Bookworms? - Page 2

Bookworms?

This is a discussion on Bookworms? within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Originally Posted by Betty So what are you reading? Cloud of Sparrows by Takashi Matsuoka. I've always liked "historical" novels about Japan, at least since ...

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  1. #16
    Lead Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Betty
    So what are you reading?
    Cloud of Sparrows by Takashi Matsuoka. I've always liked "historical" novels about Japan, at least since Shogun!

    In my "to be read" pile:
    The Island Of The Day Before by Umberto Eco
    the Grail Quest triology The Archer's Tale, Heretic and Vagabond by Bernard Cornwell
    The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
    Alas, Babylon by Pat Frank
    I've read most of Eco's books and enjoyed them, and most of Cornwells. I also enjoyed The Archer's Tale, I think I may want to see the move when it comes out (unless I've already missed it), I heard they were making one.

    Some of my recent favorites have been:
    All the Amy Tan books. I've read them all. I can relate to her books - they are consistently about a Chinese mother who has a cultural gap with her American-born daughter, and the mother recounts the gripping stories of her hard life. So my mom's not Chinese, but boy... can Asian mothers be alike...
    I've read most of Dan Brown's work, found him before he became "famous". His stuff has always made me sit back and think, something I like in a book.

    When it's not fiction, I'm usually reading history, mostly in the 1755 to 1790 period of the US. I usually read a couple of books a month, down a little from the younger days.
    Rick

    EOD - Initial success or total failure


  2. #17
    Member Array ibe4glocks's Avatar
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    Bookworm

    You'll have to move Alas, Babylon by Pat Frank to the head of the line. It is one of my favorites. I reaad it in sixth grade and I lived close to SAC in NE. So Mother Russia dropping one in my back yard was always in the dark recesses of my mind. It takes place in Florida, but Omaha gets a mention.

    For the bathroom try Uncle John's 4-ply Bathroom Reader by the Bathroom Reader's Institute.

    I'm finishing my goal of reading all of James Michener's books. I read the Covenant when I was in South Africa and I just finished Alaska, so now I'll have to take a trip up there. If you like history , give them a shot.
    Courage is fear holding on a minute longer.
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  3. #18
    Senior Member Array jdsumner's Avatar
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    Wow, I wish I could tell you guys what sort of literary genius I am currently engrossed in. But, I cant.
    I did take out Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns the other day. Each time I read it, I realize how much our childhood super heros influenced us. Or at least, me. One man, no special gifts, or powers, can MAKE himself better, and make a difference. And one harsh realization "...the world only makes sense when you force it to..."

    Dan

  4. #19
    Member Array Fjolnirsson's Avatar
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    One man, no special gifts, or powers, can MAKE himself better, and make a difference.
    That's why Batman was my favorite.
    "Water can flow, or it can crash. Be like water, my friend."-Bruce Lee

    My Blog

    "Luck, often enough, will save a man if his courage does hold."

  5. #20
    Member Array Deke45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Tourist
    But speaking of books, have you ever read Hunter S. Thompson's book on the Angels?
    I like the Angels book entitled "Three Can Keep A Secret If Two Are Dead"...just makes sense!

    Kimber Ultra CDP Elite STS II

    A gun is a tool...the real weapon is between your ears!

  6. #21
    Former Member Array The Tourist's Avatar
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    Deke,

    Not to hijack this thread, but I witnessed something funny regarding 'death' and the Angels. Jokes we played of this type are referred to by bikers as "jangling the squares." Of course, that's 1960's jargon.

    I was in the Wisconsin Inn one lazy Sunday afternoon. The bartender was at the far end of the bar, schmoozing with a couple of citizens and reading the newspaper. One of our members, Tiny, walked over to them to get another Big Bud, and the bartender pointed out an article on the Angels.

    "Tiny," he began, "It says here that the Angels have over 150 acres of land that they use to bury the bodies of their enemies."

    Stone-faced, Tiny simply responded, "Boy, those Angels have a lot of class, we only have two..."

    As he walked back down to the pool table, we all surrepticiously got a peek at the citizens. Everybody had their mouths open; one citizen chugged his beer and split.

    We held it as long as we could and then burst out laughing at Tiny's comment.

    Own two acres of land? Heck, at that time most Riders had to finance an oil change.

    Edit: For those who need an explanation, this was a joke, a joke, a joke. We did stuff like that then for humor, for humor, for humor. He felt they were trying to rattle him, so he made use of black, humor, humor, humor.

  7. #22
    Member Array Deke45's Avatar
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    Tourist:

    I'm sure givin the chance, you and I could sit down over a couple brews and have some real gut busters swappin lies about the old days...no doubt!

