Nest Thermostat

Nest Thermostat

This is a discussion on Nest Thermostat within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Has anyone actually had and used it ? Its time to set up electricity at the house when we move-in in 2 weeks. Its catching ...

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Thread: Nest Thermostat

  1. #1
    Member Array Newman5's Avatar
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    Nest Thermostat

    Has anyone actually had and used it ?

    Its time to set up electricity at the house when we move-in in 2 weeks. Its catching my eye. I can sign up with the Nest at 11.9c kwh for 2 years. Or go with a normal plan at like 9.7c kwh.

    My question if any of yall have used it, will I actually see savings with it ?



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  2. #2
    Member Array RookWV's Avatar
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    I haven't yet but I've looked at them and read about them a bit. I also contacted their support people to make sure my current system would work and they were very prompt and very helpful, providing both written instruction and pictures.

    I like the concept and believe that it would save you money over the long haul, just how long is the only question. It's not excessively expensive and firmware/software updates are free I believe.

  3. #3
    VIP Member Array lionround's Avatar
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    I don't understand why your electric rate would be dependent on what type of thermostat you have. It appears that the Nest rate is about 20% higher than the non Nest rate. So, before you save any money with it, you would have to use at least 20% less electricity.

    I looked at it for my house, but had just replaced my thermostat before I saw this one. I think they are kewl, but am going to wait.
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    I don't understand how you can save money by spending more money. No thank you.
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    New Member Array allegory's Avatar
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    I think the extra $0.02/kwh is supposed to pay for them giving him a Nest thermostat... i know a few people that use it, not sure about their savings though. i think the savings depends on whether or not you would set the thermostat down when you leave normally anyway. if you do, then savings will be reduced quite a bit.

    i've looked at them but never found it good enough to switch...

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    Member Array knowltk's Avatar
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    I just looked at the Nest site and the Reliant site, and it looks like the thermostat is free except that you pay 2.2c per kwh extra and the deal goes for 2 years. According to something I found on the internet, the average american house uses 11,500 kwh per year. So we have (2.2c extra per kwh) * 11,500 kwh per year * 2 years = about $250. You can buy this thermostat for $250 from amazon.

    Surprise, surprise. What it amounts to is that if you take their deal, and if you use about the average amount of electricity, you will pay them $250 by way of higher electric rates. Or, you could pay the lower rate and buy one on your own for $250. Or, of course, you could do neither and just get the lower rate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by knowltk View Post
    I just looked at the Nest site and the Reliant site, and it looks like the thermostat is free except that you pay 2.2c per kwh extra and the deal goes for 2 years. According to something I found on the internet, the average american house uses 11,500 kwh per year. So we have (2.2c extra per kwh) * 11,500 kwh per year * 2 years = about $250. You can buy this thermostat for $250 from amazon.

    Surprise, surprise. What it amounts to is that if you take their deal, and if you use about the average amount of electricity, you will pay them $250 by way of higher electric rates. Or, you could pay the lower rate and buy one on your own for $250. Or, of course, you could do neither and just get the lower rate.
    According to this (How much electricity does an American home use? - FAQ - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)) average usage in Texas for a year would be 15,144 kWh, so that makes things worse.

    That said, I have no doubt a Nest will save on energy, but will it come quickly enough to make it worth them subsidizing it by charging you a higher rate? My guess is no... they are in it to make money ;)

    I have had my Nest since last June and I love it, but it is hard to figure out exactly what it has saved due to some of the differences in weather we have seen when comparing current year to the previous and the change in rate during that time as well.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Array nontechguy's Avatar
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    Thanks, but no thanks. My 8 year old $30.00 set back thermastat works fine.
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    Distinguished Member Array phreddy's Avatar
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    I installed a progamable thermostat years ago and based on our historical energy usage, we saved about 20%. I programmed it around our lifestyle and so that we did not keep the house at the same temperature when we were not home. In the winter I also lowered the house temperture while we were sleeping to 60. I think the main advantage of gthe nest is that it is easy to program as it "learns" what you want. I am not sure it is worth the extra money. The programmable thermostats that I put in cost $47 each.
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    I don't see how this could be a savings either. The company gives you a thermostat and then charges you more to use it? Is this something your electric company provides? If not, how does the Nest company collect the fee?

    What kind of heat system do you use? Forced air or a heat pump?

    If you have forced air, programable thermostats are the way to go. If you have a heat pump, pick a temperature that you feel comfortable with and leave it at that. If you raise the temperature more than 2 degrees at a time with a heat pump, it will kick into "emergency heat" and run on straight electric, which is very expensive, until it reaches the set temperature. That's why programable thermostats aren't cost saving for heat pumps outside of a 2 degree difference. If you're going away for awhile, of course you would set the temperature lower.

    There are lots of ways you can save on electricity, but I'd be careful of the "Nest", it doesn't sound like any savings to me.
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    Distinguished Member Array kapnketel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeanlouise View Post
    I don't see how this could be a savings either. The company gives you a thermostat and then charges you more to use it? Is this something your electric company provides? If not, how does the Nest company collect the fee?

    What kind of heat system do you use? Forced air or a heat pump?

    If you have forced air, programable thermostats are the way to go. If you have a heat pump, pick a temperature that you feel comfortable with and leave it at that. If you raise the temperature more than 2 degrees at a time with a heat pump, it will kick into "emergency heat" and run on straight electric, which is very expensive, until it reaches the set temperature. That's why programable thermostats aren't cost saving for heat pumps outside of a 2 degree difference. If you're going away for awhile, of course you would set the temperature lower.

    There are lots of ways you can save on electricity, but I'd be careful of the "Nest", it doesn't sound like any savings to me.
    Jean, not neccessarily true for the more modern heat pumps. I Last year we installed a complete new system (and did that hurt the pocket book, LOL) and it is a multi-stage unit that slowly ramps up without using the emergency heat. It actually learns how long it takes to reach the new set temperature and then starts accordingly to reach desired temps based on your programming. It is a Trane with their whizz bang thermostat.

    To me if you really want to save $$, upgrade your system. Big hit on the front end, but long term benefits. Our unit was 10K, it saves us $150/month and it is far more comfortable. With the energy tax credit, it pays for itself in about 8 years.
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapnketel View Post
    Jean, not neccessarily true for the more modern heat pumps. I Last year we installed a complete new system (and did that hurt the pocket book, LOL) and it is a multi-stage unit that slowly ramps up without using the emergency heat. It actually learns how long it takes to reach the new set temperature and then starts accordingly to reach desired temps based on your programming. It is a Trane with their whizz bang thermostat.

    To me if you really want to save $$, upgrade your system. Big hit on the front end, but long term benefits. Our unit was 10K, it saves us $150/month and it is far more comfortable. With the energy tax credit, it pays for itself in about 8 years.
    That's a good feature! We just upgraded our system last year too, I wonder if we have that feature. We have Heil and really like them. We had a programable thermostat but one of the HVAC guys told me not to program it more than 2 degrees. I'll have to test it out. I agree with the system upgrade. HP's are nothing like they were a few years ago!
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