property was taken for failure to pay taxes and that was that. Over and over we watched it happen. My Dad moved out of that area in the early 70's and it was pretty much ruined. So be careful about large amounts of "Taxable" land. I suggest that you have it surveyed into 2 parcels, one of 5-10 acres with your house on it, and the rest as a separate deed. Then you can always sell off the larger acreage and still keep your home.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by oneshot View Post
    :SNIP:
    Same deal, people buy a piece of land, build a house, south of Lansing 20-30 miles, then all of a sudden begin complaining about the pig farm 4 parcels away........DUMB BELLS!!!!!!!!!!!
    Maybe ten years back a family bought a nice patch of land and built a huge fancy house on it. The next year they tried to get the Sheriff to arrest the farmer because the chaff coming off his combine was blowing into their yard. They had told the farmer earlier that he needed to wait till the wind was blowing away from them before harvesting his wheat.
    He politely refused their offer so they called in the troops lol.

    Michael

  10. #40
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    We live out in the country 30 minutes to closest grocery store so not the sticks but close..

    We built our house in a 77ac "neighboorhood" there are only 4 houses out there and were all about as far from one another as possible. But here recently they have begun pre building houses directly across the street from my house, which im un happy about but i guess that is life.

    The problem comes in though when the builder/owner (he picked up the land cheap when they origanal guy died hoping to make a few dollars on the land/houses) stops at my house and informs me I must quit shooting on MY land because I am scaring away future buyers. I have a built back stop that will stop anything I own, and plenty big enough not to miss. I aksed on what grounds he thinks he can come on my property and tell me what to do...He didnt know how to reply so i informed him it was perfectly legal to shoot where we are with a proper set up, which i have.

    Lucky me im involved with the all the town meetings I can possibly make it to and have yet to hear anything else about it but i am waiting for it to come up and I fully intend to fight it with everything I have. Also I have the support of the others out there who enjoy shooting with me quite often.

    And its not just me that shoots out there on any given weekend at about 8am there are shots all around so say i quit (which im not going to) what about every other person that lives out that way. I know the 3 other families by me will fight and im sure others will as well.
    IGNORANT=NEEDS EDUCATION

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  11. #41
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    About 5 miles from where my folks lived when I was in Highschool was the city dump. The surrounding land was cheap and houses were built accutully ringing the back edge overlooking the dump. There is a push now to close the dump because of the smell and it's unsightlyness. The large stinking hole has been there for 40yrs, but you did'nt notice it untill you bought that McMansion...
    After hearing these stories, I'm glad that my closest neighber is 1/2 mile away...
    "The millions of people, armed in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us." Patrick Henry 1775

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  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by oneshot View Post
    Yeah. City folk can be a real peculiar breed .

    Two instances that stick out in my mind are these.

    In St Clair Co. Mi, (by me), some ding dong moves out to the country, dirt road and whatnot, and then starts complaining to the township that her elderly neighbor lady needed to start mowing her field full of noxious weeds{10 or 15 acres) because it was causing her allergies to run out of control.

    AND this one is a real beaut;

    Same deal, people buy a piece of land, build a house, south of Lansing 20-30 miles, then all of a sudden begin complaining about the pig farm 4 parcels away........DUMB BELLS!!!!!!!!!!!
    Not sure this is a city/country issue as much as it is a dip stick issue. These same dip sticks will, in the metro area, but land right next to a small airport that has been there since God created dirt and b***h about the noise and get the airport shut down. America has a squeaky wheel problem. Instead if greasing these squeaks, we need to let them wear out then rust.
    It's the Land of Opportunity, not the Land of Entitlements - Vote America!!!

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  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by RKflorida View Post
    I have one caveat on this plan of buying acreage. When growing up in a small town of 1,200 in the Catskill area of NY, everybody had large amounts of property. My father had a tiny amount of only 10 acres, many others had 50, 100, 200 or more acres. What happened is that the NY City crowd kept creeping outward until they were settling in our area. They immediately got involved in the city, town, and county government as it is their desire to make "Changes" to want isn't broken. To get their hands on the land, they removed the agriculture zoning and started taxing the land as suburban real estate. So a farmer with 200 acres in the family for over a hundred years was suddenly faced with a $500,000 tax bill. His property was taken for failure to pay taxes and that was that. Over and over we watched it happen. My Dad moved out of that area in the early 70's and it was pretty much ruined. So be careful about large amounts of "Taxable" land. I suggest that you have it surveyed into 2 parcels, one of 5-10 acres with your house on it, and the rest as a separate deed. Then you can always sell off the larger acreage and still keep your home.
    That is a terribly sad story RK, and I've seen it first hand as well. When I first got into real estate investments, it naturally drew me into local politics. At first, I thought it was wise to buddy-up with them, but then found that many had their hand sticking out, blatantly asking for bribes to either make things easy for me, or to keep things from getting tough on me. I met with a senior official to discuss these examples of blatant corruption and she explained that this was "just how it works". At least in South Carolina, politics are corrupt all the way from the bottom up, regardless of the political party or who is elected. It is a long-standing tradition that is not likely to change. The worse corruption tends to be at the bottom. They tend to get cleaner as they go up in office, but always turn a blind eye to what's going on underneath them. I really don't think it is a problem unique to my beloved state.

    I've had land condemned and lost significant sums because I "wouldn't play ball". Now my strategy is to stay off their radar. I form LLC's to make purchases - this gives me both protection in liability, but also a level of blessed anonymity.

    I've earned my tin foil hat the hard way. It may be on a little too tight, but I can easily envision the day of when concepts such as "imminent domain" are expanded to where the government (and I'm not just talking about bureaucrats in suits -I'm talking about the elected goober that may be your next door neighbor) can confiscate just about whatever they want, as long as it falls under the definition of what's "good for the people".

    Caveat emptor.

    Oh, and "Illegitimi non carborundum".
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  14. #44
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    I believe we have a "right to farm" law here, IOW if someone moves here after me and don't like something about my farming operation then that's too bad.

    We live on a good sized piece of property, I don't have much worries about neighbors encroaching on me. We don't have sidewalks, cable tv, etc, but it's a trade-off for other good things we have or can do.

    I'm thankful, but I am concerned about the potential cultural changes in rural life/small towns.
    Turn the election's in 2014 to a "2A Revolution". It will serve as a 1994 refresher not to "infringe" on our Second Amendment. We know who they are now.........SEND 'EM HOME. Our success in this will be proportional to how hard we work to make it happen.

  15. #45
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    I stick to the city. Anytime I am in a small town setting I have no idea what to do with myself after a day or two. I was never taught to hunt, fish, etc. so if there is no XBOX or cable I have nothing to do.

    Last time I went to a small town everyone was speaking finnish. Talk about out of place.

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