    Kimber Ultra CDP Elite STS II

    A gun is a tool...the real weapon is between your ears!

  8. #23
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    Cloud of Sparrows by Takashi Matsuoka. I've always liked "historical" novels about Japan, at least since Shogun!
    That was an okay read. I think Autumn Bridge is the sequel to that, but I hadn't read it.
    "Americans have the will to resist because you have weapons. If you don't have a gun, freedom of speech has no power." - Yoshimi Ishikawa

  9. #24
    Member Array Lawrence Keeney's Avatar
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    The Zombie Survival Guide
    All WEB Griffin historical military novels..
    I just got the most recent John Sandford Lucas Davenport novel in paperback, I did not know He quit writing them.

    Dwight MacLemore's Tomahawk combat book

    Phil Elmore's book Demon Lord

    There is a new Richard Marcinko book coming next month..gonna get that

    Today I also bought the latest Destroyer novel, the adventures of Remo and Chuin, Masters of Sinanju.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Betty
    That was an okay read. I think Autumn Bridge is the sequel to that, but I hadn't read it.
    Autumn Bridge is the sequel. I'll probably check Amazon for it when I finish "Cloud", I'd want it in paperback, and I don't know if that is out yet.

    So far you're right, "Cloud" is a good read (I'm about half way through it), and I've got a stack of books waiting, so I have time before I need the sequel!
    Rick

    EOD - Initial success or total failure

  11. #26
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    My reading tastes change from time to time...currently in a SHTF / end of the world / science fiction direction.
    Just finished Robert Heinlein's "Number of the Beast" and S.M. Stirling's "Dies the Fire"...both good reads.
    "Alas, Babylon" is a VERY good SHTF novel.

    I can always find time for a Louis L'Amour western, too.
    "I surrounded 'em"- Alvin York

    "They're ain't many troubles that a man can't fix with seven hundred dollars and a thirty ought six"- Jeff Cooper

  12. #27
    Former Member Array The Tourist's Avatar
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    Deke,

    The problem is that all of the truly funny stuff--that being embarrassing, self effacing, stupid, petty and somewhat foolhardy--is all painfully true.

    For example, word came back to us that one member had been in an accident at the Capitol Square. A car had pulled out in front of him, and the Rider t-boned it with a rigid frame panhead.

    We feared the worst, until the biker walked into Joey's Anchor.

    He'd hit a Volkswagen Beetle, the old style, and cut the car completely in half. That's right, two separate and distinct pieces. His bike had been towed down to the Smith Brothers' cycle shop, where their, mechanic, 'Honda,' had already surveyed the damage.

    Everything looked pretty straight--barring a disassembly--but most of damage looked like a simple polish and re-chrome at Northern Plating.

    Now, how many tequilas would it take to make up a story like that. Ten? Maybe twelve? It was free entertainment. It really happened.

  13. #28
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    I've just finished "The Way To Glory", by David Drake. It's just been published, and is the fourth in his "Lt. Leary" science-fiction naval series.

    Over the past few days I've also read "Paris After The Liberation", by Antony Beevor and Artemis Cooper - excellent history; "The Korean War" and "Overlord" by Max Hastings - outstanding military history; and "Thunder Below!", by RAdm. Fluckey, describing his WW2 experiences in the submarine Barb. All outstanding books.

  14. #29
    Distinguished Member Array AutoFan's Avatar
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    Well I usually read several books a week (the stair stepper at the health club is boring, I can read by my pool in the morning, and I read VERY fast). NON-FICTION: "Freakanomics" -- an entertaining guide to analyzing statistics. I know it sounds lame, but either pick it up or read the review in the Wall Street Journal. FICTION: Let me go to the other room...a Fantasy novel called "Gardens of the Moon" by Steven Erikson, first one in a series (the second is already out). I just finished the latest by Feist in the "Silver Talon" series.

    My wife jokes that I have the largest private collection of Science Fiction & Fantasy in the country (at least I think she's joking). She won't let me buy hardcovers anymore, something about us living in a house, not a bookstore?

    "Alas Babylon" is a great book, even if it is dated.

    I also read the WSJ, the local newsrag, subscribe to US News & World Report and the Discover magazine.

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by AutoFan
    My wife jokes that I have the largest private collection of Science Fiction & Fantasy in the country (at least I think she's joking). She won't let me buy hardcovers anymore, something about us living in a house, not a bookstore?
    WOW! Do I know that feeling.

    My wife and I had to give up hardcovers years ago. It was the books or the kids, and I lost (Darn kids). Sometimes I really hate seeing a book I want and having to wait till it comes out in paperback.

    I don't think there is a room in the house without reading material.
    Rick

    EOD - Initial success or total failure

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