Please check your C0 detector now, or get one

This is a discussion on Please check your C0 detector now, or get one within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; I think our C0 detector just saved us. I felt foolish when I phoned the non-emergency number for our fire department to report a CO ...

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Thread: Please check your C0 detector now, or get one

  1. #1
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    Please check your C0 detector now, or get one

    I think our C0 detector just saved us.

    I felt foolish when I phoned the non-emergency number for our fire department to report a CO alarm goig off. I was certain that it was just a malfunctioning detector. It wasn't. It was real.

    They spent half an hour checking everything in our house and identified the source; a malfunctioning
    burner on our stove top. At least it wasn't the furnace.

    It was flat out flabbergasting to see how much C0 a clean looking flame was dumping and how far the CO
    spread throughout a fairly large house. When they arrived and got an initial reading I thought for sure the only place that amount could be coming from was the furnace. Wrong.

    Check your CO or get one installed. Get a couple.

    A very nice building inspector once commented to me on a furnace issue, "I don't want you to wake up dead." Me neither.
    If the Union is once severed, the line of separation will grow wider and wider, and the controversies which are now debated and settled in the halls of legislation will then be tried in fields of battle and determined by the sword.
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  3. #2
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    Good reminder. The gas company, FD or plumber would prefer a call from the owner than the first welfare check responder.

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    Member Array Cory1022's Avatar
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    How many parts per million, do you know? I do a lot of CO calls, they went through the roof after our October winter storm. We are still seeing people do things like put generators in the basement. CHANGE YOUR BATTERY like you change the smoke detector batteries, twice a year! Glad you folks are OK, kudos for not blowing off the alarm and calling the FD. It's what we're there for, and we don't like the alternative.

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    Member Array Eaglebeak's Avatar
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    I'm glad to hear everything turned out OK, and the little detector proved its merit.

    Being an old retired fire chief, I have a central-mounted CO detector even though I live in a total electric home simply because there have been many instances where a small smoldering fire in a couch or mattress will trigger a CO detector before the actual smoke detectors sound off.

    As mentioned, faithfully change the batteries in all of them at least once a year and do a test-button check on each one at least once a month.

    Everybody tends to forget their smoke and CO detectors because they just hang there and do nothing - well except for the one near the kitchen that goes off every evening to let me know dinner is ready (have to change the battery in that one every month)

    However, regard them in the same light as you regard your weapon because both of them can save your life, and both of them must work perfectly when they're needed.
    Cory1022 likes this.

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    Smoke detectors and CO detectors, the best insurance you can buy.
    When you have to shoot, shoot. Don't talk.
    "Don't forget, incoming fire has the right of way."

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    Senior Member Array Cold Shot's Avatar
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    I just moved and I've been meaning to get one. Does anybody recommend any brands?
    marcclarke likes this.

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    Member Array DanDglassman's Avatar
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    Also don't forget that the units (CO and smoke) have a sensor with a minute amount of radioactive material as part of the sensor. This "runs down" over time and, hence you should replace the detectors themselves every 10 years.
    Eaglebeak and Cory1022 like this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DanDglassman View Post
    Also don't forget that the units (CO and smoke) have a sensor with a minute amount of radioactive material as part of the sensor. This "runs down" over time and, hence you should replace the detectors themselves every 10 years.
    Thank you for the reminder, I need to check the dates on mine.
    When you have to shoot, shoot. Don't talk.
    "Don't forget, incoming fire has the right of way."

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    Senior Member Array adric22's Avatar
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    I don't have a CO alarm. I'm guessing since my house doesn't have natural gas, they were never installed.
    "Good people do not need laws to tell them to act responsibly, while bad people will find a way around the laws." -Plato

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    Glad that you're OK there Hopyard.

    My Mom is suffering the effects of long term Carbon Monoxide exposure. The plumber that installed her new boiler never screwed the exhaust duct work sections together with sheet metal screws. The sections were just force-fit together and multiple expansion/contractions caused one section to move apart from the one that went into the chimney.
    My Mom really never went into the basement but, the gases (warm air rises) were venting up to the rest of the house through an unused laundry chute.
    We had a detector w/ a fresh battery installed at the top of the basement stairs but, it was factory defective as was determined by the fire department.

    At the hospital they thought they could sort of negate the effects of the CO with lots of Oxygen but, it really didn't help or maybe she would have been even worse without it.

    Now my Mom has trouble constructing her sentences and participating in normal conversation. The effects are permanent.

    I should add that the fire department & medics were great. They got her out and on Oxygen right away and vented out the entire house and their work was professional and exemplary but, her exposure was really severe.

    She had been dizzy for weeks but, it was assumed that it was due to her new medication.

    So...carefully check your heating system folks.

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    Sorry to hear about your Mother, QK.

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    Thanks Rock & Glock.
    Liberty Over Tyranny Μολὼν λαβέ

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    Senior Member Array sdprof's Avatar
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    I'm adding these in addition to the wired smoke detectors that were installed in my house:
    First Alert SCO501CN-3ST - combination smoke and CO, wirelessly connect to other similar models.

    Dang Amazon, I bought one last month, now they've dropped the price $22.
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    Hopyard, I'm sorry to hear about your mom because I've seen the sad long-term effects of CO poisoning too many times in the past.

    Many don't understand the effects of carbon monoxide poisoning and just how devistating it is to the brain. Without getting too technical, hemoglobin in the blood's red cells picks up oxygen molecules (O2) as it passes through the lining of the lungs and transports it to all the body's cells (especially the brain); this provides each cell with "burnable/oxidizing" oxygen to combine with the fuel (simple dextrose from metabolized food) to "burn" for energy that sustains body heat and keeps the cells alive. When the blood (and cells) are deprived of O2 oxygen molecules (smothering, heart failure, etc.), body cells begin to quickly die - and brain cells begin a massive die-off after only six minutes of oxygen deprivation.

    Sadly, the blood's hemoglobin has a much greater affinity for the O1 atom (in carbon monoxide) than it does for the O2 molecule that's present in the air we normally breathe. While the red cells can quickly transfer their "load" of O2 molecules to the cells, the O1 atom does not transfer to the cells and keeps the hemoglobin's "Chevy pickup bed" fully loaded and unable to pickup another load of O2 when it passes through the lungs again - even though pure 02 may be present at 100% in the lungs from medically applied oxygen.

    Therefore, as more CO is taken into the lungs, the more red cells become "full" of O1 on the long-term and completely incapacitated to carry any O2 regardless of how much may be present. In effect, it's no different than slowly smothering or a heart attack that keeps reducing oxygen supply to the brain - which, in turn, causes irrepairable brain damage or death as the blood's O2 level continues to drop and brain cells continue dying off.

    CO is really bad stuff, and the cheap price of a detector is most certainly "an ounce of prevention is worth 20 tons of cure".

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    Good wishes for a quick recovery for your mom QK.
    Fortune favors the bold.

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    The thing about "defense" is that it has practically nothing to do with guns. (As passed on by CCW9MM)

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