deer hunting

This is a discussion on deer hunting within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; i know that this is not geared towards self defense, however, i am supposed to be going deer hunting for the 1st time ever this ...

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  1. #1
    Member Array cfd335's Avatar
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    deer hunting

    i know that this is not geared towards self defense, however, i am supposed to be going deer hunting for the 1st time ever this fall. i know NOTHING about deer hunting. guns, clothing, etc. all i know is when i have had deer meat, it is good. and i hope to tag a big one so i can have his head on my wall. (if you kill it, eat it.). some advice would be appreciated, thanks.

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  3. #2
    Distinguished Member Array svgheartland's Avatar
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    I'm guessing you'll be in a stand to hunt. Make sure there's burlap or camo hanging from the shooting rail to block sight of any lower body movement. Camo clothing is advisable but you don't have to look like a Cabelas magazine shot, Army surplus will work and save some cash. Deer are color blind and youre only trying to break a pattern. If you get the bug for deer hunting, ask Santa to take you shopping.

    With all safety advise as a given, both firearm and not falling from the stand, etc here's my primary bit of advice....squeeze that trigger. Imagine that you just missed the deer of a lifetime the day before because you ripped the trigger. Breathe, settle, squeeze. If you do get a shot more often than not the deer will not drop on the spot. It does happen but usually they'll run some distance. Often it isn't far at all if you've calculated that shot properly. Don't come flying out of that stand. Be still for 5-10 minutes and then go find your deer.

    Oh there's tons more advice that you'll probably receive. But a final word; enjoy your time in the woods. For me the shot is secondary. Watching, smelling and hearing the woods around you......life is just too short. There's nothing finer. You can see animals do the strangest things from up in that stand.
    Last edited by Rock and Glock; August 19th, 2012 at 10:49 AM.
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    VIP Member Array nedrgr21's Avatar
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    You'll probably have to, and should regardless, take a hunter education class. Many questions will be answered there, including those you never thought to ask. Wear a safety harness in the stand. Spend a good amount of time shooting the rifle you are going to use. Besides safety, a well placed shot is your main responsibility. Make sure you positively id your target and that you have a safe backstop - no shooting a deer standing at the top of a hill. If you find your heart racing and the crosshairs bouncing all over, close your eyes, take 3 deep breaths, open eyes, squeeze trigger - the deer ain't going anywhere, and if it was, you wouldn't have a proper shot anyway.

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    Senior Member Array Caertaker's Avatar
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    Avoid taking "sound shots"

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    A Father's Advice
    If a sportsman true youíd be
    Listen carefully to me. . .


    Never, never let your gun
    Pointed be at anyone.
    That it may unloaded be
    Matters not the least to me.

    When a hedge or fence you cross
    Though of time it cause a loss
    From your gun the cartridge take
    For the greater safetyís sake.

    If twixt you and neighboring gun
    Bird shall fly or beast may run
    Let this maxim ere be thine
    "Follow not across the line."

    Stops and beaters oft unseen
    Lurk behind some leafy screen.
    Calm and steady always be
    "Never shoot where you canít see."

    You may kill or you may miss
    But at all times think this:
    "All the pheasants ever bred
    Wonít repay for one man dead."

    "Early Instruction"
    By Carl Kauba
    c. 1902

    Written by Mark Beaufoy of Coombe House, Shaftesbury, Dorset, England, in 1902, on presenting his eldest son, Henry Mark, with his first gun. Reproduced here by permission of the authorís granddaughter, Mrs. P. M. Guild.


    In Ohio you folks do a lot of deer drives.
    If they(your hunting buddies) put you on stand, to wait for deer being pushed to you, make sure there are no hunters behind your intended target(the deer).

    If you are hunting from a blind(still hunting) hunt primarily facing the wind, overlooking a creek bottom, river, flooded ditch and be covered in a good blind, either natural or in a pop-up, and be out there in your blind at least 1/2 hour before sun up..
    Try to get to the area to be hunted a couple of weeks prior to hunting to scout for trails, rubs(markings on trees made by bucks), and scrapes(made by bucks) and frequented by that buck, other bucks, and does that may be coming into estrous(heat), and therefore ready to breed.
    You will want to hunt 30-75 yards away from these spots, as well as frequent bedding grounds of deer after the shooting starts, as the deer will be heading to these resting spots as close to or before dark to hide out, so these are places you want to be.
    Bedding areas close to planted fields/apple orchard and other places of food sources are of great interest.
    If you are going with other seasoned hunters, listen and take advice from them, as long as they are known to be trustworthy, and are not hayshakers.

