buck a gallon gasoline...

buck a gallon gasoline...

This is a discussion on buck a gallon gasoline... within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; At least that is what they say here, but then we add a buck in taxes at the pump... (federal is about 53 cents and ...

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Thread: buck a gallon gasoline...

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array Sheldon J's Avatar
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    buck a gallon gasoline...

    At least that is what they say here, but then we add a buck in taxes at the pump... (federal is about 53 cents and Michigan is about 48 cents).

    Pssst: Itís Still About a Buck a Gallon

    Now if we could just stop the commodities brokers from driving the price of crude from the $48 a barrel it actually costs...
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    Senior Member Array The Fish's Avatar
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    It's very appropriate that you put $1/gallon gas in the Humor section.
    If we had a fantasy section,it would be even better!!!!!
    Redline likes this.
    " Keep On Packin' On The Bimah"

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    Senior Member Array adric22's Avatar
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    The article is pretty much written by an idiot.

    Yes.. we have reached Peak Oil. Most industry experts believe it. But most people just don't understand what that actually means. Most of you guys probably know, but just to make sure.. There's plenty of oil left. It will last us for hundreds of years or more. But we've reached the point where it has become almost impossible to produce more oil per year than we did in 2008. Had the economy not taken a nose-dive and demand had stayed at that all-time high, supply would have become constricted and the price would have continued to rise. We'd probably be at $5 per gallon by now.

    Yes.. there are definitely other economic and political issues affecting the price of oil. But to say that peak oil is a scam, that is just somebody who is an idiot or in denial.
    "Good people do not need laws to tell them to act responsibly, while bad people will find a way around the laws." -Plato

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    Too much politics and greedy companies for that to ever happen.

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    Quote Originally Posted by adric22 View Post
    The article is pretty much written by an idiot.

    Yes.. we have reached Peak Oil. Most industry experts believe it. But most people just don't understand what that actually means. Most of you guys probably know, but just to make sure.. There's plenty of oil left. It will last us for hundreds of years or more. But we've reached the point where it has become almost impossible to produce more oil per year than we did in 2008. Had the economy not taken a nose-dive and demand had stayed at that all-time high, supply would have become constricted and the price would have continued to rise. We'd probably be at $5 per gallon by now.

    Yes.. there are definitely other economic and political issues affecting the price of oil. But to say that peak oil is a scam, that is just somebody who is an idiot or in denial.
    Right, because there is no way that we could dig a few more wells or build another refinery or two.

    The EPA and environmental lobbies are the reasons we are at "peak" oil production. We have tied one hand behind our back and then we complain that we can't get the job done.
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    Senior Member Array adric22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by atctimmy View Post
    Right, because there is no way that we could dig a few more wells or build another refinery or two.

    The EPA and environmental lobbies are the reasons we are at "peak" oil production. We have tied one hand behind our back and then we complain that we can't get the job done.
    While it is true, that building a few more refineries and oil wells would allow us to increase production temporarily, lets face it.. oil is a finite resource. Some of it is easy to get to, some of it is hard to get to. Obviously, we've already gotten most of the easy stuff. The further we go along, the harder and harder it will be to get more oil.

    But also keep in mind that the oil companies have no reason to increase production. That would increase supply and lower the cost of oil. Why sell a bunch of the stuff cheaply, when you can sell less of it for more? That is why they closed down some of the refineries a few decades ago and never re-opened them.

    But on the same token, the oil companies don't want the price to go to high either. Because they know we would ween ourselves off of it in favor of cheaper alternative fuels. So, much like a drug dealer, they try to keep us hooked on the stuff.
    "Good people do not need laws to tell them to act responsibly, while bad people will find a way around the laws." -Plato

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    VIP Member Array mcp1810's Avatar
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    Oh, but let's not just blame the oil companies and the tree huggers, you and I are to blame too!
    In 1978 a Z-28 Camaro had a 350 cubic inch engine with a four barrel carburetor making 195 horse power (stock) and that was a "performance" car and got maybe fifteen miles per gallon. While todays Camaros do get better mileage they also crank out a lot more horsepower. Heck, the base V-6 in todays Camaro cranks out 323 horsepower. What kind of mileage could we get with modern technology and an engine tuned to make 200 horse power?

