Home First Aid and (CPR) kits help

Home First Aid and (CPR) kits help

This is a discussion on Home First Aid and (CPR) kits help within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; The down side of living out in the country, is medical help is all to often a ways away, Last summers dog bite to my ...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 25

Thread: Home First Aid and (CPR) kits help

  1. #1
    Distinguished Member Array 4my sons's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Out side of Richmond, VA
    Posts
    1,637

    Home First Aid and (CPR) kits help

    The down side of living out in the country, is medical help is all to often a ways away, Last summers dog bite to my wives arm, and Last Sunday's battle with our new safe, and the lower half of my left leg, needless to say, if we need help, it aint coming fast.

    My question to you guys, especially the EMT's and Dr's, what would be the recommended contents to a "Home Emergency Medical Kit", simple bandages, wraps, and tape aside, we keep those on hand anyway. Some time in the past couple of years, I remember seeing a couple of times, some "defib" (spelling) machines that were designed for general public, schools, and homes, specifically designed for the lesser or even untrained person to use. Have any of you used any of these models, and have a recommendation. I guess like a carry gun, it maybe expensive when you pay for it, but when you need it, it's priceless. The wife and I have both been first aid and Adult CPR certified, that will get redone here very soon. Any other specific training short of becoming a certified EMT that we should consider also.

    Thanks in advance

    Mike
    "fundamental principle of American law that a government and its agents are under no general duty to provide public services, such as police protection, to any individual citizen." [Warren v. District of Columbia,(D.C. Ct. of Ap., 1981)]
    If I have to explain it, you wouldn't understand


  2. #2
    Senior Moderator
    Array pgrass101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    13,631
    The portable defib kits are simple to use. In Alabama you have to get a presciption written for one or a Dr's order for a medical supplier to ship you one. I don't know how the law works in VA, some states they are an off the shelf product.
    A real man loves his wife, and places his family as the most important thing in life. Nothing has brought me more peace and content in life than simply being a good husband and father.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Array raysheen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Maine, USA
    Posts
    793
    I say have as much medical equipment around as you are comfortable and trained to use. My wife is a Dr so we have most emergency stuff here in a homemade kit. No AED yet as we are both young/healthy and we don't have a lot of older folks around the house so the need isn't really there. We will probably get one anyway in a few years when we can afford it though...just to have a well stocked med kit.

  4. #4
    VIP Member Array Cupcake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    3,164
    I haven't bought it yet, but I've heard great reviews of the book :"Where there is no doctor."

    An AED (Automatic External Defibrillator) wont hurt if anyone is old, has heart problems or there is a risk of anyone drowning. Training is a must.
    Spend few minutes learning about my journey from Zero to Athlete in this
    Then check out my blog! www.BodyByMcDonalds.com

    Cupcake - 100 pound loser, adventurer, Ironman Triathlete.

  5. #5
    VIP Member Array Superhouse 15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    3,055

    Equipment and classes

    If you don't want to go all the way through EMT, you could try a First Responder class. More than Basic 1st Aid/ CPR, but not all the way to EMT. Probably an 8 or 16 hour course. You might also want to look into this: https://www.citizencorps.gov/cert/ . Disaster medicine and mass-casualty stuff. Basic firefighting, command structure, and leadership. This is a great program. Around my area we have mostly older folks in it, and we don't use them for "combat" roles too much, but we did use them, and they did help, during the 7,000 or so hurricanes we had last year. You might even be able to organize a group of your neighbors like neighborhood watch kind of deal.
    An AED is the device you mention. An Automated External Defibrillator is used for treatment of certain kinds of sudden cardiac arrest. My agency uses the Laerdal, but is soon switching to the Zoll, if you'd like to look them up. The AED is helpful and increases survival if used very shortly after an arrest. Mostly if the arrest is due to chronic medical conditions and high risk factors. Think high blood pressure, high Cholesterol, bad lifestyle, old age, etc. Not useful in traumatic cardiac arrests except for something like electrocutions, lightning, drownings. Not much IS useful if your heart stops from a GSW or blunt trauma. They're available from Galls, a company I've dealt with many times with complete satisfaction.: http://www.galls.com/easearchresult....%5Fid%3D503185. I'd also go heavy on Oxygen and airway supplies, as much as you are trained and comfortable with using. My personal belief is that EMTs with good airway skills and basic equipment save more people than Paramedics with a box full of drugs. I have certain preferences for differen bandages and tape and such, all available from Galls. There have been some discussions here lately about IV supplies. I found a place that says it will sell supplies to you without prescription, but please note: I have never dealt with them personally, just found it on Google: http://syringesupplies.samsbiz.com/
    Iv's are easy to learn and a good way to pass the time until you get to surgery. They sell suture supplies too, but you need more than a little training to use that, I'm pretty sure. Some folks say Vet suppliers are a good source of cheap equipment and meds and stuff. If your local EMS is provided by some short staffed or underfunded agency, perhaps there is something political you could do to increase your safety. Lots of government grants around lately, and it's an easy subject to rally the community around. I'd also suggest talking to your local EMS or Fire agency and learning exactly what they provide and in what time frame. It's as easy as a trip to your local fire house probably. (PS bring cookies)

