Food & Drink: Post your recipes what you're drinking and where your eating.

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  1. #16
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    Beer cabbage--

    In a pan, cook chopped cabbage and onions in beer, perferably a dark ale such as Guiness. When done, drain and mix in bits of crispy bacon. Then eat--what are you waiting for?

    My wife doesn't like beer, but she'll slap my hand if I reach for seconds. She claims chef squatter's rights.
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    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ericb327 View Post
    I will start the thread with one of my favorite recipes.

    Vegetable Beef Soup


    Eric, I've made up a batch of this and it's "resting" to blend the flavors right now. It made about 7qts of stock, and one-third of the stock with veggies/meat has made about ~8qts of soup. The other two-thirds of the stock is in the freezer for next time. Total will be ~24qts of soup from the recipe, more or less. (You weren't kidding when you warned that it makes "a lot of soup.")

    I'll let you know how it turns out. Smells wonderful already, and I can't wait until it's ready. A fresh, heavy, crusty dark bread is waiting in the wings. Mmmmm.

    Thanks for the recipe!


    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    Beer cabbage--

    In a pan, cook chopped cabbage and onions in beer, perferably a dark ale such as Guiness. When done, drain and mix in bits of crispy bacon.
    At a restaurant recently, I had a small serving of "beer green beans," similarly made with beer and bacon. Amazingly tasty. Was on the menu as normal green beans, but apparently it's one of their special little concoctions.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccw9mm View Post


    Eric, I've made up a batch of this and it's "resting" to blend the flavors right now. It made about 7qts of stock, and one-third of the stock with veggies/meat has made about ~8qts of soup. The other two-thirds of the stock is in the freezer for next time. Total will be ~24qts of soup from the recipe, more or less. (You weren't kidding when you warned that it makes "a lot of soup.")

    I'll let you know how it turns out. Smells wonderful already, and I can't wait until it's ready. A fresh, heavy, crusty dark bread is waiting in the wings. Mmmmm.

    Thanks for the recipe!
    I can't tell you how good it makes me feel to see people trying my recipes. It makes me even more nervous to see how you like it. Tasting through the entire process is essential to get the flavors right. It really is difficult putting recipes like this to paper. I hope you like it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ericb327 View Post
    I can't tell you how good it makes me feel to see people trying my recipes. It makes me even more nervous to see how you like it. Tasting through the entire process is essential to get the flavors right. It really is difficult putting recipes like this to paper. I hope you like it.
    Yeah, spicing to taste is extremely subjective. It's early in the process, right now, with the soup "resting" to blend the flavors. So, I've taken a shot at spicing it up a bit during the cooking process. I prefer a bit more kick than I had been tasting during cooking, so added some a few peppers and additional fresh ground pepper to the stock, quite a bit more fresh ground pepper to the soup, as well as a harissa-infused extra virgin olive oil to the soup. I've done similarly with a few other soups from scratch, and they've each turned out really tasty. Hopefully, this one will be the same. Taste-testing a spoonful or two so far shows it has real promise. Rich, thick (and thickening), with wonderfully complex flavors. Amazing, what a stock from scratch does to a recipe.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccw9mm View Post
    Yeah, spicing to taste is extremely subjective. It's early in the process, right now, with the soup "resting" to blend the flavors. So, I've taken a shot at spicing it up a bit during the cooking process. I prefer a bit more kick than I had been tasting during cooking, so added some a few peppers and additional fresh ground pepper to the stock, quite a bit more fresh ground pepper to the soup, as well as a harissa-infused extra virgin olive oil to the soup. I've done similarly with a few other soups from scratch, and they've each turned out really tasty. Hopefully, this one will be the same. Taste-testing a spoonful or two so far shows it has real promise. Rich, thick (and thickening), with wonderfully complex flavors. Amazing, what a stock from scratch does to a recipe.
    Yup, recipes are just a road map. There are many ways to get there. Glad you playing with it and making it your own, the sign of a good cook!
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    double post
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    Some of the best BBQ recipes I use comes from these guys
    BBQ Ribs Recipe Pit Boys Country Style - YouTube
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  9. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccw9mm View Post
    Yeah, spicing to taste is extremely subjective. It's early in the process, right now, with the soup "resting" to blend the flavors. So, I've taken a shot at spicing it up a bit during the cooking process. I prefer a bit more kick than I had been tasting during cooking, so added some a few peppers and additional fresh ground pepper to the stock, quite a bit more fresh ground pepper to the soup, as well as a harissa-infused extra virgin olive oil to the soup. I've done similarly with a few other soups from scratch, and they've each turned out really tasty. Hopefully, this one will be the same. Taste-testing a spoonful or two so far shows it has real promise. Rich, thick (and thickening), with wonderfully complex flavors. Amazing, what a stock from scratch does to a recipe.
    I'm expecting pics and your final thoughts.
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    Re: Food & Drink: Post your recipes what you're drinking and where your eating.