    Most of all, enjoy the "hunt camp" experience.
    The food, the practical jokes, the old age wisdoms of the oldtimers.
    That, IMHO is the most gratifiyng, and memorable of times in all my 38 years of Deer Hunting.
    If you want to make God laugh, tell him your plans.

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    Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it whether it exists or not, diagnosing it incorrectly, and applying the wrong remedy." -- Ernest Benn

  7. #6
    Member Array thephanatik's Avatar
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    To add onto what svgheartland said; If you go chasing after the dear right away, hes probably going to keep running. If you don't he'll be more likely to run a short distance and lay down. My cousin shot an elk in Colorado and it ran 20 feet and laid down. My cousin took off after it and it got back up and ran a half mile down a steep hill. He learned real quick the importance of patience. It took him half the day to drag it back up that hill.
    Your number one Option for Personal Security is a lifelong commitment to avoidance, deterrence, and de-escalation. - Rule #23 in the USMC rules for gunfighting.

  8. #7
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    Gun wise it will depend a lot on where your hunting. Some states/counties do not allow rifles. Shotgun only. If your in a location that only allows shotguns, a good 12 ga pump with 00 buck for a smooth bore, or slug for rifled barrel. A lot of makers sell combo guns that come with both smooth bore and rifle barrels. If hunting in heavy cover with limited range shots, a good 30-30 will work, more open area's with longer range shots I'd opt for a .270. Also look around for a good drag harness system, for hauling the deer out with. Deer NEVER drop close to the road! Good luck.
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    Starting out, unless you have a friend guiding you through all of it, it can seem incredibly simple ("just shoot the deer and bring it home") or completely daunting. Here are just a few things to cover before you head afield.

    Legal/administrative: do you have a hunting license and the appropriate tags for the species and area you'll be hunting? Know your state's game laws - season dates, legal shooting times (sunrise to sunset? 30 minutes before/after?), allowed gender (antlered, antlerless), permissible means of taking, tagging and check station requirements, and so on.

    Equipment: is your clothing adequate for the terrain and weather? Is fluorescent orange of a certain minimum area required? Is your weapon sighted in and are you confident in you capabilities with it? Do you know what the max effective range of you and your weapon is, i.e., the max range at which you can reliably hit a lethal zone on your game? Are you equipped to field dress your deer and get the carcass home?

    Land you'll be hunting: Is it private of public land? Be aware of any differences in the regulations for either. If private land, have you obtained permission to hunt in writing? Will there be other hunters in the same area? Do you know the land well - paths, hills, streams, food sources, bedding and cover areas? Will you scout the area in advance of the season? If you're headed to "your spot" in darkness, can you do so without breaking a leg and with minimal use of flashlights?

    Hunting technique: Learn the habits of the deer in your area, their feeding times and rest times, and general deer behavior. There is tons of stuff written about stand hunting, still hunting, stalking, and more, and depending on your circumstances you may have to employ more than one technique.

    Care of game: lastly - and this one can be critical to enjoying tasty straps and venison haunch - make sure you know how to care for your deer after it's yours. Field dressing without contaminating the meat with tarsal glands or urine, handling bloodshot meat, hanging the carcass and butchering it - all of those can make or break the enjoyment of the meat. Not to scare you, it's not rocket science, but you do want to know about these things in advance. Oh, and don't forget a good game cookbook! The LL Bean cookbook is probably my favorite, but even Joy of Cooking has a decent section on cooking wild game.

    Good luck!
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    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    Alot of excellent advice. I will add that you should enjoy the days afield. Take it all in. Take your time, for sooner or later it will all come together for you, but the success isnt what you kill, its what you learn in the process.

    Respect the land, and its treasures.

    Doe will bust you quicker than the biggest bucks. They spend the majority of their life taking care and protecting young, so they are hardwired to be very wary.

    Bucks in rut do not care about anything. They will walk out in front of a semi truck not caring about what is around them when trailing a hot doe. And do not expect them to stop for a still shot.

