Emergency Services (Fire, Police, EMT): Do you check ID braclets?

This is a discussion on Emergency Services (Fire, Police, EMT): Do you check ID braclets? within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Someone sent me a link to those survival strap thingies and I was checking them out and saw they made medical alert bracelets. I don't ...

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Thread: Emergency Services (Fire, Police, EMT): Do you check ID braclets?

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    Emergency Services (Fire, Police, EMT): Do you check ID braclets?

    Someone sent me a link to those survival strap thingies and I was checking them out and saw they made medical alert bracelets.

    I don't have any allergies or anything and neither do my children but it got me thinking about all the medical alert stuff some people carry or put on their phone or key chains, etc. I've heard of people putting In Case of Emergency (ICE) apps on their phones with all of their medical information so that if/when emergency services arrive they can check their phone and find all they need, but I can't see a fire fighter sitting there with someone's cell phone digging through it for information. Am I wrong?

    Do you actually look at them?

    If you do, what are you more likely to look at? Bracelet? Necklace? Phone? Key Chain? Tattoo (I've actually seen Medical Alert Tattoos)?

    Are they worth the money people put into them?

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    Ex Member Array barstoolguru's Avatar
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    if my house is burning down and someone has a fire hose in their hands; the last thing I am thinking "is this guy a real fireman"

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    JD
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    Quote Originally Posted by barstoolguru View Post
    if my house is burning down and someone has a fire hose in their hands; the last thing I am thinking "is this guy a real fireman"

    I think you're missing the point of the question...

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    Quote Originally Posted by barstoolguru View Post
    if my house is burning down and someone has a fire hose in their hands; the last thing I am thinking "is this guy a real fireman"
    What??????

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    To the guru...

    YeS I aLwAys CheCk tHE I.D. Of PeopLE trYing To rEsCUe me. I HaVe doNe ThiS SINce I WaS AbduCTEd By AlIENS A LonG TiME AGo. FoOl Me OnCE ShaME ON yOU. TheY'lL NeVeR FoOL Me AgAin!

    And on a serious note, I don't have a need for such a bracelet... But I'm curious if the first responders look as well... and what determines when they look at your cel phone for info?
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    Oh my... [facepalm]

    For the uninitiated: Medic Alert

    Lots of thoughts, but to keep things succinct:
    • -Should they get checked for? Absolutely. Are we trained to look for alert jewelry? Yes. Does it always happen in practice? Not right away.

    • -In an emergent situation with an unconscious patient, a good medic will have the pt naked by the time they hit the ED. Jewelry is much more likely to get noticed than a tattoo unless it's truly distinct. Especially as ink gets more and more common... (Also, "DNR" tattooed on your chest will still get you worked until we have an MD signed order in our hands.)

    • -Medical personnel don't have time to look through phones. If we find one, we might hand it to an officer if there's one handy. If you're still a John Doe when you get to the ER, someone there can look through it and contact family. They may look for ICE info, or may just browse the recent calls for "Mom," "Sis," etc. Irrelevant if your phone is locked with a pin # like mine. More likely than not, state police will just run your license and find next-of-kin. Especially after the mixup with the Taylor University girls, we leave ID'ing up to the police.

    • -If you do have a serious allergy or disease, it is definitely worth the $20 to let us know up front what we're dealing with. Most medics will get to a low blood sugar in a diabetic pretty quickly, but I've seen cases where other things were ruled out first and it took longer.

    • -Bracelets/necklaces are also handy for the first responders. Our local PD had SRT put CS into a erratic driver's truck after he refused to get out. Only after that did they approach and find that he was diabetic and nearly unconscious. Thankfully, he was quickly treated and transported. Too often though diabetics are mistaken for drunks as behavior can be similar. (Yes, the majority of bracelets are worn by diabetics in my experience... due to sheer prevalence.)

    • -Keychains are too easily separated and not noticeable. Last resort.
    Last edited by JD; February 15th, 2012 at 01:41 PM.
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    Member Array MnemonicMonkey's Avatar
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    One more point...

