gasoline storage

This is a discussion on gasoline storage within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Just purchased a very large generator for power outages. I have a friend who is an electrician, and he is going to hook it up ...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 21
Like Tree8Likes

Thread: gasoline storage

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array bunker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    work
    Posts
    797

    gasoline storage

    Just purchased a very large generator for power outages. I have a friend who is an electrician, and he is going to hook it up so when power goes out, i can run most of house from it. Question is, it may use up to 10 gallons of gasoline/day, so i need to store quite a bit of fuel. Is is safe to store up to (ten) 5 gallon plastic red cans of gas in detached garage? I plan on using fuel stabilizer to keep it fresh. I usually have two of them out there, but my Dad is telling me storing large quantities of gas is unsafe. It is a three car garage, and has two windows for good ventilation. I dont see how storing ten containers is any more dangerous than 2? Also, is there a larger container that i should be looking into that is better? 5 gallon gas cans run around $17 each, so it will add up quickly. thanks. bunker
    "6 P's of self defense "
    Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #2
    VIP Member
    Array MrBuckwheat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Down Incognito
    Posts
    5,669

    gasoline storage

    Your fine!
    We used to store lots of fuel for our race cars back in the day! Ok 15 years ago
    Fast is fine, but accuracy is everything.
    Wyatt Earp

  4. #3
    Member Array awanatech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    58
    Yes, you'll be fine storing the gas that way. It would be good to even use that gas in your cars every once in a while and then refill the cans for your generator. Even using the stabilizer, it would be good to rotate stock periodically (I'm thinking of every 2-3 months if you haven't used it).
    darbo likes this.

  5. #4
    Member Array JoeFriday's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Dallas
    Posts
    277
    Don't forget that you have mobile gas storage devices in your garage already. If push comes to shove, I'll take cars out of service and pull from their tanks. That should buy you at least a day and a half.
    msgt/ret and darbo like this.

  6. #5
    Member Array AZ_Larz_NY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Chandler
    Posts
    288
    Bunker,
    You should be fine. Just make sure it is well ventilated. Also if it gets hot in there, make sure to relieve some pressure on the cans. I would also stop by your local fire department and let them know what you have there.

    Be safe!
    NEVER point a gun at something you are not prepared to destroy!
    AND for GODS sake, get your finger off the trigger until you are ready to squeeze the trigger!

  7. #6
    New Member Array Gangplank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    9

    gasoline storage

    Rotate cans into cars. Modern gas doesn't keep well. Even with stabil.
    OldVet and darbo like this.

  8. #7
    Member Array GetSmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    California
    Posts
    332
    Do you have any petroleum distributors in your area? I'd look into having a couple of 55 gallon drums delivered. I had a drum of kerosen delivered and there was no charge for the drum it self. $20 per container adds up quick. Store any container off the ground ( on a pallet ) to reduce condensation and cycle the gas in your vehicles every couple of months.

  9. #8
    Moderator
    Array gasmitty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ
    Posts
    9,532
    Although it may realistically be safe, your local fire marshal and building codes may suggest otherwise. You need to inquire about these; if the worst was to happen and you were not in compliance with local codes, your insurance company would probably not pay for your loss. Just something you need to consider.

    Gasoline vapors are heavier than air, so unless your garage windows are mounted at ground level, the mere presence of windows does not imply adequate ventilation.

    Not to give you buyer's remorse, but fuel storage is a major reason why large standby generators are commonly fueled with LP gas or Diesel. One of the tradeoffs is between availability of fuel and safety of fuel storage.
    AZ_Larz_NY and atctimmy like this.
    Smitty
    NRA Endowment Member

  10. #9
    Member Array MnemonicMonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    172
    "Lord, help me to be the person my dog thinks I am."

  11. #10
    Senior Member Array zamboni's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    North of the Line
    Posts
    1,159
    I have stored gas in tightly-capped 5-gal plastic gas cans for up 4-months or so without using any stabilizer. With all the additives the refineries add to gas now days I personally don't think you need to add another one. I have never had any problems. They store gas for months at a time sometimes before it is delivered to the pumps.