    Is it dinner time yet, all this talk of food

  11. #25
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    Roast Duck With Chinese Five Spice & Hoisin Sauce!

    IMAG0295.jpg

    IMAG0297.jpg

    IMAG0301.jpg
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zsnake View Post
    OK, I'm gonna share me Sainted Mudder's sloppy joe recipe...it's the only thing I make well.

    Brown x number of pounds of 97% lean hamberger (or eqivalent). One Pound makes six to eight samitches.

    Mix in a crock-pot the burger, one can of Campbell's Chicken Gumbo Soup for each pound of hamburger you cooked. (Better with the original, but the healthy/low sodium crap will work)

    Add three tablespoons of Chilli Powder, 1 tsp salt and 1 tbls pepper, a splotch of ketchup, a dabble of mustard, and chopped onion for each pound you are making.

    Stir occasionally sampling and adjusting ingrediants to your taste as you go.

    Slow cook all day.

    It's actually better the second day or longer if you freeze the leftovers (Fat chance around here) and re-heat.

    ENJOY!
    I'm making this tomorrow!
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    Blackened Salmon

    Ok, I do this quite often here, and it just so happens I did it this evening. This is more of a process than a recipe.

    Get some good quality salmon filets, just like steaks you get what you pay for. Take a plate and pour in a splash of grapeseed oil or olive oil. Set the salmon in the oil then flip it over so both sides get oiled. Sprinkle one side with some sort of blackening seasoning. It's not a big deal what type you use, in fact tonight I just used a dry "Hog Rub" made for pork. It really doesn't matter, but you need one side of that salmon with a thick coat so it forms a crust against the heat. Pour it on pretty thick, at least to the point where you can't really see but a heavy sprinkle of seasoning on that one fish side. Use a cast iron frying pan and pour a good splash of grapeseed oil or olive oil in it. Put the pan on the stove burner, wait until it gets around 500 degrees.

    Lay the salmon pieces in the pan with the seasoned side down. Cook that side for about 2 minutes, then turn it over and cook the over side for a bit less, maybe a minute to a minute and a half for the unseasoned side. The smoke alarm sometimes goes off at this point. Also, don't freak out, but you'll see the seasoned side will look black and burned when you turned it over, don't worry about that either, it'll taste fine. Now put the cast iron pan with the salmon directly into a pre heated oven at about 400 degrees for 20 minutes. If you like your salmon "rarer" you'll have to adjust your cooking times less.

    We usually serve it with freshly cooked spinach, some other saute'd vegetables, maybe garlic mashed potatoes and of course, french bread.

    Be careful when you initially lay the salmon in that hot pan, you might get popped with a little hot oil, and be careful when you transfer it to the oven, the handle on that cast iron pan will be plenty hot.

    Dill goes well with salmon. You can mix some freshly crushed dill with sour cream to put on your blackened salmon.

    The attached photo shows the two blackened sides and the unblackened side of one.
    Attached Images
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  14. #28
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    To Eric, regarding the veg-beef soup recipe

    Eric:

    I've got a question regarding your recipe for vegetable beef soup.

    Q: How much liquid beyond the soup stock (homemade from marrow bones) do you typically find yourself adding? How much have you been able to get away with adding, without diluting the flavors?


    This time around, I have used an 8qt stock pot (for the third portion of the stock/fixin's that I used in this batch of the full recipe). So, all the quantities and volumes are thirded from the recipe's original values.

    I saw the recipe's suggestion to add enough water "to cover" the vegetables that had been added. Trouble is, when it cooks down a bit, the resulting "rested" soup is extremely dense, without a lot of liquid.

    I'm all for hearty, filling soups. And this one has it in spades. But I'm a sucker for lots of mouth-watering broth, too.

    BTW, I just had a "breakfast" bowl of the soup, along with a good-sized hunk of hot crusty bread (a Pugliese-style levain, wonderfully heavy, chewy and crusty). Mmmmm, good. The flavors are still blending a bit, I'm supposing, but already it's a spicy, biting, but complex set of flavors that sends the mouth a-jingling. And I got the cooking time for the veggies just right, I think. Still, after ~20hrs of resting, the veggies are still al dente. Perfect.

    As for spicing, herbs and other minor changes, here is basically what I've done (this time around, my first and only time with this recipe).


    For the Stock:
    1. Cooked a full batch of the stock, per the recipe. Used one-third of it for this batch of the soup, freezing the rest.

