The War Attn: WWII Folks

This is a discussion on The War Attn: WWII Folks within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; CLICK ON THIS LINK. http://www.pbs.org/thewar/ THE WAR A Ken Burns Film Directed and Produced by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick In the spring of 1945, ...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 17

Thread: The War Attn: WWII Folks

  1. #1
    Administrator
    Array QKShooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Off Of The X
    Posts
    34,578

    The War Attn: WWII Folks

    CLICK ON THIS LINK.
    http://www.pbs.org/thewar/


    THE WAR
    A Ken Burns Film

    Directed and Produced by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick

    In the spring of 1945, as the war in Europe drew to a close, the CBS radio correspondent Eric Sevareid was troubled. He had been reporting on the fighting for four years, and had done his best to convey to his listeners back home all that he had seen and heard in Burma, France, Italy and Germany. But he was haunted by the sense that he had failed. He told his audience:

    “Only the soldier really lives the war. The journalist does not -- war happens inside a man -- and that is why, in a certain sense, you and your sons from the war will be forever strangers. If, by the miracles of art and genius, in later years two or three among them can open their hearts and the right words come, then perhaps we shall all know a little of what it was like -- and we shall know then that all the present speakers and writers hardly touched the story.”

    For the past six years we have striven to create a documentary film series about the Second World War in that spirit. Ours has been, in part, a humbling attempt to understand “the things men do in war, and the things war does to them” (as Phil Caputo so aptly noted). We chose to explore the impact of the war on the lives of people living in four American towns -- Mobile, Alabama; Sacramento, California; Waterbury, Connecticut; and Luverne, Minnesota. Over the course of the film’s nearly fifteen hours more than forty men and women opened their hearts to us about the war they knew -- and which we, their inheritors, could only imagine.

    Above all, we wanted to honor the experiences of those who lived through the greatest cataclysm in human history by providing the opportunity for them to bear witness to their own history. Our film is therefore an attempt to describe, through their eyewitness testimony, what the war was actually like for those who served on the front lines, in the places where the killing and the dying took place, and equally what it was like for their loved ones back home. We have done our best not to sentimentalize, glorify or aestheticize the war, but instead have tried simply to tell the stories of those who did the fighting -- and of their families. In so doing, we have tried to illuminate the intimate, human dimensions of a global catastrophe that took the lives of between 50 and 60 million people -- of whom more than 400,000 were Americans. Through the eyes of our witnesses, it is possible to see the universal in the particular, to understand how the whole country got caught up in the war; how the four towns and their people were permanently transformed; how those who remained at home worked and worried and grieved in the face of the struggle; and in the end, how innocent young men who had been turned into professional killers eventually learned to live in a world without war.

    Over the course of seven episodes, we spend a great deal of time in battle -- on the ground, in the air and at sea, in Europe and the Pacific -- examining in countless ways and from many perspectives what one of our witnesses, Paul Fussell, described as “the real war."

    “The rest of it,” he told us, “is just the show-biz war. The real war involves getting down there and killing people. And being killed yourself or just barely escaping it. And it gives you attitudes about life and death that are unobtainable anywhere else.”

    Throughout the series, one theme has stayed constant, one idea has continually emerged as we have gotten to know the brave men and women whose stories it has been our privilege to tell: in extraordinary times, there are no ordinary lives.

    The Second World War was fought in thousands of places, too many for any one accounting. This is the story of four American towns and how their citizens experienced that war.

    Ken Burns and Lynn Novick
    Liberty Over Tyranny Μολὼν λαβέ

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #2
    Senior Moderator
    Array pgrass101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    13,093
    Watched the first two episodes

    I really liked them. The poor guy who went to the Phillipians in 1940 is probably the most heroic survivor that I've ever heard.
    Sometimes I wonder who the old man in the mirror is....

    Lord, Grant me a good sword and no need to use it.

  4. #3
    Ex Member Array azchevy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Oceanfront Property
    Posts
    3,850
    Great link. Thanks now I need to watch it

  5. #4
    Member Array pistola's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Opossum Hollow
    Posts
    487

    Exclamation

    Quote Originally Posted by pgrass101 View Post
    Watched the first two episodes

    I really liked them. The poor guy who went to the Phillipians in 1940 is probably the most heroic survivor that I've ever heard.
    I watched the first two also. I must agree,he survived the Bataan death march, then to be shipped to Japan to be tortured more.
    U.S. Army Veteran

  6. #5
    Assistant Administrator
    Array P95Carry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    South West PA
    Posts
    25,482
    I had a quick look but didn't find any links to vid clips. Anyone?
    Chris - P95
    NRA Certified Instructor & NRA Life Member.

    "To own a gun and assume that you are armed
    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


    http://www.rkba-2a.com/ - a portal for 2A links, articles and some videos.

