What's up with this new job description I've been seeing: EMT/Security Officer?

What's up with this new job description I've been seeing: EMT/Security Officer?

This is a discussion on What's up with this new job description I've been seeing: EMT/Security Officer? within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; The last couple years I've seen ads from all over the US for a job description of EMT (or EMT-Paramedic)/Security Officer. When I did private ...

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Thread: What's up with this new job description I've been seeing: EMT/Security Officer?

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array paramedic70002's Avatar
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    What's up with this new job description I've been seeing: EMT/Security Officer?

    The last couple years I've seen ads from all over the US for a job description of EMT (or EMT-Paramedic)/Security Officer. When I did private security 20 years ago this was unheard of, now apparently its becoming quite popular. Is there a reason for this change? Are they trying to kill 2 birds with 1 stone? I feel like a pioneer here, as I had all my Security Officers certified as First Responders as a value added feature, when I was a private security Operations Manager and volunteer EMT and EMT-Instructor. On another note, I'm sure some of these positions are armed. Some in EMS are against armed EMTs for various reasons, such as weapons retention while performing skills. Funny how the same situation has evolved from a different angle, only most private security open carries whereas armed EMS should be concealed. Thoughts?
    "Each worker carried his sword strapped to his side." Nehemiah 4:18

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  2. #2
    Senior Member Array Inspector71's Avatar
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    I don't know about the EMT part, but I have been seeing a lot of advertising for armed security guards in my area lately. I just thought maybe some places were hiring night watchmen.
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    It's the world we live in, now. Like you said, kill two birds with one stone. Even if you have to pay that EMT/Security position more than either separately, it will still be cheaper that paying for one of each. As the saying goes, more bang for your buck.

    As for armed or not, I don't know enough on the matter to discuss.
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    VIP Member Array boricua's Avatar
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    Half of my staff must be certified SOs (unarmed) and are required to pass 1st Aid/CPR (not EMT). I have not seen any job ads for EMT/Security combination, yet, but I see the benefits of having them.
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    VIP Member Array paramedic70002's Avatar
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    https://www.facebook.com/notes/get-e...50722010313678

    Here's the first one I've seen pop up since I posted this thread. Usually one or two a week.
    "Each worker carried his sword strapped to his side." Nehemiah 4:18

    Guns Save Lives. Paramedics Save Lives. But...
    Paramedics With Guns Scare People!

  6. #6
    Distinguished Member Array BigStick's Avatar
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    Makes sense. If you are going to have a security guard on duty, you may as well have an EMT also. Protect your staff/personnel from bad guys and nature at the same time.

    I could see a conlict of interest though if the armed guard has to shoot a bad guy, and then would be ?obligated? to assist him. This would bring him in contact and add the potential for retaliation from the criminal for being shot. There would have to be some very clear and specific company policy on expectations and duties when dealing with such sittuations. Companies would definitly need a lawyer to look into the technicalities before making that happen.
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  7. #7
    Distinguished Member Array INccwchris's Avatar
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    Its becoming standard procedure in many areas that have large industrial and medical testing laboratories to have their own private security patrol and private fire service employees. Most of those personnel will pull a shift as a patrol officer, then a shift as a firefighter, then a **** as an EMT. The whole point in doing this is so that there is a response staff on site fully trained to contain their own emergencies. Local examples of that are Lilly's, and an oil refinery up north that use security/first response officers. They are trained in law enforcement style tactics, as well as firefighting and EMT certs so that they can run their own small city. They also call in IFD or IMPD at times, but for the most part those complexes run themselves. The biggest company that does this style of security is Securitas.
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    Senior Member Array CanuckQue's Avatar
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    The security officer job is a prime job for value-added training while employed. A terrific number of sites offer the opportunity to study while working, and offering employees the incentive to study really creates greater opportunities for everyone. You can rotate new employees through the vanilla sites, too, while they take courses that make them better.
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    Around here (in the middle of nowhere) often the first person to arrive at a scene is alone for 18-20 minutes. Anyone with serious medical issues or need for law enforcement can be in BIG doo doo while waiting for the other to respond. They apparently tried to make it mandatory that there be a complete EMT class at the Police Academy but that didn't fly because of cost. However, they do apparently have a more comprehensive medical section than most states require. I agree that it's the killing two birds with one stone thing. If you have a trained EMT/officer he or she does not have to wait until the other arrives to start controlling the situation or providing basic life support. Lives can be saved. Paramedic/Officers are demi-gods around here.

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    VIP Member Array mcp1810's Avatar
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    Most of the postings like that I get are for overseas work. Basically it is to be a corpsman/medic for a contractor in Iraq/Afghanistan.
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    There is a State run mental hospital in my hometown who required it's Security Force to be at least EMT's. This was 25+ years ago.

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    Back when I was in the PD academy the big (new) thinking was Public safety officer. EMT/LEO as one job. It didn't seem to carry on for long though, however we were all Basic First Responder trained/certified as well as typical Pd training.
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    Member Array Harry25's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rocky View Post
    Back when I was in the PD academy the big (new) thinking was Public safety officer. EMT/LEO as one job. It didn't seem to carry on for long though, however we were all Basic First Responder trained/certified as well as typical Pd training.
    PSO is big around my parts. It's LEO/FF here with a private company running the EMS side.


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