Books worth reading?

This is a discussion on Books worth reading? within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Originally Posted by f8guy About to start Atlas Shrugged, it's been sitting by my chair for months. Every time I pick it up I intimidated ...

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  1. #31
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by f8guy View Post
    About to start Atlas Shrugged, it's been sitting by my chair for months. Every time I pick it up I intimidated by its size.
    And just wait 'til you get to the Galt speech, in the tail portions of the book. It'll probably sit for awhile after a few pages of that, too. But don't worry: it's all good, if a bit wordy. There's so much meat in the story, raising questions about the insanity of the looter-vs-producer mentalities, that it'll be something that sticks with you long after you've turned the last page.

    Well worth the read.
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  3. #32
    Ex Member Array pscipio03's Avatar
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    More importantly, how a book written 60 years ago is essentially a crystal ball for where we are today.

  4. #33
    VIP Member Array oakchas's Avatar
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    Want to learn about how "Randian" thought messed up the economy (today's economy)?

    Read Griftopia by Matt Taibi.

    Alan Greenspan was a "card holding member" of "The Collective" which was Ayn Rand's "secret society."


    Remember... everything can be read from a different perspective...
    It could be worse.
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  5. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by pscipio03 View Post
    More importantly, how a book written 60 years ago is essentially a crystal ball for where we are today.
    1984 could fit into that description.

    On a lighter note "A Confederacy Of Dunces" is a great book, 1981 Pulitzer Price winner for fiction.

  6. #35
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    John D McDonald's Travis McGee series

    When Technology Fails, by Matthew Stein

    Citizen Soldiers by Stephen Ambrose or any other WWII book by him

    Rise to Rebellion and The Glorious Cause by Jeff Shaara

    With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa by Eugene Sledge
    “You can sway a thousand men by appealing to their prejudices quicker than you can convince one man by logic.”

    ― Robert A. Heinlein,

  7. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by pscipio03 View Post
    More importantly, how a book written 60 years ago is essentially a crystal ball for where we are today.
    Eh, it's an easily discredited philosophy that only has any bearing on today because people followed her insane Objectivist ideas.

    1984/Brave New World are more like today.
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  8. #37
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    [QUOTE=oakchas;2442536]Want to learn about how "Randian" thought messed up the economy (today's economy)?

    Read Griftopia by Matt Taibi.

    Alan Greenspan was a "card holding member" of "The Collective" which was Ayn Rand's "secret society."

    Okay, unfortunately Taibi is a political writer (hard core professed progressive), who tried his hand at economics. I've read his stuff on Huffpost and tried reading Griftopia, but having an advanced degree in econ, I could tell it was akin to George Lucas writing a book on astrophysics because of his experience creating Star Wars. I can give you a detailed diatribe on his mistakes, primarily in the housing bubble and his failure to understand Fed control, but that's not what this thread is about and I'm not going to hijack it.
    As for Greenspan, he sold out under the Clinton admin to keep ahold of power. Any true invisible hand theories he believed in went out the door in pursuit of keeping power.

    Off my soapbox. As for another good read, I'm trying to think of a Stephen King novel I did not enjoy. Coming up blank.

  9. #38
    Member Array ping.brady's Avatar
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    I read all sorts of stuff, but here's a couple for this audience:

    • The Mission, The Men, and Me: Lessons from a Former Delta Force Commander by Pete Blaber (have read this book several times)
    • Holding Their Own (series) by Joe Nobody (I'm about 1/2 way through series now. Pretty good books)
    • Lights Out by David Crawford (this was a great read)
    • Half Past Midnight by Jeff Brackett (not great, not terrible)
    • 77 Days in September by Ray Gorham (Makes you think about getting home. Didn't like the book at first, but then it became a page turner)
    • Easy Day: The Firsthand Account of the Mission That Killed Osama Bin Laden by Mark Owen (good book by a frogman, nuff said)
    • Patriots by James Wesley Rawles (I heard Founders wasn't that great, have yet to pick it up. Here's JWR's blog: SurvivalBlog.com)

  10. #39
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    [QUOTE=pscipio03;2442676]
    Quote Originally Posted by oakchas View Post
    Want to learn about how "Randian" thought messed up the economy (today's economy)?

    Read Griftopia by Matt Taibi.

    Alan Greenspan was a "card holding member" of "The Collective" which was Ayn Rand's "secret society."

    Okay, unfortunately Taibi is a political writer (hard core professed progressive), who tried his hand at economics. I've read his stuff on Huffpost and tried reading Griftopia, but having an advanced degree in econ, I could tell it was akin to George Lucas writing a book on astrophysics because of his experience creating Star Wars. I can give you a detailed diatribe on his mistakes, primarily in the housing bubble and his failure to understand Fed control, but that's not what this thread is about and I'm not going to hijack it.
    As for Greenspan, he sold out under the Clinton admin to keep ahold of power. Any true invisible hand theories he believed in went out the door in pursuit of keeping power.

    Off my soapbox. As for another good read, I'm trying to think of a Stephen King novel I did not enjoy. Coming up blank.
    Taibbi makes sense as the one to deconstruct it, because Ayn Rand was a hack who didn't understand too much about economics either. Then again I remember someone said you only understand economics to decipher the nonsense economists say.

  11. #40
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    If economics was a science... we wouldn't be having the problems we are having.

    It ain't.

    We do.
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    It could be worse.
    "The History of our Revolution will be one continued Lye from one end to the other."
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    "A gun is kind of like a parachute. If you need one and don't have one, you'll probably never need one again".

  12. #41
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    Rather than argue Taibi v Rand, I recommend the books by Ha-Joon Chang:
    "23 things they don't tell you about capitalism," and "Bad Samaritans."

    The first is not what it sounds like. It does however demolish the neo-liberalism school
    of economics of the Friedman variety.

    Since he is an econ Prof at Cambridge in the UK, a Korean, and not an American, he is able
    to present economic arguments without getting entangled in US political dogmas.
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  13. #42
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    OK, I read TONS of books. Some serious and some just plain old fiction. One book that has no real meaning and isn't a classic is one of my all time favorites. It's just a good suspenseful read with a great twist at the end that I promise you will never see coming..........Are you ready.......Have i built it up enough yet.....


    Lightning by Dean Koontz


    It's available at just about any public library and, for a great read, I suggest you give it a shot.
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  14. #43
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    I forgot

    The Party’s Over: Oil, War, and the Fate of Industrial Society by Richard Heinberg
    “You can sway a thousand men by appealing to their prejudices quicker than you can convince one man by logic.”

    ― Robert A. Heinlein,

  15. #44
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    There are some great choices mentioned but I can't believe On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society by Dave Grossman hasn't been mentioned (unless someone slipped it in while I wasn't looking).
    "I believe there are more instances of the abridgment of the freedom of the people by gradual and silent encroachments of those in power, than by violent and sudden usurpations” – James Madison 1788

  16. #45
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    Why doesn't anyone ever mention Rand's "The fountainhead"? I liked it better than "Atlas Shrugged". Or maybe I just liked the characters better....heck. I don't know. Both of the books are tough to really like if you ask me.

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