  6. #6
    Member Array vernonator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    347
    Good info from all...but what I keep trying to find and cannot is - what should a good kit contain? And I am looking for specific lists and qty's. I have recently moved to the country and would like to keep a very well stocked kit on hand. Anyone have a good list or a pointer to one?

  7. #7
    Member Array Deacon51's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    238
    I have a kit a lot like this one in my SHTF locker.

    http://www.firstaidsuppliesonline.co...y&prod=LS-Plus

  8. #8
    Distinguished Member Array 4my sons's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Out side of Richmond, VA
    Posts
    1,637
    Thanks all for the replys,

    These are the two items I'm looking at.

    First Aid Bag

    And

    Home Defib

    Hopefully some of those in the know will way in on these, the home Defib, seems to be really geared towards those w/o a lot of training. I can get one, and be trained on it, but if it's me that needs it, and the only people around at the time are freinds with no training, it's better than nothing.

    The real problem that we are going to addresse with the County, is our local station is non staffed, so when a call comes in, they have to put out the page, and see who calls in, then when the person qualified to respond calls in, they have to go to the station, pick up the equipment, then make the 10 minute drive to our house. Hopefully we can get something better in place, but if and when is the question, reguardless, it aint happening over night.
    "fundamental principle of American law that a government and its agents are under no general duty to provide public services, such as police protection, to any individual citizen." [Warren v. District of Columbia,(D.C. Ct. of Ap., 1981)]
    If I have to explain it, you wouldn't understand

  9. #9
    Senior Member Array firefighter4884's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Evansville, IN
    Posts
    686
    4 my son,

    I'm an EMT from NJ, and I've been riding on an ambulance for the better part of 6 years now. I also responded with my local fire department as a first responder for a time, so I may have some equipment that you won't need.

    You're kit didn't look to bad, but there are definitely some things that I would look at adding to it.

    I'm going to add:

    Trauma Dressing (big... usually 24"x30" (i think) gauze pad, good for severe trauma.) I'm going to have 2 of them.

    Cravat (Triangular Bandage) I'm going to add several to the kit. Your kit comes with one, but you can't splint with just one. You could do a basic sling, but not swath. I carry 5 or 6 in my bag.

    I'm also going to have more 4x4 and 5x9 gauze pads, only because I over supply.

    A BP Cuff and Stethoscope might be a good idea, if you have any experience, or want to learn to take a BP (it's not hard!)

    A set of Trauma Shears!!! not bandage scissors. Trauma shears are cheap (about $5/pair) and are excellent for cutting clothes... and exposing wound sites.

    I don't have my bag in front of me. I'll give you a detailed run down on what's in my bag a little bit later tonight. For now, I hope this helps.

    --Jim
    Firefighter / EMT - Always Ready. Ever Willing.

    ~Never do anything that you don't want to have to explain to the paramedics...~

  10. #10
    Distinguished Member Array 4my sons's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Out side of Richmond, VA
    Posts
    1,637
    Quote Originally Posted by firefighter4884 View Post
    A BP Cuff and Stethoscope might be a good idea, if you have any experience, or want to learn to take a BP (it's not hard!)

