Any readers? - Great books! - Page 2

Any readers? - Great books!

This is a discussion on Any readers? - Great books! within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; A Confederacy of Dunces - Toole Catch 22 - Heller Slaughterhouse 5 - Vonegut Ham on Rye - Bukowski Say what you will, but those ...

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Thread: Any readers? - Great books!

  1. #16
    Senior Member Array Cold Shot's Avatar
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    A Confederacy of Dunces - Toole
    Catch 22 - Heller
    Slaughterhouse 5 - Vonegut
    Ham on Rye - Bukowski

    Say what you will, but those are my favorite novels ever. If an author can make me laugh through out the entire book, I'm fairly impressed. These were all hysterical.
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  2. #17
    Senior Member Array NCSoxFan's Avatar
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    Good call, Cold Shot. Catch 22 is one of my favorites. My all time favorite read is "Slow Walk in a Sad Rain" by John P. McAfee, about a Special Forces A Team's experiences in Viet Nam. Not a well known book, but some refer to it as the Catch 22 of the Viet Nam war.

  3. #18
    VIP Member Array Badey's Avatar
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    If you like to read, and have a long commute, try listening to classic books for free on your iPod. There are several thousand free books (no catches) at librivox.org. I have listened to at least 200 books from there over the past few years. Some of the readers are bad, some are excellent.

    As far as audio books go

    -anything Mark Twain
    -anything Jules Vern
    -most Charles Dickens books

    Modern books at Amazon that I thought were good

    -The Remaining series (zombie fiction - best I've read by far in this genre)
    -Atlas Shrugged (very long, but eye-opening)
    -299 Days series (book 4 isn't as good as the first 3... books 5 & 6 should be out in a week or so)

    Classic Books on Amazon

    -The Secret Adversary (great plot twist)
    -The Young Adventurers (slow start, but pretty good after that)
    Though defensive violence will always be a sad necessity in the eyes of men of principle, it would be still more unfortunate if wrongdoers should dominate just men -St. Augustine

  4. #19
    Senior Member Array NCSoxFan's Avatar
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    You know the anti-gun lurkers poking around on here won't know what to make of us discussing books.

  5. #20
    New Member Array DocHunter's Avatar
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    Any readers? - Great books!

    I read voraciously from several genres'. Currently reading "The Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965" the final book of a trilogy biography of Churchill started by William Manchester & completed after his death by Paul Reid.

  6. #21
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    Next on my list is Oliver North's book, "Heroes Proved". I already down loaded it and it's ready to go!
    It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others.

    http://www.timeanddate.com/countdown...eaves%20office

  7. #22
    Distinguished Member Array Brady's Avatar
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    Other then the Bible, got these off the shelf lately and been perusing through them again;
    I've mentioned before how much better I love abebooks.com than Amazon for hard to find copies..

    History of the Formation of the Union Under The Constitution.
    Rep. Sol Bloom, NY, Director General
    History of the Formation of the Union under the Constitution, with Liberty Documents and Report of the Commission by Sol Bloom | Questia, Your Online Research Library

    Sol Bloom - History of the Formation of the Union Under The Constitution - AbeBooks


    Words That Made America Great
    Jerome Agel
    Jerome Agel - Words That Make America Great - AbeBooks
    ...he that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one. Luke 22:36
    USN/VET; NRA; GOA, jpfo.org
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  8. #23
    Distinguished Member Array CT-Mike's Avatar
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    1776 is a great book chronicling the colonial army's trials and tribulations of that year. Things just started to turn at the end of the year. I was pissed at the end because there wasn't a sequel to carry on the story.
    "The natural progress of things is for liberty to yield, and government to gain ground."

    - Thomas Jefferson

    "I'm the arrow, you're my bow, shoot me forth and I will go"

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  9. #24
    Distinguished Member Array lchamp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeanlouise View Post


    I'm a big Vince Flynn fan. I think I've read almost all his books. They're like crack though, if I start reading one I can't put it down.

    You made me do it...we just ordered 2 Vince Flynn books...

    We're both big Clancy and Cussler fans. Sounds like Flynn will be interesting.
    Jeanlouise likes this.

  10. #25
    Member Array R040607's Avatar
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    Any readers? - Great books!

    In honor of Chris Kyle I'll recommend American Sniper. I give this book a 4 out of 5.

    “American Sniper” is retired Navy SEAL sniper Chris Kyle’s account of how he became the deadliest sniper in U.S. military history, with more than 160 officially confirmed kills in the Iraq War from 2003 to 2009.

    Of particular interest is Mr. Kyle’s explanation of how the military services’ special operations units operate, with each having a specialty. The Army Rangers, for example, make up a large assault force, while SEALs operate as quick surgical strike forces against small but high-value targets.

