A LEO, AN L.E.O.-- A historic, indefinitely - Page 4

A LEO, AN L.E.O.-- A historic, indefinitely

This is a discussion on A LEO, AN L.E.O.-- A historic, indefinitely within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; An is used before words beginning with a vowel sound : an umbrella/an honor/.... A is used for words that start with vowels but sound ...

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  1. #46
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    An is used before words beginning with a vowel sound: an umbrella/an honor/....

    A is used for words that start with vowels but sound as consonants: a one, and a two....

    test: An hour ago I saw a hit movie!

    This is according to my Webster's Grammar, Usage and Punctuation handbook.

    * None of these rules apply if you carry a Glock


  2. #47
    VIP Member Array oakchas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pittypat21 View Post
    I can sympathize, oakchas. I've been going insane with the amount of grammar, spelling, and vocabulary problems I see on a regular basis in this forum, on Facebook, and on my school's discussion boards.

    It's ok to be a Grammar Nazi.

    When it comes to acronyms, you use the article that you would use if you spelled the acronym out. For example. With LEO, you would say, "a law enforcement officer", so you should also say, "a LEO".
    Ya know, I was thinking the same thing (my head doesn't hurt enough, yet).

    But, for me, it falls apart when dealing with an agent of the F.B.I..

    For me, an F.B.I. agent sounds correct... But, according to the spelling-it-out notion, a F.B.I. agent would be right.

    Bah! I guess everyone can just go with the voices in their own head. Write it however you want, and those of us who don't think the same way can just suffer through.
    Rats!
    It could be worse!
    I suppose

  3. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by pittypat21 View Post
    When it comes to acronyms, you use the article that you would use if you spelled the acronym out. For example. With LEO, you would say, "a law enforcement officer", so you should also say, "a LEO".
    This is not, at all, a hard and fast rule. In fact, the only place I see this is in British English, and even then it is listed as "equally correct" as using "a" or "an" based on the pronounced first letter of the abbreviation/acronym.

    A or an before an abbreviation or acronym?

    acronyms

    Do you use "an" in front of an acronym that does not begin with a vowel? - Yahoo! Answers

    articles - Do you use "a" or "an" before acronyms? - English Language and Usage

    How to Use Abbreviations
    A man fires a rifle for many years, and he goes to war. And afterward he turns the rifle in at the armory, and he believes he's finished with the rifle. But no matter what else he might do with his hands - love a woman, build a house, change his son's diaper - his hands remember the rifle.

  4. #49
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    As we used to teach in the spook business, carry a 25 if it makes you feel good, but do not ever load it. If you load it you may shoot it. If you shoot it you may hit somebody, and if you hit somebody - and he finds out about it - he may be very angry with you. -- Jeff Cooper

  5. #50
    VIP Member Array oakchas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OPFOR View Post
    This is not, at all, a hard and fast rule. In fact, the only place I see this is in British English, and even then it is listed as "equally correct" as using "a" or "an" based on the pronounced first letter of the abbreviation/acronym.

    A or an before an abbreviation or acronym?

    acronyms

    Do you use "an" in front of an acronym that does not begin with a vowel? - Yahoo! Answers

    articles - Do you use "a" or "an" before acronyms? - English Language and Usage

    How to Use Abbreviations
    Proof that I am not the only one befuddled and bemused by such indefinite rules regarding indefinite articles.

    Today's word is bandersnatch!
    Almost sounds dirty, doesn't it?
    pittypat21 likes this.
    Rats!
    It could be worse!
    I suppose

  6. #51
    VIP Member Array Eagleks's Avatar
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    Text messaging is killing the English language, so I wouldn't worry about it too much.
    I don't make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts. --- Will Rogers ---
    Chief Justice John Roberts : "I don't see how you can read Heller and not take away from it the notion that the Second Amendment...was extremely important to the framers in their view of what liberty meant."

  7. #52
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    Maybe you should just take a shot of bourbon before signing on.
    OldVet likes this.

  8. #53
    VIP Member Array oakchas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nedrgr21 View Post
    Maybe you should just take a shot of bourbon before signing on.
    Just one?
    pittypat21 likes this.
    Rats!
    It could be worse!
    I suppose

  9. #54
    Member Array FLArmadillo's Avatar
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    I wouldn't worry too much. English itself is a bastardized collection of about 5 languages. 'Tis one more way the human race moves on, it will all be OK, English will be the new Latin in 400 years.
    As we used to teach in the spook business, carry a 25 if it makes you feel good, but do not ever load it. If you load it you may shoot it. If you shoot it you may hit somebody, and if you hit somebody - and he finds out about it - he may be very angry with you. -- Jeff Cooper

  10. #55
    VIP Member Array oakchas's Avatar
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    U B right. I's B chillin'. It's all good.
    pittypat21 likes this.
    Rats!
    It could be worse!
    I suppose

  11. #56
    Distinguished Member Array Hoganbeg's Avatar
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    For a group of people not overly concerned with proper grammar, it's amazing how this topic tends to attract our posts!

  12. #57
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    The funny thing about English is that for every rule, there's an example that breaks that rule.

    Kinda like "I before E, except after C. And except for all these words..."
    "Be polite, be professional, but have a plan to kill everyone you meet."
    -General James Mattis, USMC

  13. #58
    VIP Member Array pittypat21's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oakchas View Post
    Proof that I am not the only one befuddled and bemused by such indefinite rules regarding indefinite articles.

    Today's word is bandersnatch!
    Almost sounds dirty, doesn't it?
    Sounds like a girl that's off limits.
    "Be polite, be professional, but have a plan to kill everyone you meet."
    -General James Mattis, USMC

  14. #59
    VIP Member Array Crowman's Avatar
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    Grammar/Spelling Nazi's take note......

    Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be in the rghit pclae.

    Amzanig huh? yaeh and I awlsay thoguht slpeling was ipmorantt!!!!
    msgt/ret likes this.
    "One of the greatest delusions in the world is the hope that the evils in this world are to be cured by legislation."
    --Thomas B. Reed, American Attorney

    Second Amendment -- Established December 15, 1791 and slowly eroded ever since What happened to "..... shall not be infringed."

  15. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by oakchas View Post
    Ya know, I was thinking the same thing (my head doesn't hurt enough, yet).

    But, for me, it falls apart when dealing with an agent of the F.B.I..

    For me, an F.B.I. agent sounds correct... But, according to the spelling-it-out notion, a F.B.I. agent would be right.

    Bah! I guess everyone can just go with the voices in their own head. Write it however you want, and those of us who don't think the same way can just suffer through.
    'An FBI agent' would be correct, because it's relative to the word 'agent', rather than the 'FBI' .



    Sent from my Galaxy S2
    bigmacque likes this.
    Trust in God and keep your powder dry

    "A heavily armed citizenry is not about overthrowing the government; it is about preventing the government from overthrowing liberty. A people stripped of their right of self defense is defenseless against their own government." -source

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