    2. Used buffalo shank/shin marrow bones. Extremely flavorful, though a tad more expensive than standard beef soup bones. For ~24qts of soup, I'd say it's a worthwhile change.

    3. Added ~50%+ to the herbs, overall; quite a bit more spices.

    4. Added 1 sage leaf, 1 sprig of rosemary, and a couple extra sprigs of thyme.

    5. Nearly doubled the number of garlic cloves, coarsely chopped.

    6. Added ~3-4 tbsp fresh ground pepper.

    7. Added another whole onion to the stock.



    For the Soup:
    1. With the meat (chuck roast, trimmed), I used about the amount suggested. In this thirded portion of the batch, that resulted in about ~3 handsful of cubed meat, about a cup and a half of finished browned meat cubes. A bit light for ~7-8qts of finished soup, IMO. Could easily handle another ~50%, depending on the person. As it is, the resulting soup has a bit of meat, but not too much. Good starting point, as is. Just about right, for most folks I'd say.

    2. Added a few more garlic cloves to the soup, finely minced.

    3. Added 2 sage leaves, 2 sprigs of rosemary and a few extra sprigs of thyme.

    4. Boosted tomatoes by 20%.

    5. Did not use any soup base or bouillon cubes. Instead, used a bit more than 1/8 cup of a lower-sodium creole seasoning, ~4-5 tbsp fresh ground pepper (to start). No salt, as the stock and added creole seasoning seem to have plenty.

    6. Added another pack of Sazon Goya to the soup, beyond the recipe. In this go, I could only find the Sazon Goya with coriander and annatto. An interesting mix of flavors. Can't say whether the "original" variant would be better. This one (the coriander/annatto) has resulted in a pretty great taste.

    7. Added 5 mini peppers (red, yellow, orange), coarsely chopped. Added a medium-sized Serrano pepper, coarsely chopped.

    8. Added ~30% to the amount of green beans used in the soup.

    9. Guessed on the amount of water sufficient "to cover." IMO, the resulting ratio of broth-to-other is a bit light on the broth. But then, I'm a sucker for mouth-watering broth. Added ~1.5qts or so, additional water, which was sufficient "to cover."

    10. About half-way through the cook-time for the soup (~20mins or so), I added a bit less than 1/4 cup of harissa-infused extra virgin olive oil. I've found this type of EVOO adds a nice kick and smoothness to the food. Thought I'd try it in this soup.



    Amount of Water:

    If I were to guess on the needed amount of additional water to cover, I would say ~4-5qts might be good, beyond the (thirded) ~6qts that the basic stock/veggie/beef mix ends up with. My big concern would be, of course, the risk of diluting the stock's richness. Uncertain whether it would dilute the flavor.

    This time I had added ~1.5qts or so, just sufficient to cover things prior to it cooking down a bit. As the tomatoes and veggies softened, it was clear that a few more quarts could be added to maintain broth volume.

    With the added water, I'll double or triple it next time, at minimum, to see how it goes. Though, I don't have a 12-16qt soup pot. That'll be needed in order to add that much additional liquid and still have room for the soup to nicely boil/simmer away. Can't easily be taking ~4qts stock a ~4qts veggies then add ~4qts water. As it is with the thirded recipe batch, I had a bit of overflow from the 8qt pot when the simmering got too vigorous. Ah, well.

    Final note (on the amount of liquid and resulting volume of soup): Can't imagine how big a pot would be needed to make the entire batch all at once. As it is, I used a 8qt pot (but needed a 12qt one). A full batch would be roughly triple this (24qt minimum, if not ~36qt).


    Spicing to Taste:

    My rationale for boosting the spicing, to taste: gauging the way the tougher veggies were showing uptake of the spicing and stock flavors. The corn and carrots are normally gauges I take, during production.

    In this case, they didn't seem to be flavoring up the way I had expected. Might well have, if I had cooked them through. But in past, I've found that a flavorful and spicier dish shows itself in the tougher veggies decently well, through the cooking time of the soup. This one didn't appear to be taking up the flavors strongly enough. The carrots were still "blah" after 20mins of soup cooking time. And so, as it went I spiced to taste, ending up with the measurements of creole/pepper seasonings that I mentioned above.

    Likely too spicy for some folks, but this batch is going to be my "tester."
    Better to do it in private, to avoid any teary sessions with test-subjects.


    Rest Time:

    I don't know if the ~20hrs of resting time is sufficient, yet. Over the next few days, I'll have a few more bowls of the soup and I'll let you know if that changes. But, so far, it's excellent. Extremely rich and complex flavors, tasty veggies chock full of the stock, herb and spice flavors, just enough meat to make it savory.


