Question for people with cats

This is a discussion on Question for people with cats within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; I got two older cats around 10 & 12. They weigh 13 & 15 lbs and want to eat 24/7. I have stopped leaving out ...

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    Question for people with cats

    I got two older cats around 10 & 12. They weigh 13 & 15 lbs and want to eat 24/7. I have stopped leaving out food all night because it will draw bugs and to cut back on their weight. Needless to say they are NOT happy and I'm having to squirt them with water in the morning to stop them from bothering me and waking me up.

    I want to get them on a schedule like the dog is whereas I feed them in the morning about 20 min after I get up and then at dinner time and then give them a snack (spoon full of wet food) before bed. This is not going over well at all and I need advice from those that may know.

    Do I have to keep food out all the time for them? Why can't they just eat like the dog does, twice a day with a snack?

    How often do you feed your cat(s) and what are the chances that my fat boys will get use to this? How much is enough to feed cats, I'm feeding can and dry but now days they are barfing the dry so I'm down to the wet food now.
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    VIP Member Array zonker1986's Avatar
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    I leave food out all the time for his Highness so he can dine when he wants. Purina Indoor Cat Chow seems to fit his tastes. Something about cats cannot store protein like other animals makes them want to snack constantly. Don't think for a minute you will change your cat's desire to have food out for them all the time......you won't. I grew up with cats, have had cats my entire adult life. One constant. Cats will do what they will do, and not on your timetable. No food available at 5am when they want it, and you will pay the price.

    My neighbor tried to limit the amount he fed his cat.....and the cat promptly decided to adopt me, because I leave food out for my cat when he is outside.
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    TY Zonker, my princes are going to keep getting squirted until either they learn or they may be kenneled at night. They don't go outside and I know the weight can't be good for them. I'm really hoping somebody will tell me their cat will eat on a schedule. I couldn't imagine all those rolls of fat not having some kind of protein stored, lol. We do put food outside but that is for not only a stray but the coon and the fox.
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    We have 3 cats, but my wife and kids take care of them - that was the deal when I agreed to let them in the house. Ours get feisty when they are hungry and tend to knock over lamps and other items when they are not happy. This tends to make me unhappy. Thus, the kids either leave a full bowl of food for them or lock them in their rooms.

    Not the answer you're looking for, but it is how we handle it...
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    Distinguished Member Array ArkhmAsylm's Avatar
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    I do not envy your monumental task - meal retraining for two adult cats.

    We do leave food out 24/7 for our indoor cat horde. We've got five of the critters (ages 5,5,2,2,2) and two are currently on fat-butt-watch.

    I would opt for the two separate feedings...and the snack might not be a bad idea for the immediate future. Make sure you measure the food so that you may make adjustments as necessary. Good luck to you, m'lady.
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    Kind of a schedule. My son and I leave in the the morning, him to school and me to work. A little dry food in bowl.
    I come home for lunch and add a little to his bowl.
    Evening time I give him a few treats and some table scraps. No more dry food till morning.
    If weight is a problem, cut back gradually like half a spoonful every couple of days.

    If they don't lay on your face and smother you or claw your throat as you sleep, you should be alright....
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    VIP Member Array zonker1986's Avatar
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    just like people, cats get fat if they don't exercise. My cat likes to play outside as much as possible, and he is a lean mean fighting machine. When he was only an indoor cat, he was getting a bit chunky.

    Kitty Health Club membership?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sister View Post
    I got two older cats around 10 & 12. They weigh 13 & 15 lbs and want to eat 24/7. I have stopped leaving out food all night because it will draw bugs and to cut back on their weight. Needless to say they are NOT happy and I'm having to squirt them with water in the morning to stop them from bothering me and waking me up.

    I want to get them on a schedule like the dog is whereas I feed them in the morning about 20 min after I get up and then at dinner time and then give them a snack (spoon full of wet food) before bed. This is not going over well at all and I need advice from those that may know.

    Do I have to keep food out all the time for them? Why can't they just eat like the dog does, twice a day with a snack?