    In the event of a vehicle rollover, stuff goes EVERYWHERE. Your purse/phone/wallet etc may end up 150' out into a cornfield to be plowed under next spring. Not as reliable as a bracelet/necklace for people that need to communicate vital background info, as it has a higher likelihood of staying with you.
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    Ex Member Array barstoolguru's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JD View Post
    I think you're missing the point of the question...
    sorry I guess I did.....Emergency Services (Fire, Police, EMT): Do you check ID bracelets?.... I thought he was asking if they are real emergency responders. My bad, I need to up my Prozac

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    As an EMT for 12 years now one thing we are taught during our basic patient assessment is to check for medic alert items on the neck or wrist. Have not seen any medical tattoos yet. I'm diabetic and I wear a necklace and in my wallet I have a Medical ID card that is the size of a credit card and has a 1 GB USB plug in with my complete medical info and history. My wallet has a sticker on the outside of it so medical personnel will know to check inside my wallet. My Medical Director loves the idea. He can plug it in to any computer and get all my medical info. If the patient is unable to speak or unconscious these Medical Alerts items can literally be a life saver.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MnemonicMonkey View Post
    One more point...

    In the event of a vehicle rollover, stuff goes EVERYWHERE. Your purse/phone/wallet etc may end up 150' out into a cornfield to be plowed under next spring. Not as reliable as a bracelet/necklace for people that need to communicate vital background info, as it has a higher likelihood of staying with you.
    I know many EMTs train for this... But you would be AMAZED how disoriented you become trying to retrieve things from an inverted vehicle... Wife inverted her car in an accident... she was unharmed... Called me to come get her... could not find her phone so walked 1/4 mile uphill on the same ice that flipped her car to nearest farm house...

    Anyway the point is this... nothing in a car is where it ought to be if the car is rolled, and even if it all stays inside the car, if the car is inverted a regular civilian will have a "fun house at the fair" time locating belongings in the car.

    Think about this if you secure your weapon anywhere in the vehicle but in it's holster on your person...
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    I should add that there are also waterproof Medic Alert type USB flash drives on necklaces that can contain a persons entire medical history in detail.
    Of course the Paramedics wouldn't bother with it but, they would make hospital personnel aware of it I'm sure.
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    I will answer.....YES, we do check for them
    I've found them more than once on persons called in as DUI and almost forcibly removed them from the vehicle, but they were found to be diabetic since I found the sweet smell in the car and checked their wrist....sure 'nuff have a medic alert bracelet showing they are diabetic....at that point I call off the backups and get medical ASAP,
    fortunately the few times they've wrecked their car nobody was hurt, and most of the time we get them stopped before they wreck and find they are diabetic; I'd rather find them all day then it be drunks killing people, but I digress.....

    I've also found medic bracelets on medical calls where person has passed out in restaurant, house, store, etc, its good since we get to radio fire/ambulance ASAP so they have info before coming on scene

    as far as ICE contacts setup in the phone, the phones are looked at but usually its when (unfortunately) something bad has happened (homicide, agg assault or other injuries where persons are severely injured/might die and we're trying to contact family, etc
    here ambulance/fire do not look at phones for medical info, they assess, do their thing, and get to ER

    posts here add good info....if you are going to get a medic alert item, make it something that is on your person--bracelet, necklace, etc
    since, as mentioned, in a car wreck its a yard sale, items all over car, scattered who knows how far sometimes
    we had a 18-wheeler vs jeep vs pedestrian on the interstate here and the debris field was over 600 yards long
    just something to keep in mind
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    Senior Member Array DMan's Avatar
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    Absolutely we check. Not just bracelets but necklaces, even wallets and purses if it is a life threatening situation. Many elderly carry medication lists in their wallets and purses simply because they may have difficulty remembering them. Those lists helps identify diseases, conditions etc that they may have.

    On person has taken what he thinks is important information (mess, next of kin, contact numbers etc) placed it between a folded piece of card stock and laminated it like a luggage tag. In an emergency they can cut it open (message on outside saying where and when to cut) and retrieve the information.
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    As far as medical identifying type tattoos, the only ones I have ever heard of that anyone really has are "Meat Tags," which are rather common in the grunts (or at least were in my unit), but it is more gallows humor than anything. Because when you have dog tags around your neck and in your boot, its a lot easier to get to.

    I don't have any major allergies or medical issues, but if I did, I'd much rather spend the $20 bucks and never need it, than take the chance I really, really need someone to know that info and not have it on my person.
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    Quote Originally Posted by barstoolguru View Post
    sorry I guess I did.....Emergency Services (Fire, Police, EMT): Do you check ID bracelets?.... I thought he was asking if they are real emergency responders. My bad, I need to up my Prozac
    Heh. I was thinking maybe you should hop off the bar stool a few hours before you go to posting next time.
    The preceding post may contain sarcasm; it's just better that way. However, it is still intended with construction and with the Love of my L-rd Y'shua.

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