    For Serving:
    1. Using a 1-cup measuring cup, dunk a cup full of the fixin's (veggies/meat) into a serving bowl. Then get a cup full (or two) of the broth and pour over the fixin's. (Gotta have a decent-sized bowl for this much.) One cup of fixin's is plenty. With a chunk of bread, it's a full meal.

    2. Drizzled a little harissa-infused extra virgin olive oil, over the serving.

    3. Fresh-baked crusty bread, a Pugliese-style levain.

    4. Reheated a single bowl full in the microwave (this time). On the stove, next few times.

    5. Allowed the bread to sop up the juices. Let sit for ~2mins before tasting. Heaven.




    Overall, I think the recipe's a winner. I realize I've made significant changes to the spicing and herbs, to taste. But I like spicier dishes. These changes have added quite a bit of "bite" to the flavor, but the additional herbs, mild peppers and added water has, I think, moderated the kick to result in a reasonably complex, spicier blend.


    Thank you for the recipe, Eric! It's a good one. Pass on my thanks to your mother, for her love and care in creating this. My hat's off to her.

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  15. #29
    Distinguished Member Array ericb327's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccw9mm View Post
    Eric:

    I've got a question regarding your recipe for vegetable beef soup.

    Q: How much liquid beyond the soup stock (homemade from marrow bones) do you typically find yourself adding? How much have you been able to get away with adding, without diluting the flavors?


    This time around, I have used an 8qt stock pot (for the third portion of the stock/fixin's that I used in this batch of the full recipe). So, all the quantities and volumes are thirded from the recipe's original values.

    I saw the recipe's suggestion to add enough water "to cover" the vegetables that had been added. Trouble is, when it cooks down a bit, the resulting "rested" soup is extremely dense, without a lot of liquid.

    I'm all for hearty, filling soups. And this one has it in spades. But I'm a sucker for lots of mouth-watering broth, too.

    BTW, I just had a "breakfast" bowl of the soup, along with a good-sized hunk of hot crusty bread (a Pugliese-style levain, wonderfully heavy, chewy and crusty). Mmmmm, good. The flavors are still blending a bit, I'm supposing, but already it's a spicy, biting, but complex set of flavors that sends the mouth a-jingling. And I got the cooking time for the veggies just right, I think. Still, after ~20hrs of resting, the veggies are still al dente. Perfect.

    As for spicing, herbs and other minor changes, here is basically what I've done (this time around, my first and only time with this recipe).


    For the Stock:
    1. Cooked a full batch of the stock, per the recipe. Used one-third of it for this batch of the soup, freezing the rest.

    2. Used buffalo shank/shin marrow bones. Extremely flavorful, though a tad more expensive than standard beef soup bones. For ~24qts of soup, I'd say it's a worthwhile change.

    3. Added ~50%+ to the herbs, overall; quite a bit more spices.

    4. Added 1 sage leaf, 1 sprig of rosemary, and a couple extra sprigs of thyme.

    5. Nearly doubled the number of garlic cloves, coarsely chopped.

    6. Added ~3-4 tbsp fresh ground pepper.

    7. Added another whole onion to the stock.



    For the Soup:
    1. With the meat (chuck roast, trimmed), I used about the amount suggested. In this thirded portion of the batch, that resulted in about ~3 handsful of cubed meat, about a cup and a half of finished browned meat cubes. A bit light for ~7-8qts of finished soup, IMO. Could easily handle another ~50%, depending on the person. As it is, the resulting soup has a bit of meat, but not too much. Good starting point, as is. Just about right, for most folks I'd say.

    2. Added a few more garlic cloves to the soup, finely minced.

    3. Added 2 sage leaves, 2 sprigs of rosemary and a few extra sprigs of thyme.

    4. Boosted tomatoes by 20%.

    5. Did not use any soup base or bouillon cubes. Instead, used a bit more than 1/8 cup of a lower-sodium creole seasoning, ~4-5 tbsp fresh ground pepper (to start). No salt, as the stock and added creole seasoning seem to have plenty.

    6. Added another pack of Sazon Goya to the soup, beyond the recipe. In this go, I could only find the Sazon Goya with coriander and annatto. An interesting mix of flavors. Can't say whether the "original" variant would be better. This one (the coriander/annatto) has resulted in a pretty great taste.

    7. Added 5 mini peppers (red, yellow, orange), coarsely chopped. Added a medium-sized Serrano pepper, coarsely chopped.

    8. Added ~30% to the amount of green beans used in the soup.

    9. Guessed on the amount of water sufficient "to cover." IMO, the resulting ratio of broth-to-other is a bit light on the broth. But then, I'm a sucker for mouth-watering broth. Added ~1.5qts or so, additional water, which was sufficient "to cover."

    10. About half-way through the cook-time for the soup (~20mins or so), I added a bit less than 1/4 cup of harissa-infused extra virgin olive oil. I've found this type of EVOO adds a nice kick and smoothness to the food. Thought I'd try it in this soup.



    Amount of Water:

    If I were to guess on the needed amount of additional water to cover, I would say ~4-5qts might be good, beyond the (thirded) ~6qts that the basic stock/veggie/beef mix ends up with. My big concern would be, of course, the risk of diluting the stock's richness. Uncertain whether it would dilute the flavor.

    This time I had added ~1.5qts or so, just sufficient to cover things prior to it cooking down a bit. As the tomatoes and veggies softened, it was clear that a few more quarts could be added to maintain broth volume.

    With the added water, I'll double or triple it next time, at minimum, to see how it goes. Though, I don't have a 12-16qt soup pot. That'll be needed in order to add that much additional liquid and still have room for the soup to nicely boil/simmer away. Can't easily be taking ~4qts stock a ~4qts veggies then add ~4qts water. As it is with the thirded recipe batch, I had a bit of overflow from the 8qt pot when the simmering got too vigorous. Ah, well.

    Final note (on the amount of liquid and resulting volume of soup): Can't imagine how big a pot would be needed to make the entire batch all at once. As it is, I used a 8qt pot (but needed a 12qt one). A full batch would be roughly triple this (24qt minimum, if not ~36qt).


    Spicing to Taste:

    My rationale for boosting the spicing, to taste: gauging the way the tougher veggies were showing uptake of the spicing and stock flavors. The corn and carrots are normally gauges I take, during production.

    In this case, they didn't seem to be flavoring up the way I had expected. Might well have, if I had cooked them through. But in past, I've found that a flavorful and spicier dish shows itself in the tougher veggies decently well, through the cooking time of the soup. This one didn't appear to be taking up the flavors strongly enough. The carrots were still "blah" after 20mins of soup cooking time. And so, as it went I spiced to taste, ending up with the measurements of creole/pepper seasonings that I mentioned above.

    Likely too spicy for some folks, but this batch is going to be my "tester."
    Better to do it in private, to avoid any teary sessions with test-subjects.


    Rest Time:

    I don't know if the ~20hrs of resting time is sufficient, yet. Over the next few days, I'll have a few more bowls of the soup and I'll let you know if that changes. But, so far, it's excellent. Extremely rich and complex flavors, tasty veggies chock full of the stock, herb and spice flavors, just enough meat to make it savory.


    For Serving:
    1. Using a 1-cup measuring cup, dunk a cup full of the fixin's (veggies/meat) into a serving bowl. Then get a cup full (or two) of the broth and pour over the fixin's. (Gotta have a decent-sized bowl for this much.) One cup of fixin's is plenty. With a chunk of bread, it's a full meal.

    2. Drizzled a little harissa-infused extra virgin olive oil, over the serving.

    3. Fresh-baked crusty bread, a Pugliese-style levain.

    4. Reheated a single bowl full in the microwave (this time). On the stove, next few times.

    5. Allowed the bread to sop up the juices. Let sit for ~2mins before tasting. Heaven.




    Overall, I think the recipe's a winner. I realize I've made significant changes to the spicing and herbs, to taste. But I like spicier dishes. These changes have added quite a bit of "bite" to the flavor, but the additional herbs, mild peppers and added water has, I think, moderated the kick to result in a reasonably complex, spicier blend.


    Thank you for the recipe, Eric! It's a good one. Pass on my thanks to your mother, for her love and care in creating this. My hat's off to her.

    To the water question. The amount differs from batch to batch. The beef base usually compensates for dilution very well. It's the stock that really makes the soup rich. If you like this recipe. try the chicken soup recipe with jalapenos. I like that you added sage, rosemary and peppers. I grow them but don't put them in the soup. You did exactly what I expected when you added things to your taste. I don't expect people to follow my recipe like it's the gospel. I find myself making this different every time. All the tweeks you made are very normal for each batch. I'm glad it worked for you.
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  16. #30
    Member Array IronMike's Avatar
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    Mar 2009
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    Brown 20 lbs ground beef (the cheaper the better)
    Add 5 lbs flour,stir to coat meat
    ! lb salt
    1 lb black pepper
    1 cup crushed red pepper
    20 gallons milk stirred in to make gravy
    Serve over toast
    Have the Bugler sound "Chow"
    ericb327, ppkheat and Echo_Four like this.
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