    Doe meat is as good as Buck meat. And the harvesting of Doe are an essential part of keeping the herd in balance. A hunter should also be a conservationist, and keeping the buck/doe ratio is part of that job.

    Do not get caught up in the need for expensive clothing. You could hunt in a three piece suit and bright tie if you could keep still. Wash your body with scent free soap, and your clothing as well.

    When hunting from the ground, use a cover scent like fox urine to mask any remaining human odor. If you hunt from a tree stand, use raccoon urine. The best way to use this is to apply to small strips of dark cloth, and hang it in a 360 degree circle about 10 yards around your position. Use the correct scent. Deer know that fox do not climb trees!

    Watch your angles of shot! Especially from elevated positions! Learn the anatomy of the animal, and place your shots accordingly by imagining a straight line thru the animal as the path of the bullet.

    When possible, aim for the shoulder on broadside shots. This breaks the shoulder, and anchors them in place.

    If you have to track, take your time! Bright red blood is a good sign. If it is blowing to one side in sprinkles, you have a single lung hit, which may cause more effort on your part. Puddles of bright red blood and a sprayed pattern are a double lung, and will not take long for it to go down.
    Dark red blood is an indicator of a hit too far back, and will result in a long tracking job. Go back to the truck, eat a sandwich, drink some coffee, and get some material to mark your trail when you begin to track so you will know where you have been. Do not push the animal! Give it an hour or two to lay down and die, or you will increase your work. As the bleeding seems to become less obvious, mark the spot of the last sign. You may have to get down on your hands and knees and look for drops. Do not give up, patience is the key here! Hopefully you will not encounter this on your first kill.

    Be patient, have fun, and good luck! Pre season scouting will increase your chances greatly.
    Ignorance is a long way from stupid, but left unchecked, can get there real fast.

  11. #10
    Member Array cfd335's Avatar
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    thank you guys for all your advice. I want to say first off (to me) it sounded as if i was only going out to kill one and cut its head off for my wall. thats not how i am. i want to do it the right/respectful way and not "half-ass" it. yeah this to be a good time, but its more serious than trap or clay pigeon shooting. I did look, ohio does not have rifle season. only bow and muzzleloader/shotgun season. so, i get to buy another gun. aint that a shame. when and where in ohio i am going, not a clue. distant family has land to hunt on, and my dad is going to set it all up for us to go. cant wait. thanks again.

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    VIP Member Array Yoda's Avatar
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    I cannot convey 40 years of hunting wisdom easily. Suggest you spend sometime with an elder experienced hunter.


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    Quote Originally Posted by cfd335 View Post
    thank you guys for all your advice. I want to say first off (to me) it sounded as if i was only going out to kill one and cut its head off for my wall. thats not how i am. i want to do it the right/respectful way and not "half-ass" it. yeah this to be a good time, but its more serious than trap or clay pigeon shooting. I did look, ohio does not have rifle season. only bow and muzzleloader/shotgun season. so, i get to buy another gun. aint that a shame. when and where in ohio i am going, not a clue. distant family has land to hunt on, and my dad is going to set it all up for us to go. cant wait. thanks again.

    ^^^^I forgot to mention this^^^^^^^^^^^^


    You may be better served in getting an inline muzzleloader to hunt if you will be making long shots, as they are more accurate and usually have a greater distance whne using the correct sabots and powder charge(150 gr) if the firearm is able to shoot that charge safely(most newer muzzlelaoders can).
    And if OH has a separate season for muzzleloader you are already set up.
    If you want to make God laugh, tell him your plans.

    Washington didn't use his freedom of speech to defeat the British, He shot them!

    Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it whether it exists or not, diagnosing it incorrectly, and applying the wrong remedy." -- Ernest Benn

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    Senior Member Array Spidey2011's Avatar
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    A lot of good advice here. I'll just add that the caliber of your gun really isn't that important. I've taken more deer with my .22-250 and .223 than I have with my .300. Just be smart about your shots, and know your limits. Don't try to take a shot if you have ANY doubt that you can make it.

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    What part of Ohio?

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    'Hope you enjoy it.

    I'm not a super-experienced hunter, but I'm just as content to sit in the quiet of the woods, whether I see a deer or not.
    glockman10mm and tclance like this.
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