It's 95° here- I think of my Grandpa- he didn't have electricity, running water, etc. - Page 3

It's 95° here- I think of my Grandpa- he didn't have electricity, running water, etc.

This is a discussion on It's 95° here- I think of my Grandpa- he didn't have electricity, running water, etc. within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Thanks Tangle, great read. Reflection of years gone by can really warm the heart. Being a child of foster care, I envy you and your ...

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 31 to 36 of 36
Like Tree50Likes

Thread: It's 95° here- I think of my Grandpa- he didn't have electricity, running water, etc.

  1. #31
    VIP Member Array gottabkiddin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    North Georgia
    Posts
    7,042
    Thanks Tangle, great read. Reflection of years gone by can really warm the heart. Being a child of foster care, I envy you and your memories my friend. Your grandparents sound like they were wonderful, and hard working folks. Just a thought though; I'd have made sure my jacket and clothes hung somewhere else besides that one closet where the toilet found its home.
    "He that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one." – Luke 22:36

    "If a law is unjust, a man is not only right to disobey it, he is obligated to do so." – Thomas Jefferson


  2. #32
    Lead Moderator
    Array rstickle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Laurel, MD
    Posts
    21,977
    Quote Originally Posted by tclance View Post
    We dont realize how easy we have it today. After 3-4 days hunting in a camp you sure begin to miss the comforts of home. By the way I can see the Sears catalog but a CORN COB OUCH!!!!
    I can see you missed the part about the bucket of water in the outhouse. That was to SOAK the corn cobs, makes then soft! Now how "city slickers" used their corn cobs is up to them, but a soaked cob was sure softer than a glossy page of the sears catalog.
    Rick

    EOD - Initial success or total failure

  3. #33
    VIP Member Array HKinNY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Nassau, NY(Long Island)
    Posts
    2,855
    My Grandma (Bubbie) had a biceps that would make most state champion arm wrestlers to shame. The lady would scrub pots and pans until here was a mirror like shine.

    She had better hand motor skills than a plastic surgeon she would mend clothes like nobody business.
    You do not know, what you do not know, until you realize that you do not know it

  4. #34
    VIP Member Array packinnova's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    4,316
    Quote Originally Posted by Caertaker View Post
    Being more or less raised by my Grandmother I often wondered how they did it. I have been to our ancestrial farm in the South as a child and walked through the sharecropper houses that at the time were still standing. They were nothing more than rough sawn planks on small stone piers. No insulation, no drywall no electrical wires. My grandmother was always quick to point out that she never lived in one of those houses - but somebody did. I became fascinated by life in the "olden days" and over the years have spent many hours quizing the oldest people I could find on the subject. I am fortunate in that I still have my Grandmother's best friend to consult. I visited her a few weeks back. She is 97 years old and lives by herself in the house she and her husband and her built from trees cleared from the site. Although not an earthshattering revelation by any means, my main conclusion from my discussions is that you do what you have to do. You may not like it. It might not be what you would have chosen but it is your path nonetheless and there's only one only way to get through it. I think many things in life are that way.

    One of the only good things to come out of the Sixties (in my opinion) was a series of books on life during earlier times. As I recall a group of sociology students encountered elders from Appalachia and realized that a way of life was becoming lost to future generations with their passing. They set about interviewing these people and documented their wisdom in what became a series of books called Foxfire. You can buy them here althought I'm sure there are other sources.

    Amazon.com: foxfire books complete set

    I found them not only an enjoyable read but highly informative. The way I see it, the lives our ancestors lead was reality, the reality of human's lives for thousands of year. Strip away our technology and it would be our reality once again. Should the SHTF it would be good to possess some of their wisdom to do what you have to do.
    I have my dads original SET! I loved reading them. I reminded me of all the conversations with my grandparents and the great grandparents when I was a kid. The horror stories of sitting in the outhouse and finding out the hard way that the hornets had made a nest under the "seat"... YEEEOUCH. Or my great grandfathers wiskey running days(those were great stories minus the getting busted by the revenuers parts )...
    I do remember my grandmother cooking on a wood stove though. Although at the time they did have electricity, but they seemed to avoid using it quite a bit.
    "My God David, We're a Civilized society."

    "Sure, As long as the machines are workin' and you can call 911. But you take those things away, you throw people in the dark, and you scare the crap out of them; no more rules...You'll see how primitive they can get."
    -The Mist (2007)

  5. #35
    Member Array boutaswell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Martinsburg, WV
    Posts
    60
    I do remember when growing up in SE Georgia that every now and then, I would have to go stay with my aunt and uncle. They didn't have much either but they did have electricity. Water was a pump on the porch. Did have a gas stove but unless baking, meals were generally cooked on a cast iron stove. I don't remember them having a fan but I do remember I had to sleep in the "backroom" in the winter. Quilts piled 6 inches high. Snug as a bug with only the nose showing. Chamber pots and outhouse. Did have a fridge though so had ice. They were pretty religious, I don't remember a radio but I was too young to care. I would have to go to church with them on Sunday and there was always the covered lunch, man, that was some good eating back then. The uncle did farming for another uncle and the aunt would do the egg collecting from the 100 or so chickens they had. Two or three times a week, they would run the "egg route" selling eggs and some veggies if they had it. It was really a simple time for me but they really had to bust their tails to make ends meet.

    Thanks for the memories Tangle
    Richard, SFC US Army (Ret)

    “Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery?
    Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!” ― Patrick Henry

  6. #36
    Senior Moderator
    Array Tangle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Chattanooga
    Posts
    9,827
    Quote Originally Posted by rstickle View Post
    I can see you missed the part about the bucket of water in the outhouse. That was to SOAK the corn cobs, makes then soft! Now how "city slickers" used their corn cobs is up to them, but a soaked cob was sure softer than a glossy page of the sears catalog.
    GAG!!! You mean that wasn't drinking water!!!!

    Just kidding.

    That's a first for me - I didn't know the corn cobs had to be soaked. Maybe my folks only used corn cobs that had been cooked and the corn eaten off them.

    And I agree - glossy ain't softy.
    I'm too young to be this old!
    Getting old isn't good for you!

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •