Food & Drink: Post your recipes what you're drinking and where your eating.

This is a discussion on Food & Drink: Post your recipes what you're drinking and where your eating. within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; New Recipe on my blog Roast Duck with Chinese Five Spice and Hoisin Sauce. Turned out great!...

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  1. #31
    Distinguished Member Array ericb327's Avatar
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    New Recipe on my blog

    Roast Duck with Chinese Five Spice and Hoisin Sauce.

    Turned out great!
    For to win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the acme of skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the acme of skill. (Sun Tzu) The Art of War

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  3. #32
    Distinguished Member Array tcox4freedom's Avatar
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    2 part H; 1 part O then add a slice of lemon is the recipe for my favorite drink. A little heat & a little smoke plus most any (beef, pork, fowl or fish) meat covers what I like to eat.

  4. #33
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tcox4freedom View Post
    A little heat & a little smoke plus most any (beef, pork, fowl or fish) meat covers what I like to eat.
    That was you, last weekend?!

    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
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  5. #34
    Distinguished Member Array ericb327's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zsnake View Post
    OK, I'm gonna share me Sainted Mudder's sloppy joe recipe...it's the only thing I make well.

    Brown x number of pounds of 97% lean hamberger (or eqivalent). One Pound makes six to eight samitches.

    Mix in a crock-pot the burger, one can of Campbell's Chicken Gumbo Soup for each pound of hamburger you cooked. (Better with the original, but the healthy/low sodium crap will work)

    Add three tablespoons of Chilli Powder, 1 tsp salt and 1 tbls pepper, a splotch of ketchup, a dabble of mustard, and chopped onion for each pound you are making.

    Stir occasionally sampling and adjusting ingrediants to your taste as you go.

    Slow cook all day.

    It's actually better the second day or longer if you freeze the leftovers (Fat chance around here) and re-heat.

    ENJOY!
    Just ate my first sandwich, Awesome! Added some smoked paprika. Great recipe!
    For to win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the acme of skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the acme of skill. (Sun Tzu) The Art of War

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  6. #35
    VIP Member Array Spirit51's Avatar
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    Here is one that I have the bartender make me at American Legion Parties.

    Kansas City Ice Water

    1 oz. of gin

    1 oz. of vodka

    1/2 oz. of lime juice

    1/2 oz. of Triple Sec.

    3 oz. of 7up

    Combine gin, vodka, lime juice, and triple sec in shaker with ice. Shake and strain into chilled pint glass with ice. Pour 7up and add lime wedge. Serve. Enjoy.
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  7. #36
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    RE the veg-beef soup that ericb327 posted ...

    It's excellent!, and keeps getting better with age. A portion of the soup has been "resting" in the fridge, blending the flavors over the past two days. The flavors are spicier, more complex and satisfying with each serving. Highly recommended. As is the stock from scratch, which makes a big difference in overall depth of flavor.

    Suggestion: make the stock on one day, the soup on the next, then let it age/rest in the fridge for ~2 days to blend the flavors. Freeze the portion not going to be consumed within the next couple of days, then serve the rest.
    ericb327 and tcox4freedom like this.
    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
    Thoughts: Justifiable self defense (A.O.J.).
    Explain: How does disarming victims reduce the number of victims?
    Reason over Force: The Gun is Civilization (Marko Kloos).
    NRA, GOA, OFF, ACLDN.

  8. #37
    Distinguished Member Array ericb327's Avatar
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    Habanero & Trinidad Scorpion Hot Sauce

    Made this today with my remaining harvest of Trinidad Scorpion Chilies.
    For to win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the acme of skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the acme of skill. (Sun Tzu) The Art of War

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  9. #38
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ericb327 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Comment from your BLOG
    It’s awesome and quite simple. I made it; now I have to figure out how to eat it!
    Truer words were never spoken.

    What, no Jolokia? Only the Scorpions? I wonder if there's some "perfect" combination that represents the best flavors of them all. Hm. Wouldn't that be a peachy job, Pepper-Combinations Taste tester Extraordinaire?
    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
    Thoughts: Justifiable self defense (A.O.J.).
    Explain: How does disarming victims reduce the number of victims?
    Reason over Force: The Gun is Civilization (Marko Kloos).
    NRA, GOA, OFF, ACLDN.

  10. #39
    Member Array MoMike's Avatar
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    Lately, my area has seen a lot of small wineries appear ( Do a search for "Route Du Vin" ). Now that the weather is much cooler, a fire in the fireplace, and the wife and I enjoy a bottle of local wine on a cold evening.
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  11. #40
    Distinguished Member Array ericb327's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccw9mm View Post
    Truer words were never spoken.

    What, no Jolokia? Only the Scorpions? I wonder if there's some "perfect" combination that represents the best flavors of them all. Hm. Wouldn't that be a peachy job, Pepper-Combinations Taste tester Extraordinaire?
    I gave away all the Ghost Chilies. I find them all very similar in flavor; it's the heat level that makes the difference.
    For to win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the acme of skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the acme of skill. (Sun Tzu) The Art of War

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  12. #41
    Member Array l1a1's Avatar
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    Made Shephards Pie with Venison tonight.

    2 pounds ground venison
    1 large onion chopped
    about 4 or 5 cups prepared mashed taters. I cheated and used instant as that was all I had.
    Assorted canned veggies. I used a can of corn, and one can of peas/carrots (mixed).
    1 cup brown gravy. Also cheated and used one of the premade gravy packets.

    Preheat oven to 400F.

    Brown the deer and season to taste, add the chopped onion and saute until the onion is your desired level of doneness.
    I would say drain the ground deer but it's so lean it probably won't be necessary. Add garlic to taste. About 3 or 4 tbls of the minced stuff worked for me.

    While the meat is browning prepare the mashed taters, gravy and veggies. I seasoned the veggies with salt, pepper, a tbs of butter and got cooked them a bit while the meat was browing.

    Spread the meat mixture into a 13x9 pan. Layer the veggies over the meat mixture. Pour the gravy over the entire thing. Layer the taters over the top of the meat mixture and pop
    into the oven for 15 or 20 minutes. To brown the taters you can place the oven on broil the last couple of minutes and watch until you have the desired results.
    It's kind of like how some people have a sudden and insatiable desire to talk about vampires after the Twilight series became popular, except zombies are much less gay and more likely to exist one day

  13. #42
    Ex Member Array F350's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    Here's my favorite recipe: Bourbon with a splash of Coke in a tall glass. Good for all occasions.
    I sure hope you're not using GOOD bourbon for that

    Here is my favorite bourbon drink recipe; take a bottle of quality bourbon, pour 2 oz in a Glencarin crystal nosing glass, light 1 Cuban Cohiba cigar...ENJOY!



    OK now for some of my favorite cooking recipes; for the careful observer you might be able to pick up on a pattern......



    Bourbon Marinade
    Roger Bell sent me this marinade recipe that uses the power of bourbon to tenderize meat as well as add flavor. Be careful when this hits the grill, it might flare-up for a few seconds as the alcohol burns off.
    Prep Time: 10 minutes
    Total Time: 10 minutes
    Yield: Makes about 2 1/4 cups
    Ingredients:
    • 1 cup of reduced sodium or regular soy sauce
    • 1 cup of Heaven Hill bourbon (or other cheap brand) Note: The better bourbons do not work with this recipe.
    • 1 level tablespoon dry powdered ginger
    • 1 level tablespoon dry powdered mustard seed
    • 2 tablespoons of minced garlic


    Bourbon Barbecue Sauce
    Ingredients:
    • 1 Tablespoon butter
    • 1 Tablespoon olive oil
    • 2 cups finely chopped onion
    • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
    • 1/2 cup molasses
    • 1 cup ketchup
    • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
    • 1 teaspoon dry mustard
    • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    • 2 Tablespoons lemon juice
    • 1/2 teaspoon grated lemon zest
    • 1 Tablespoon soy sauce
    • 1 Tablespoon Hungarian paprika
    • 1/3 cup bourbon whiskey
    Preparation:
    In a large, heavy saucepan, melt the butter with the oil. Sauté the onions until tender. Add the garlic and cook 2 minutes longer.

    Combine the molasses, ketchup, vinegar, mustard, pepper, lemon juice, zest, soy sauce,paprika, and bourbon. Stir into onion mixture.

    Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Cool and refrigerate in a covered container.

    Yield: 2-1/2 cups



    ================================================== =======================================
    Bourbon Marinade

    Ingredients:
    Servings:
    8
    • 8 pork chops (about 3/4-inch thick or thicker or use 2 tenderloins)


    MARINADE
    • 3/4 cup low sodium soy sauce (use only low sodium)
    • 1/2 cup bourbon
    • 1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
    • 1/4 cup water
    • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
    • 2 tablespoons fresh minced garlic
    • 3 tablespoons brown sugar
    • 2 tablespoons black pepper
    • 1 teaspoon fresh minced gingerroot (or use 1/2 teaspoon dry ginger powder)
    Change Measurements: US | Metric
    Directions:
    Prep Time: 1/2 day
    Total Time: 1/2 day
    1. In a bowl whisk together the marinade ingredients; place in a large zip-loc plastic bag.
    2. Add in the pork chops or 2 pork tenderloins; seal the bag.
    3. Turn to coat with the marinade.
    4. Refrigerate for a minimum of 12 hours.
    5. Set grill to high heat (about 400°F).
    6. Remove the pork and discard the marinade.
    7. Place on grill.
    8. For pork chops cook for about 15 minutes on each side, depending on how thick your chops are.
    9. For pork tenderloins, cook for about 25 minutes turning occasionally or until the pork is cooked;
    tent with foil and let sit for about 10 minutes before slicing.


    Bourbon-Glazed Pork Chops

    Ingredients:
    Servings:

    6
    • 1/2 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
    • 3 tablespoons Dijon mustard
    • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
    • 2 tablespoons bourbon
    • 1/2 teaspoon salt
    • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
    • 6 pork chops (bone-in, 1-inch-thick)
    Change Measurements: US | Metric
    Directions:
    Prep Time: 40 mins
    Total Time: 54 mins
    1. In a shallow dish or large zip-lock heavy-duty freezer bag, stir together the first 6 ingredients; add in pork chops.
    2. Cover dish or seal bag and chill 30 minutes, turning once.
    3. Remove pork from marinade, reserving marinade.
    4. Grill pork over med-high heat, covered w/ grill lid for 10-12 minutes (or until done), turning once.
    5. Transfer reserved marinade to a saucepan; bring to a boil; cook, stirring occasionally, for 2 minutes.
    6. Pour sauce over chop and serve.

    Bourbon Mustard Marinated Pork Chops

    1/2 cup bourbon
    1/4 cup brown sugar
    1/2 cup vegetable oil
    1/2 cup spicy brown mustard (most any kind of mustard will work)
    1/2 tsp. garlic powder
    1 oz. Worcestershire sauce
    1 splash hot sauce
    2 green onions, chopped
    8 boneless pork chops (loin chops) 3/4-1″ thick (use thinner chops if you want to use them for sandwiches like I did)
    Combine all ingredients, except pork chops, in a large, 1 gallon zip lock bag and mix until sugar is dissolved. Add pork chops, seal and allow to marinate overnight. Prepare your grill for direct grilling over medium high heat. Remove chops from marinade and lightly blot dry. Season with a little salt and pepper and grill to desired doneness. I usually like my pork just slightly pink in the center so cook to about 150°F. Make sure to flip often as the sugar in the marinade has a tendency to burn. It should take about 8-10 minutes to cook.


    Pork Tenderloin in Bourbon


    Prep Time:
    15 Min
    Cook Time:
    45 Min
    Ready In:
    3 Hrs

    Ingredients
    • 1/4 cup soy sauce
    • 1/4 cup bourbon
    • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
    • 2 cloves garlic, halved
    • 3 pounds pork tenderloin
    Directions
    1. Mix together soy sauce, bourbon, brown sugar, and garlic. Pour over pork, cover, and refrigerate at least 2 hours, turning occasionally.
    2. Preheat oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C). Remove pork from marinade, and place on rack of shallow roasting pan.
    3. Bake for 45 minutes or until meat thermometer registers 160 degrees F/71 degrees C.


    Bourbon-Glazed Pork Chops and Peaches

    The bourbon and honey marinade cooks to become a sauce to serve with the chops. Be sure the marinade comes to a full boil in the microwave. Yield: 4 servings (serving size: 1 pork chop, 1 peach half, and 2 tablespoons sauce)
    Ingredients
    • 1/3 cup bourbon
    • 1/4 cup honey
    • 3 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce
    • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
    • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
    • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
    • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
    • 4 (4-ounce) boneless center-cut loin pork chops (about 3/4 inch thick), trimmed
    • 2 peaches, halved and pitted
    • Cooking spray
    Preparation
    Combine first 7 ingredients in a large bowl. Add pork chops and peaches; toss well to coat.
    Heat a nonstick grill pan coated with cooking spray over medium-high heat. Remove pork and peaches from bowl, reserving the marinade. Place pork and peaches on grill pan; cook 4 minutes on each side or until pork is done.
    While the pork chops cook, place marinade in a microwave-safe bowl; microwave marinade at HIGH 2 minutes. Spoon over pork and peaches.
    Nutritional Information
    Calories:
    285 (29% from fat)
    Fat:9.3g (sat 3.1g,mono 4.3g,poly 1.1g)
    Protein:26.4g
    Carbohydrate:24.3g
    Fiber:1.2g
    Cholesterol:73mg
    Iron:1.4mg

    Bourbon Beef Tenderloin

    Recipe courtesy Paula Deen
    Prep Time: 1 hr 0 min
    Cook Time: 45 min
    Ingredients
    • 1 cup bourbon
    • 1 cup brown sugar
    • 2/3 cup soy sauce
    • 1 bunch cilantro, leaves chopped
    • 1/2 cup lemon juice
    • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
    • 2 cups water
    • 3 to 4 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves chopped
    • 1 (5-pound) beef tenderloin, silver connective tissue removed
    • Oil, to brush grill
    Directions
    Preheat grill or oven to 350 degrees F.
    Prepare marinade by combining the bourbon, brown sugar, soy sauce, cilantro, lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce, water, and thyme in a bowl. Make sure the tenderloin has been cleaned and the tissues has been removed. Fold the tail end of the beef back underneath itself so that it is of uniform thickness and secure with butcher's string. Place meat in a dish and pour marinade over meat, cover, and refrigerate for 4 to 6 hours, or up to overnight, turning meat over several times.
    When grill is ready, place meat on oiled surface and reserve the liquid from the marinade. Cook over high heat with lid closed, turning meat often and occasionally basting with the marinade. Cook for approximately 25 minutes for medium rare.
    Serve with horseradish cream on the side.


    Beef Tenderloin With Bourbon


    Ingredients:
    • 1 cup good bourbon
    • 1 cup brown sugar
    • 2/3 cup soy sauce
    • 1 cup chopped cilantro
    • 1/2 cup lemon juice
    • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
    • 2 cups water
    • 1 teaspoon dried leaf thyme
    • 1 beef tenderloin, about 5 pounds, trimmed
    Preparation:
    Combine bourbon, brown sugar, soy sauce, cilantro, lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce, water, and thyme. Fold the tail end of the beef back underneath itself so that it is an even thickness. Secure with cooking twine and place in a nonreactive dish or pan. Pour marinade over tenderloin, cover, and refrigerate for 6 to 10 hours. Turn meat from time to time to keep it coated with marinade. Preheat oven to 400°.
    Roast, uncovered, basting occasionally, for 45 to 50 minutes for medium-rare to medium. Meat thermometer should read 140° for medium rare, 155° for medium.
    Serves 8 to 10.