    --Jim

    We have, but I didn't think about the stethoscope, don't have the BP Cuff though, sounds like a good idea to me, Thanks for all the other additions to the kit, I'll probably do some more looking, or even make one up my self going by that kit and the added items from this thread.
    "fundamental principle of American law that a government and its agents are under no general duty to provide public services, such as police protection, to any individual citizen." [Warren v. District of Columbia,(D.C. Ct. of Ap., 1981)]
    If I have to explain it, you wouldn't understand

  11. #11
    VIP Member Array Rob72's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    OK
    Posts
    3,468
    Hmmmm. For $80, you can make a more functional aid kit for yourself. Like FF4884, says, dressings are a biggie. 2x2" for bigger-than-bandaid gouges and scrapes, 4x4"s and trauma pads for big owies. LOTS of them. Cloth tape, couple of rolls. Gel dressings, maybe 6-12, for burns. Vaseline or "occlusive" dressing, 4 or so, tho' you can use heavy Saran wrap to make a cover for a sucking chest wound. 6 rolls each of 2" and 4" gauze. Pair of good trauma shears. Nitrile gloves. Improvised or ready-made tourniquet, 1/family member. You can use paint-stir sticks for arm splints.

    You can get all of the above at CVS or WalMart pharmacy. In part, you need to look at where you live, and what you are most likely to have happen, catastrophically. Training will do more for you than all the gadgets out there.

    Ian McDevitt, on Warriortalk and TPI has had some excellent posts on combat med/trauma related aid kits.

  12. #12
    Senior Moderator
    Array MattInFla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    4,863
    Quote Originally Posted by Superhouse 15 View Post
    Iv's are easy to learn and a good way to pass the time until you get to surgery.
    An untrained individual attempting IV fluid therapy is an incredibly bad idea. Probably a criminal act to boot.

    Yes, the physical act of placing an IV is not that complicated.

    Understanding the A&P behind fluid resuscitation is, however, much more involved. Too much IV fluid in the setting of trauma is as bad or worse than none at all. Too much IV fluid in some medical settings can be fatal.

    All that aside, it is most likely practicing medicine without a license for 99.9% of the folks reading this to start an IV. It is an invasive medical procedure that requires either a medical license or the delegated authority of someone with a medical license.

    Matt
    Battle Plan (n) - a list of things that aren't going to happen if you are attacked.
    Blame it on Sixto - now that is a viable plan.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Array blueyedevil's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    615
    I agree and disagree with you Matt, IV insertion should not be taken lightly and in some situations could cause harm, especially if they fluid overload them. But with a bit of training I don't think it's beyond the layperson to learn. As for the legal issues, could go either way. If the procedure was indicated, and the person performing was trained and did not do anything grossly incompetant, especially in a situation where licenced medical help was not within resonable response time, I'm pretty sure "good samaritan" laws would cover them. I personally would not consider my first aid kit complete without a couple bags of fluid and 18,16 and 14 gauge Jelco's. But then again I was an EMT and a Navy FMF Corpsman for 6 years.

  14. #14
    Member Array Teak's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Bama
    Posts
    47
    4my son,
    As an EMT in a very rural part of the country I couldn't agree with you more when you say you are on your own. I know that I might come off sounding cynical by saying this but it is a harsh reality and something that you must come to terms with and accept when you choose to live in a rural area. Its not that the people who work in your area are incompetent, lazy or worthless it is that most of the time in Rural EMS (REMS) they are under staffed, under funded and poorly equipped to handle the situations that they are tasked to deal with.
    I do not know how your county is set up and what facilities you have at hand so I will use my area for an example. I live in what most would consider an extremely rural area with no hospital located in the county, the closest hospital ( read band aid station) is over 30 miles away with the closest true Trauma Center being 50 miles from most parts of the county ( we are fortunate that it is one of the best in the region though ), a population of around 15,000 - 18,000 with the majority living "out in the sticks", staffing two 24hr ALS (Paramedic) trucks located on each side of the county. Now where you start to run into problems responding to calls in rural areas is not being familiar with the area that you are going to, not being given good directions and on quite a few occasions not being able to get to patients, this is usually the number one reason that treatment is delayed in REMS. I will address ways to help resolve these issues later in the post. Other delays in treatment can be caused by things like the closest truck to your area being busy so another truck stationed farther away has to respond. Another common occurrence is both trucks are tied up and you have to wait for one of them to get finished, get the truck back in working order and get to you. These are all things that people that work in REMS are faced with every single shift that they work and believe me it aggravates them as much, if not more than, it does you because it creates the image that they are inept at their jobs because of something that is out of their hands.
    Another common place occurrence in rural settings is the use of volunteer organizations to substitute or supplement other primary units. Lots of times when a region can not support a paid staffed truck they put together a volunteer group that will act as first responders until the primary truck is able to get there. Volunteers as much of a help as they can be come with a good bit of drawbacks, please don’t take this the wrong way those of you that are volunteers and understand what I am saying. One of the biggest problems is everybody wants to come to the meetings at the Fire House, get the specialized tags on their trucks, wear the t-shirts and hats and do all the cool stuff. Very few however want to attend continuing education to keep their skills up to date and even fewer want to get out of their warm bed at 3AM when its freezing rain because someone ran their car off in a ditch. Now if you are a volunteer and do not fall into the above group my hats off to you! You perform a service to your community that few understand or appreciate and you do it not for money or reward but because of your will to want to help your fellow man and that makes you a very rare breed.
    The down side to all of this is because of the low call volume generated by rural areas and the extremely high cost of staffing and maintaining and Ambulance things are not likely to change. Most of the rural volunteers departments are forced to rely on hand me down equipment and donations from the community to keep things running. Also they are almost always going to operate on a Basic Life Support (BLS) level which means that they are very limited as to what they can do.
    Pierce