    For years GM argued against bringing out the small Duramax Diesel engine because no one would buy it. And Ford would not sell the 50mpg Focus Eco-tech in the U.S. because "Americans wont buy Diesel cars." That of course is news to Volkswagon who can't build them fast enought for the U.S. market.
    Fuel consumption is improving in this country at a snail's pace only because of government interference. If it were market driven it would happen a lot faster.
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    Ex Member Array Bullet1234's Avatar
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    The single largest entity impacting the world's oil supplies is the Organization
    of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), a consortium of 13 countries:
    Algeria, Angola, Ecuador, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria,
    Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Venezuela. Until the USA
    does SOMETHING ,,,,,, pipeline from Canada ,,,,, drilling our own,,,,, OPEC
    is in the DRIVER'S seat. And we KNOW WHAT OBAMA ,,,, DID TO THE PIPELINE.

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    The cost of gasoline and Diesel fuel for our vehicles is dramatically influenced by supply and demand. We actually have more known oil resources than ever before in the history of man; it's no longer a matter of driving a pipe into the ground and sucking oil out, but we have the technology and the means to get oil from shale and tar sands at an affordable price.

    The biggest obstacle to a lower price for our vehicles' fuels is the lack of refinery capacity. Capacity has just not kept up with the increased demand. In the past 25 years or so, no new refineries have been built in the United States, and the only increases in capacity have come through improvements in refinery efficiences and some expansion of existing facilities. You can lay some of that at the doorstep of the EPA with their incredibly restrictive policies, and some of that can be blamed on the NIMBY (Not In My Back Yard) types (you know, the ones who want better cell phone coverage but don't want a cell tower within sight of their home). But a lot has to do with the enormous investment required to build new refineries and the reluctance of the refiners to invest (gamble) in what may become excess capacity.
    Smitty
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    Quote Originally Posted by adric22 View Post
    While it is true, that building a few more refineries and oil wells would allow us to increase production temporarily, lets face it.. oil is a finite resource. Some of it is easy to get to, some of it is hard to get to. Obviously, we've already gotten most of the easy stuff. The further we go along, the harder and harder it will be to get more oil.

    But also keep in mind that the oil companies have no reason to increase production. That would increase supply and lower the cost of oil. Why sell a bunch of the stuff cheaply, when you can sell less of it for more? That is why they closed down some of the refineries a few decades ago and never re-opened them.

    But on the same token, the oil companies don't want the price to go to high either. Because they know we would ween ourselves off of it in favor of cheaper alternative fuels. So, much like a drug dealer, they try to keep us hooked on the stuff.
    You Sir have bought into the lie. You are spouting the company line. There are billions and billions of barrels easily accessible and available to us. We have enough "easy" oil located to last for another 60 to 80 years. In fact, scientists are starting to think that the Earth produces more oil than we once thought and we may not run our supplies dry for centuries. There are only two reasons that gas is expensive.

    1. The Arab nations control most of the oil and they know that oil/money is power. OPEC causes self imposed shortages by pumping less oil to cause demand/prices to rise.

    2. Our unwillingness to build more refineries in the US.

    End of story. We are not running out of oil and we have not even come close to the "peak" of what could be produced if, in fact, we actually decided to produce.
    Sheldon J and JoJoGunn like this.
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  11. #11
    VIP Member Array Sheldon J's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gasmitty View Post
    The cost of gasoline and Diesel fuel for our vehicles is dramatically influenced by supply and demand. We actually have more known oil resources than ever before in the history of man; it's no longer a matter of driving a pipe into the ground and sucking oil out, but we have the technology and the means to get oil from shale and tar sands at an affordable price.

    The biggest obstacle to a lower price for our vehicles' fuels is the lack of refinery capacity. Capacity has just not kept up with the increased demand. In the past 25 years or so, no new refineries have been built in the United States, and the only increases in capacity have come through improvements in refinery efficiences and some expansion of existing facilities. You can lay some of that at the doorstep of the EPA with their incredibly restrictive policies, and some of that can be blamed on the NIMBY (Not In My Back Yard) types (you know, the ones who want better cell phone coverage but don't want a cell tower within sight of their home). But a lot has to do with the enormous investment required to build new refineries and the reluctance of the refiners to invest (gamble) in what may become excess capacity.
    No so much... recent news stories have national gasoline and oil reserves at near an all time high...
    "The sword dose not cause the murder, and the maker of the sword dose not bear sin" Rabbi Solomon ben Isaac 11th century

  12. #12
    VIP Member Array oakchas's Avatar
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    Shoot, I thought this was about cheap gas... Back in the day, I sold gasoline for $0.35 a gallon... and when we were having gas wars, it got down to $0.19... and yes there were federal and state taxes on that gas.

    Right now our refineries are exporting gasoline to other countries, because our demand has dropped so much due to the stagnant economy.
    Rats!
    It could be worse!
    I suppose

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