    Bourbon Molasses Marinated Beef Tenderloin

    SERVINGS 4 servings scale / convert
    INGREDIENTS
    Marinade
    1 md. onion, chopped fine
    1/2 cup Bourbon
    1/4 cup unsulphured dark molasses
    (I also add 2 Tblsp brown sugar)
    2 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
    1 tsp. sweet mustard
    1/4 tsp. powdered ginger
    pinch crushed chille de Arbol or Cayenne

    Meat
    1 to 1-1/2 lb. beef tenderloin, cut into 8 medallions
    Salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste
    2 slices slab bacon, chopped
    1 tbsp. oil, preferably Canola or Corn
    INSTRUCTIONS
    In a small bowl, combine the marinade ingredients. Place the tenderloin medallions in a shallow non-reactive dish, and pour the marinade over the meat. Cover the meat, and refrigerate it for 2 to 4 hours, turning it once. Remove it from the refrigerator 20 to 30 minutes before cooking.

    Drain the medallions, and salt and pepper them. RESERVE 1/2 cup of the marinade.

    In a large cast-iron skillet, fry the bacon over medium heat until it is browned and crispy. Remove it with a slotted spoon, and drain it. Set aside the bacon, and reserve the drippings.

    Stir the oil into the drippings, raise the heat to medium high, and add the medallions. Cook them rare, about 3 minutes, turning once. Remove the steaks, pour the reserved marinade into the skillet, and raise the heat to high. Scrape up any browned bits from the bottom, and stir the marinade as it thickens into a glaze, which requires about 1 to 2 minutes.

    Working quickly, return the steaks to the skillet briefly to coat them with the glaze on both sides.

    Transfer the medallions to a decorative platter, sprinkle the bacon over, and serve immediately. Serves 4.
    Maple-Glazed Turkey with Bourbon-Pecan Gravy


    Maple-Glazed Turkey with Bourbon-Pecan Gravy



    SERVINGS: 10
    • MAKE-AHEAD
    INGREDIENTS
    1. One 18- to 20-pound turkey—neck and giblets reserved for another use
    2. 1 1/2 cups Kentucky bourbon
    3. 1/2 cup fresh orange juice
    4. 1/3 cup pure maple syrup
    5. 1 tablespoon chopped thyme
    6. Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
    7. 1 stick (4 ounces) unsalted butter, softened
    8. Water
    9. 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
    10. 4 cups Rich Turkey Stock
    11. 1/2 pound pecans (about 2 cups), lightly toasted and chopped

    DIRECTIONS
    1. Using your fingers, carefully loosen the skin over the turkey breast and thighs; try not to tear the skin. Set a large oven roasting bag in a very large bowl. Put the turkey in the bag, cavity end up.
    2. In a bowl, mix the bourbon with the orange juice, maple syrup, thyme and 1 1/2 teaspoons each of salt and pepper. Slowly pour the mixture under the turkey skin and press to distribute it evenly over the breast and thighs. Wrap the turkey tightly in the bag and seal with a twist tie. Refrigerate overnight. Bring to room temperature before roasting.
    3. Preheat the oven to 325°. Remove the turkey from the bag and set it in a large roasting pan. Pour the marinade into a large measuring cup. Rub 6 tablespoons of the butter under the breast skin and rub the remaining 2 tablespoons over the skin. Tie the turkey legs together with twine.
    4. Pour 1/2 cup of the reserved marinade into the roasting pan and roast the turkey for 30 minutes. Baste the turkey with the pan juices and add 1 cup of water to the pan. Roast the turkey for 1 hour longer, basting it every half hour. Add the remaining marinade to the pan. Cover the turkey loosely with aluminum foil and roast for about 2 hours longer, or until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the thickest part of the thigh registers 165°.
    5. Carefully transfer the turkey to a carving board, allowing the juices in the cavity to run into the pan. Cover loosely with foil and let rest for 30 minutes.
    6. Pour the pan juices into a bowl and skim the fat: reserve 6 tablespoons of the fat. In a large saucepan, mix the fat with the flour to form a paste. In a medium saucepan, warm the Rich Turkey Stock and slowly whisk it into the flour paste. Bring to a boil over moderate heat, whisking constantly. Whisk in the reserved pan juices and simmer over low heat, whisking frequently, until thickened and flavorful, about 25 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and stir in the pecans; transfer to a large gravy boat. Carve the turkey, arrange on a platter and serve with the pecan gravy




