James Bond's PPK was "junk"

This is a discussion on James Bond's PPK was "junk" within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Originally Posted by archer51 I believe it was the Beretta 418, in .25. Then went to the Walther PPK .32ACP. I believe you are right. ...

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Thread: James Bond's PPK was "junk"

  1. #31
    StarPD45
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    Quote Originally Posted by archer51 View Post
    I believe it was the Beretta 418, in .25. Then went to the Walther PPK .32ACP.
    I believe you are right. As I recall from reading the books some time ago, he also had a "silencer" on the Beretta at times.

    As to the PPK: I had a PPKS Stainless in .380. Nice looking gun. Accurate as anything WHEN IT WORKED. Mine was a jammamatic. If you were lucky, it would get off two rounds. No way I would carry it. I later sold it to a dealer.

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  3. #32
    OD*
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    Cory1022 and elmacgyver0 like this.
    "The pistol, learn it well, carry it always ..." ~ Jeff Cooper

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  4. #33
    Member Array hfjeff's Avatar
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    I would still take one in a heart beat. I seriously considered it for my first CC if only it were a 9mm.

  5. #34
    Member Array Sledge's Avatar
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    I'll always like the PPK no matter who says what about it. It's still on my to get list.

  6. #35
    Senior Member Array wjh2657's Avatar
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    I had an Interarms PPK for quite awhile (20 years+) but I never used it as a carry gun. Super elegant and easily concealed, mine had two flaws that precluded carry for me: It was prone to jamming ( very picky as to ammo) and the slide was a real task to cycle manually ( neccessary for malfunction drills). I preferred the BERSA for carry in .380, it was not as pretty but a whole lot more practical. In my old age I have gone to J-Frames for carry.
    Retired Marine, Retired School Teacher, Independent voter, Goldwater Conservative.

  7. #36
    VIP Member Array Thunder71's Avatar
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    What do you expect, it was in the STYLE section.

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  8. #37
    Member Array lilmule's Avatar
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    The beretta jammed as to why it was replaced,and with a 32 acp not a 380.
    Most euro guns like euro ammo,and often the copies thereof are or seem better as made elsewhere.
    Any good gun model has been copied or parts thereof,and the pp,ppk.ppk/s were the original pocket guns to emulate.
    The pocket gun of yesteryear often in 32 acp then 380 and took a large pocket in some guns,yet a secondary caliber firearm in most euro countries in or during ww2 and almost a primary in ww1.Most likly more 32 acp ruby pistols in the trenches than anything.

  9. #38
    Member Array bigredfish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by QKShooter View Post
    The DA pull can be lightened up if desired. The SA pull is usually quite crisp & sweet.
    Very good accuracy due to fixed barrel.
    Fairly heavy for the magazine capacity & caliber.
    Break the sharp edges on the slide...that is a quick 15 Minute "fix" of the bite issue.
    Some folks without good hand strength have a difficult time operating the slide.
    You can safely move to a lighter recoil spring weight without beating up the gun.
    ^^^^^
    This

    Please don't let me 20 year old Interarms PPK/S read that story, as it's been reliable and accurate for over 1500 rounds and is still carried when I can't conceal something bigger.
    I trust it enough to carry it and shoot it regularly with Gold Dots as well as FMJ.
    I do get slide bite now and then, it happens.
    Like many small pistols, it often comes down to the shooter knowing how to hold and manage the gun.

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  10. #39
    Member Array violinjim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pogo2 View Post
    I've owned a .380 Walther PPK for about 14 years and have put maybe 1000 rounds through it. Once in awhile I have carried it. I don't really agree with this writer's criticism of the gun. My evaluation is:

    1. Trigger pull - the first DA pull is a little heavier than I like, but the subsequent SA pull is very good.
    2. Accuracy - the gun is surprisingly accurate, and has small but useful sights.
    3. Recoil - the recoil is not bad at all, and certainly less than lighter weight .380 guns.
    4. Sharp slide edge - I have never received a slide cut while shooting the gun. I think this depends on the configuration of your hand and how you hold the gun.
    5. Concealability - first rate, the gun is small and slim, and conceals very easily.
    6. Looks - a very attractive gun.
    7. Quality of construction - very well made, typical of Walther.
    I'm with you on your points. This is my preferred shoulder carry under my tux when playing violin. Anything else is prohibitive to playing the instrument. And the gun is dead sexy. .380 isn't the best round for SD but with good shot placement, should do the trick.
    I've had mine for @ 6 years.
    Jim

  11. #40
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    I have a PPK/S. The slide is heavy. The trigger is heavy. It could use a few more rounded edges. And it does jump quite a bit for a .380. But none of those things I consider a complaint. Its a great little gun. Made well, shoots great, and accuracy is mostly in the hand of the shooter. I'd recommend one for the collection.
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  12. #41
    Member Array Archie's Avatar
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    The PPK, Stephen Hunter and Ian Fleming

    The author, Stephen Hunter, is billed as a writer of action stories and somewhat knowledgeable about firearms. I'm sure he makes money on his writing and I'm sure he has shot some guns. He probably owns guns. However, he has a serious lack of knowledge about self-defense guns.