    Just keep it capped tight, out of direct sunlight, in a cool place, inspect your cans for leaks and blotting, and keep them far away from sparks and open flames. It's not so much the liquid gas itself but the fumes that are more volatile to sparks, flame, and cause an explosion. If a closed in area becomes too engulfed with any type of flammable gas fumes, simply flicking on a light switch can spark an explosion.

    1 ) DO NOT STORE GAS FILLED CANS INSIDE YOUR HOME LIVING-AREA

    2) DO NOT STORE GAS FILLED CANS IN YOUR BASEMENT

    3) DO NOT STORE STORE GAS FILLED CANS INSIDE ANY INCLOSED AREA WITHOUT PROPER VENTALATION

    After 4-months or so, what-ever is left in my gas cans. I put it in my vehicles and fill it with a fresh supply. I put a piece of blue painters tape on the can and mark the date I filled it to keep track of time.

    As for owning and maintaining a gasoline fueled generator:
    Put a tag on it with the dated of the last time you ran it. Put about a qt of gas in it and start it every 4 to 6 weeks and let it run till the gas runs out. If you do not let it run out of gas, there's a good chance it will not start if you let it sit for too long with gas in the tank and the lines.

    I don't care what additives you add to your fuel, letting it sit for TOO LONG with fuel in the lines and tank will dissolve the plasticizers in the lines and some of the parts, and WILL cause premature deterioration of those parts. AND the fuel supply will become tainted with those byproducts and WILL ruin and clog delicate parts.

    YMMV

  12. #11
    Distinguished Member Array Arborigine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Calaveras County, California
    Posts
    1,384
    With a bunch of vehicles and power equipment I go cheap on fuel stabilizer. The active ingredient in most brands is BHT (butyl-hydroxytoulene) , the food stabilizer available at the organic food store in town. Four tablespoons treats 20 gallons. It doesn't do much to protect pastics and rubber from long term exposure to the ethanol in gas or the fatty acids in bio-diesel, but I don't know of anything that does.
    Definately go extreme on the fire safety, the vapor from a tiny leak can make big trouble.
    I don't always have nothing to say, but when I do, I post it on Facebook.

  13. #12
    Member Array HillyBilly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    66044
    Posts
    56
    If you don't already have an inline shut-off on your generator install one so when you shut it off turn the gas off to the carb & run it dry. The reverse when you re-start it. Starts a lot easier & saves carb troubles.

  14. #13
    VIP Member
    Array OldVet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    S. Florida, north of the Miami mess, south of the Mouse trap
    Posts
    14,598
    With the alcohol additive these days, gasoline tends to collect water. I found out the hard way with my boat. Even with fuel stabilizer added, you'll want to use that gas every couple of months and refill. When you need gas for the car, dump your stored gas in the car and go top off the tank and refuel your cans.

    As for storage, as long as there's not source of ignition (electrical motors running, gas pilot lights, etc.) and the gas cans are sealed, there should be no problems. Some municipalities may have an ordinance on how much gas can be stored and how. Check. If you open teh doors and smell gas--check!
    Retired USAF E-8. Avatar is OldVet from days long gone. Oh, to be young again.
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... "For What It's Worth" Buffalo Springfield

  15. #14
    VIP Member Array HKinNY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Nassau, NY(Long Island)
    Posts
    2,855
    I would raise the policy limits on the item that you own.
    You do not know, what you do not know, until you realize that you do not know it

  16. #15
    Distinguished Member Array dben002's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Kernersville NC
    Posts
    1,388
    would probably build an outdoor storage shed with LOTS OF VENTILATION. just saying.....
    There are two types of people who carry concealed weapons...Responsible ones and Irresponsible ones...which are you...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

gasoline storage bunker

,

gasoline storage generator

,

gasoline storage on your porch

,

is there a self standing 20 gallon fuel tank for ur home garage

,

my dad is storing gasoline in garage

Click on a term to search for related topics.