    How often do you feed your cat(s) and what are the chances that my fat boys will get use to this? How much is enough to feed cats, I'm feeding can and dry but now days they are barfing the dry so I'm down to the wet food now.
    First question is do you really have to let them have access to the bedroom? Our house is built where the older, larger, a Maine Coon, can be confined to one end of the house were he has a litter box and water. The younger one, a female, only with us a year, we confine in a sort of mud room, between the two halves of the house. She sometimes wants to play games at bedtime, so I just close the bedroom door, if she won't go in willingly. She also has water and access to a litter box. However, their food bowls go into a cooler in the evening and come out in the morning. They're pretty adroit at leading us to the cooler in the morning. When we got married, my wife came with a Shelty and little female brindle cat. They were so attached they slept together every night. When Mollie, the Shelty, got very ill, about a year before she finally died, Natasha, the kitty would go and kill mice and bring them to Mollie, dropping them before her nose, to try to get her to eat. Mollie rallied and lived another year. 'Tasha, however, got caught out by one of the neighborhood dogs, a Chow, and I found her remains, just bones, months later, in one of our kayaks. If your house is not divided up so that you can restrict them to an area where they can't do much damage, kenneling them for the night may be the only answer. We have a friend who has several dogs and several cats and she kennels them all every night and it doesn't seem to harm them at all...

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    Member Array TIDEHSV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zonker1986 View Post
    just like people, cats get fat if they don't exercise. My cat likes to play outside as much as possible, and he is a lean mean fighting machine. When he was only an indoor cat, he was getting a bit chunky.

    Kitty Health Club membership?

    That's interesting. We have a big Maine Coon who, after being abandoned, owing to a tragedy in the neighborhood - father dying of OD and more - was feral for a while and then adopted us by stages. Finally, something outside scared him so badly (probably a coyote), he moved indoors 24/7 for five years. Then, about a year ago, we got adopted by a smaller female, obviously part Maine coon, and probably the older cat's descendant, judging by the strange black marking they share behind their back left knees. She'd migrated around 20 miles across the main part of our town, through traffic on two interstates, to get back to the mountaintop where she was born. Anyway, she was an indoor/outdoor cat from the beginning. He had probably topped out at about 20 lbs or so, but he got unhappy that she could leave, so we let him become indoor/outdoor also. Over a year, he's lost about 6 lbs or so and is just a lot more active.

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    Living "in the woods", I feed my cat once a day. Just enough to keep her around. I figure, she needs to "earn her keep" by keeping the area free of mice, chipmunks, flying squirrels, etc.

    When she starts doing the "figure 8" thing between my feet, it's feeding time.
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    I leave food out for my my two kitties. They get lots of outside time during the day so the weight issue is not a problem. As far as bugs.....that is a household problem and they need to be exterminated. Once gone they tend to stay gone. We don't have problems and we live in the woods.

    Good luck but I am afraid you are not going to win a battle to retrain cats. Thay are what the are. Now, I have a prblem with my Mainecoon who just this last week wants attention at 3 in the morning. That does not bother me so much as my wife who likes to sleep longer.
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    Your cats are middle aged they don't want change. They will probably be around another 10 years so you better get along with them or its going to be a miserable time.
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    It is great to know there are some other cat admirers on the forum. I have only one cat at present. I live in an isolated spot and the cat is allowed indoors or out as he wishes. I used to leave food out for him around the clock but it attracted lots of wild critters onto my porch so I stopped doing it. Now I leave food out during the day and put it away during the night. The cat is quite the hunter and this time of year he probably would get along fine if I didn't feed him at all. I've found cats to be intelligent and adaptable to change. They are just stubborn about it, especially if they are spoiled, which most cats are ( not mine of course ). I bet yours come around after a while if you stick with it.
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    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sister View Post
    I got two older cats around 10 & 12. They weigh 13 & 15 lbs and want to eat 24/7. I have stopped leaving out food all night because it will draw bugs and to cut back on their weight. Needless to say they are NOT happy and I'm having to squirt them with water in the morning to stop them from bothering me and waking me up.

    I want to get them on a schedule ...
    Keep the door closed, which keeps them off your head until it's time.
    Keep the schedule you set.
    Keep using the corrective sprays where appropriate, for bad behaviors.

    About all you can do. Remember, they're old and decrepit and set in their ways. Not likely to change, beyond having no other choice.
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    I have cats, too. One is diabetic at 10 Years…he is now 12. When he began the insulin, he weighed 28 pounds because he had no shortage of food. Started him on a specific diet of non-fat, feline mixture, and he lost 12 pounds…

    Get the weight off the animals (cats or dogs) to help prevent disbetes. 12 pounds might not seem like much to us, but that was 40% of his weight…the cat will adjust to the new routine…don't fall for the pitiful looks they give you…LOL !
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