    For being 'obsolete' in 1953 or so, according to Mr. Hunter, the pistol is still in production. Neither .32 ACP or .380 ACP are considered 'man-stopper' loads, but both are very controllable and provide adequate penetration at close range. Close range is where 'defense' happens. The PP and PPK or PPK/s is a very handy pocket pistol - even if carried as a belt gun by various European police agencies and the German Army of the Second World War.

    I currently have a PPK/s in .380 ACP. It shoots accurately enough for defense work. If I'm not careful griping the pistol, I can get slide bite. The rest of that story is I have fleshy hands and get 'bit' by lots of pistols.

    The double action pull is similar to a 75 pound rake drug through gravel? My findings are a bit different. It isn't like a good S&W K frame, but it isn't nearly impossible. The single action has a bit of creep, but adequate for defense work.

    One wonders in reading the essay about the background of the comments. Has the author actually fired such a pistol? How many? (I have one and have fired two or three others. They were all about the same - none of them remarkable enough to remember, either good or bad.) What is the point of the article? He doesn't seem to be promoting anything, so is he just stirring the pot? From this, I won't consider much more of his work.

    Ian Fleming was a trained shooter from his Navy service. However, he wasn't overly familiar with commercial firearms of the world. Which explains why he needed to have his spelling of Beretta corrected and not knowing about details. For instance, a Colt Police Positive with a sawn barrel is available directly from Colt (or at least was at the time) as a Detective Special. Of course, a Detective Special has a front sight mounted.

    Nor did Mr. Fleming understand 'home modifications': Simply sawing off a barrel gives rather questionable results. For uniform results, the barrel end must be crowned. This can be done with a flat file, but it takes some work. Threading a barrel for a suppressor requires a bit more than home workshops typically provide. It is possible to do, but counter boring requires a drill press or milling machine with appropriate vices to hold the barrel while boring or cutting the threads. An outside thread is simpler, but depends on how the suppressor is made. Nor does a Beretta 418 have enough barrel extending from the slide to thread for a muffler. Filing a point on the firing pin was considered a way to encourage proper ignition of the primer. However, it tends to pierce the primers and actually doesn't give any better ignition.

    And that soft chamois skin 'bag' holster hanging under his arm? Hideous.

    Still, I really like the original James Bond stories. I'm going to have to dig them up and read them again. The original Bond was much more adaptable and competent than the character in the later movies who seemed to be dependent on gimmicks.
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  13. #42
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    This article is factually incorrect.

    It's true that Flemming didn't know much about guns in the beginning. He had Bond using a Beretta 418 in .25 ACP (M1934 in the movie) until writing Dr. No, when he was contacted by a gun collector and fan of his books, who would eventually become the namesake for Major Boothroyd aka Q.
    Geoffrey Boothroyd told him that the .25 ACP was a "ladies round" and to switch to a S&W Centennial Airweight in .38 Special. They eventually settled on the Walther PPK in 7.65 (.32 ACP).

    He's just trying to make it publicly sound like he knows a lot about guns as well as ride the SkyFall wave, in order to sell his new book.
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  14. #43
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    Strange, I shoot .32 ACP pistols (one is a Yugoslavian CZ70 "Tokarev" type pistol that was a European police "turn-in." The little pistol is a pip and shoots like a house afire with both the European and BB loads. (The BB cast 73-grain flat-nosed loads generate plenty of energy and penetration.) There is certainly enough "pop" to make the "little" .32 penetrate either the skull or sternum.

    Don't buy into the premise of "the .32 ACP doesn't have sufficient power to kill a man when called upon to do so." I happen to know if you use Fiocchi or Buffalo Bore ammunition (FMJ or Hard Cast Lead) the .32 ACP will kill a man, and rather quickly! If you dump the entire magazine into his chest or face, I can quite assure you, a man will die straight away.

    Scott
    Last edited by OD*; April 6th, 2013 at 08:56 AM. Reason: Inappropriate Language

  15. #44
    Member Array Cheef's Avatar
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    Love/Hate relationship with mine.
    KEEP IT CLEAN and it is a joy to shoot. (It likes being clean so much it kind of starts acting up after 30 or 40 rounds)
    Neglect the maintenance and pot luck.

  16. #45
    Distinguished Member Array grouse's Avatar
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    Love the line in Dr. No when Bonds .25 Beretta is replaced by the .32 cal. PPk "the american C.I.A swear by them. delivery like a brick through a plate glass window."
    When I questioned my brothers choice of a .380 for his main carry gun his responce was "I think Mr. Bond would disagree."

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