    The book’s narrative turns dramatic when Operation Iraqi Freedom began in March 2003 and he became a gunner in forward-deployed SEAL scout missions that supported Army and Marine Corps units as they advanced rapidly throughout the country to defeat Saddam Hussein’s army. With opposition elements, including al Qaeda, beginning to mount an armed insurgency, Mr. Kyle’s sniper specialty became indispensable, especially in rural and urban warfare environments. In the great distances afforded by a rural countryside, his shots would run from 800 to 1,200 yards. In the proximity of urban combat, where he made most of his kills, the range of his shots was 200 to 400 feet.

    Along with the regular military forces his units were supporting, their missions were required, he explains, because the insurgents were resisting the pacification of their areas, which was a precondition for stabilizing the conditions for infrastructure reconstruction and state building to commence. For a sniper, understanding mission objectives was crucial because he had to be careful to distinguish between insurgents and innocent bystanders.

    “Make an unjustified shot and you could be charged with murder,” he writes.

    His exploits earned him legendary stature. In the course of battles in some of the country’s most dangerous cities, such as Fallujah and Ramadi, when U.S. soldiers were fighting running battles in the streets against thousands of insurgents, he killed so many insurgents that the Ramadi insurgents singled him out. They put out a $20,000 bounty on his head and gave him the name “Al-Shaitan Ramadi” - “the Devil of Ramadi.”

    His most legendary shot was outside Sadr City in 2008 when he spotted an insurgent with a rocket launcher near an Army convoy. The distance of 2,100 yards was too far for his scope to “even dial up the shooting solution,” but he killed the insurgent anyway with a shot from his .338 rifle.

    For his valor in battle, he received two Silver Stars and five Bronze Medals.

    One of the book’s dramatic leitmotifs involves Mr. Kyles’ marriage to his wife, Taya. Like many other military wives, she braved through the birth and early lives of their two children as well as tensions in their relationship while he was overseas, including his numerous injuries and various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder after his periodic returns from his dangerous deployments in Iraq. Yet their love for each other, her inner strength and their enduring religious faith were strong enough to sustain their marriage.

    After leaving the Navy in 2009, he returned to his native Texas and established Craft International, a firm that provides military and law enforcement sniper training as well as private security protection. He volunteers his time with wounded-warrior foundations.

    ImageUploadedByTapatalk1359898215.181532.jpg

    I edited this summary from the Washington Times.

  11. #26
    Member Array MoMike's Avatar
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    I have read and re-read all of the "Clan of the Cave Bear" series , also the series beginning with "People of the Wolf".

    The Clan of the Cave Bear series deals with a mixing of Neanderthal and Cro-Magnon early man. The People series deals with very early North American Indians.

    If W. E. B. Griffin has written it, I've read it.

    Also really like Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan series of books ( Hunt for Red October, Executive Orders, etc. )

    Read, I think, most of John Jakes' books ( The Blue and the Gray, all of the Kent Family Chronicles)

    And, of course, a little Louis L'Amour always works well!

    And, I'm very sorry to say to the poster above, I have just now read that Chris Kyle was killed yesterday in Texas.
    Cape Locum Et Fac Vestigium

  12. #27
    Senior Member Array Dennis1209's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DontTreadOnI View Post
    I just finished reading the Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin via Hopyard's recommendation and was pretty fascinated by it, he was a very interesting man.

    Next up is the biography of Alexander Hamilton, which is about 600 pages longer. Yikes.
    Indeed, Alexander Hamilton was an interesting and complex fellow and had President Washington's ear. His idea of a paper fiat currency and stock exchange was nothing new at the time, but he should have known it always ends the same, in debasement and collapse.

    Had Aaron Burr shot him a decade earlier, I wonder if we would have still adopted a faith based fiat reserve system?

    At any rate, his thinking was the same as most governments and bankers of today... How can the King shave off some gold / purity of the coin for themselves and the people not notice?
    I think, therefore I am...

    <the Menace>

  13. #28
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    Hemingway. I've recently gone back and read all of his classics and have a new-found appreciation for them now that someone in school wasn't forcing me to read them. I've always read and re-read his collection of short stories and carried a well worn copy of his mini-opus "The Old Man and the Sea" in my briefcase for years for times when I was stuck at an airport in the days before e-readers, smart phones, and iPads. However, I recently went back and read "The Sun Also Rises" and "For Whom the Bell Tolls" and was stunned at their quality. I also read "Islands in the Stream", one of his novels that was refined and published after his death.

    Cheers
    One Riot, One Ranger. Long live the Republic of Texas.

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  14. #29
    Member Array Smilinswordsman's Avatar
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    Sci-fi: Starship Troopers by Robert Heinlein, Old Man's War by John Scalzi

    Post Apocalyptic: One Second After by William Forstchen (sp?), The Hunger Games

  15. #30
    Member Array Scramble4a5's Avatar
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    I have always been a big fan of World War II spy novels. I stumbled on to an Alan Furst book a few years ago and have read all of his work. He writes from the European perspective and I thoroughly enjoy his storytelling.

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