    "Fear is what keeps you alive but panic is what kills you" - Leo

    "At contact distances, if you can't shoot him, hit him...Nothing says 'TAP' can't be accomplished by smashing the magazine into his face." - Gomez

    TRAMPLE THE WEAK AND HURDLE THE DEAD

  15. #15
    Member Array Teak's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Bama
    Posts
    47
    Now what can you do to help ensure the safety of your family and loved ones? Well most of the answers are very simple, some apply to all EMS systems and some more to rural settings:
    - Be able to give 911 clear and simple to follow instructions to your house. Avoid using terms like “the big oak tree”, “just past where Bobby Jones lives”, “turn right at the fourth dirt road”, or one of my personal favorites “ look for the house with the porch light on”.
    - Find out where your local Fire / Ambulance station is and go to it. Starting from their parking lot write out turn by turn directions, this might seem like a pain the in butt thing to do now but when the time comes that you need them it could quite possibly be a life saver. Keep these directions written down and posted with the rest of your emergency information by the phones. This is especially helpful if you have someone, like a babysitter or out of town relative, calling that is not familiar with how to get to your house.
    - When you are asked for a call back number give the dispatcher one that you will be around to answer. If you give them your home number then run outside without the house phone it doesn’t do much good does it? It doesn’t hurt to give more than one number also. Being able to call back and talk to someone on scene can be a very valuable tool not only in finding the patient but also in the preparation to treat them.
    - If the injured person is a mile or two down a hiking or atv trail, in a muddy pasture, creek bed or anywhere that an Ambulance is going to have a difficult time getting to be thinking of ways to help get the patient out. Also let the dispatcher know that the pt is going to be had to access and extricate and exactly what the circumstances are. Again this helps the crew know what they are walking into so they can start putting together a plan of action and contacting necessary people before they arrive.
    - Keep an up to date list of any medication that you take ready to give to the Ambulance crew, do this for anybody in your house that takes medication. Also on the same list have all of your pertinent personal information, things like your name, DOB, address, weight, SSN, ANYTHING that you might be allergic to along with all of your insurance information, an emergency contact person, your hospital of choice, primary doctor and your pertinent health history (things like diabetes, cancer, hypertension or cardiac problems). This will save valuable time when they get there if you are just able to hand them that list. This is something very valuable if you live alone, or have an elderly relative that lives along or if your travel and there might not be anybody around to give this information for you.

    These are the main things that I can think of right now off of the top of my head and are the few minor things that you can do that will drastically improve your interaction with an EMS agency and the outcome from it.
    Pierce

    "Fear is what keeps you alive but panic is what kills you" - Leo

    "At contact distances, if you can't shoot him, hit him...Nothing says 'TAP' can't be accomplished by smashing the magazine into his face." - Gomez

    TRAMPLE THE WEAK AND HURDLE THE DEAD

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Comprehensive First Aid Kits?
    By BigFish in forum Related Gear & Equipment
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: November 27th, 2010, 08:04 PM
  2. SIG Conversion Kits
    By lands5 in forum General Firearm Discussion
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: April 6th, 2010, 01:32 AM
  3. Boo Boo & Trauma Kits
    By mercop in forum Related Gear & Equipment
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: October 25th, 2009, 12:53 PM
  4. Knife kits?
    By pokes02 in forum Defensive Knives & Other Weapons
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: July 3rd, 2009, 09:21 PM
  5. M4 Build Kits
    By cuban11182 in forum Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: May 11th, 2008, 02:07 PM

Search tags for this page

bodily bleed out kits

,

how to make homemade iv fluid

,

life saver plus first responder first aid kit ls-plus

,

www.firstaidandcprkits

Click on a term to search for related topics.