    RICH TURKEY STOCK

    • SERVINGS: MAKES ABOUT 3 QUARTS

    • MAKE-AHEAD
    Ingredients
    1. 8 pounds turkey parts, such as wings, necks and drumsticks
    2. 14 cups water
    3. Reserved turkey neck and giblets (except the liver)
    4. 1 large onion, thickly sliced
    5. 1 large carrot, thickly sliced
    6. 1 large celery rib, thickly sliced
    7. 2 garlic cloves, sliced
    8. 1 teaspoon kosher salt
    9. Freshly ground pepper
    Directions
    1. Preheat the oven to 400°. Put the turkey parts in a flameproof roasting pan and roast for about 1 hour, turning occasionally, until well browned. Transfer the turkey parts to a large pot.
    2. Set the roasting pan over 2 burners. Add 3 cup of the water and boil over moderately high heat, scraping up the browned bits from the bottom of the pan. Add the liquid to the pot.
    3. Add the turkey neck and giblets to the pot along with the onion, carrot, celery, garlic, salt, generous pinches of pepper, and the remaining 11 cups of water. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to moderately low and simmer the stock for about 2 1/2 hours. Strain the stock and skim the fat before using.

    Make Ahead
    The turkey stock can be refrigerated for up to 2 days or frozen for up to 1 month.
    ericb327 and rottkeeper like this.

  14. #43
    Distinguished Member Array ericb327's Avatar
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    For to win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the acme of skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the acme of skill. (Sun Tzu) The Art of War

    https://www.facebook.com/ninja312


    My food and product review blog
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  15. #44
    Distinguished Member Array kapnketel's Avatar
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    The OP in his blog discusses the ability to get fresh herbs as a key to good cooking. I agree, but the problem is not always having a garden available in a three season locale. We decided to try a living wall for herbs indoors. So far so good, Probably going to have to expand. This is a product called VertiGrow on our entry way hall (lemongrass and Greek oregano in the pot):
    Living wall.JPG

    The added benefit is the house smells great.
    ericb327 likes this.
    I'd rather be lucky than good any day

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    Majority rule only works if you're also considering individual rights. Because you can't have five wolves and one sheep voting on what to have for supper.

  16. #45
    Distinguished Member Array ericb327's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapnketel View Post
    The OP in his blog discusses the ability to get fresh herbs as a key to good cooking. I agree, but the problem is not always having a garden available in a three season locale. We decided to try a living wall for herbs indoors. So far so good, Probably going to have to expand. This is a product called VertiGrow on our entry way hall (lemongrass and Greek oregano in the pot):
    Living wall.JPG

    The added benefit is the house smells great.
    That's a great idea! I plant my herbs next to my house because the residual heat helps them through the winter. With last year's mild winter I had sage, thyme and rosemary all through the winter. I cook a lot with lemon grass, how well does it do?
    For to win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the acme of skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the acme of skill. (Sun Tzu) The Art of War

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    My food and product review blog
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