  7. #6
    Member Array taggart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Isle of Lucy
    Posts
    197
    I wasn't going to watch it. Our cable company's on-screen guide called it "The Necessary War" or some hogwash like that. I thought "Here we go. Let's bash Bush again." I'm not sure if that was a subtitle or something like that. But, a friend of mine suggested I watch it. She said there was a lot of footage from Luverne, MN where I (and she) used to live. So, I might just have to take a peek and push my paranoid thoughts aside for an evening. I mean, can you blame me? It's PBS!
    Taggart Snyder
    Man about town...

  8. #7
    Administrator
    Array QKShooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Off Of The X
    Posts
    34,578
    It's an amazing documentary. I am captivated by it. Part one was phenomenal. I'm a post war rug rat and was not born then.
    Liberty Over Tyranny Μολὼν λαβέ

  9. #8
    Member Array wendywc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Houston, TX - USA
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by taggart View Post
    I wasn't going to watch it. Our cable company's on-screen guide called it "The Necessary War" or some hogwash like that. I thought "Here we go. Let's bash Bush again." I'm not sure if that was a subtitle or something like that. But, a friend of mine suggested I watch it. She said there was a lot of footage from Luverne, MN where I (and she) used to live. So, I might just have to take a peek and push my paranoid thoughts aside for an evening. I mean, can you blame me? It's PBS!
    Don't blame your cable company; that's the name of one of the episodes in the 7-part series.

  10. #9
    Member Array Gun Loving Liveral's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Bennington, Oklahoma
    Posts
    127
    Remember, Ken Burns produced the documentary, THE CIVIL WAR, perhaps the greatest documentary of all time! He did a short film (2 hours, short for him) on Lewis and Clark which was very good also. He also has done documetaries on baseball and jazz which I regret I have not seen. If his WWII series is half as good as the one on the Civil War it will be fantastic.
    In Oklahoma, even we liberals like guns!

  11. #10
    Lead Moderator
    Array rstickle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Laurel, MD
    Posts
    21,367
    I'm taping it so please don't tell me how it ends!

    Actually I'm looking forward to watching it. I always like these things, especially if they contain "new" footage I might not have seen before.
    Rick

    EOD - Initial success or total failure

  12. #11
    Member Array MD_Willington's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    SE WA State
    Posts
    481
    Watched parts of it last night.. interesting...

  13. #12
    Senior Moderator
    Array pgrass101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    13,093

    Staff Sergeant Walter D. Ehlers Medal of Honor Winner

    I don't know if ya'll watched last night but they interveiwed S/Sgt Ehlers about D-Day, the loss of his brother during the invasion and his actions leading up to the breakout at St. Lo. At the end of the program during the credits it said he earned the Medal of Honor for his actions.

    Here is the Citation:

    World War II Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient

    Staff Sergeant Walter D. Ehlers, US Army 18th Infantry



    CITATION:

    Rank and organization: Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, 18th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Place and dare: Near Goville, France, 9-10 June 1944. Entered service at: Manhattan, Kans. Birth: Junction City, Kans. G.O. No.: 91, 19 December 1944. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty on 9-10 June 1944, near Goville, France. S/Sgt. Ehlers, always acting as the spearhead of the attack, repeatedly led his men against heavily defended enemy strong points exposing himself to deadly hostile fire whenever the situation required heroic and courageous leadership. Without waiting for an order, S/Sgt. Ehlers, far ahead of his men, led his squad against a strongly defended enemy strong point, personally killing 4 of an enemy patrol who attacked him en route. Then crawling forward under withering machinegun fire, he pounced upon the guncrew and put it out of action. Turning his attention to 2 mortars protected by the crossfire of 2 machineguns, S/Sgt. Ehlers led his men through this hail of bullets to kill or put to flight the enemy of the mortar section, killing 3 men himself. After mopping up the mortar positions, he again advanced on a machinegun, his progress effectively covered by his squad. When he was almost on top of the gun he leaped to his feet and, although greatly outnumbered, he knocked out the position single-handed. The next day, having advanced deep into enemy territory, the platoon of which S/Sgt. Ehlers was a member, finding itself in an untenable position as the enemy brought increased mortar, machinegun, and small arms fire to bear on it, was ordered to withdraw. S/Sgt. Ehlers, after his squad had covered the withdrawal of the remainder of the platoon, stood up and by continuous fire at the semicircle of enemy placements, diverted the bulk of the heavy hostile fire on himself, thus permitting the members of his own squad to withdraw. At this point, though wounded himself, he carried his wounded automatic rifleman to safety and then returned fearlessly over the shell-swept field to retrieve the automatic rifle which he was unable to carry previously. After having his wound treated, he refused to be evacuated, and returned to lead his squad. The intrepid leadership, indomitable courage, and fearless aggressiveness displayed by S/Sgt. Ehlers in the face of overwhelming enemy forces serve as an inspiration to others.
    Sometimes I wonder who the old man in the mirror is....

    Lord, Grant me a good sword and no need to use it.

  14. #13
    Assistant Administrator
    Array P95Carry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    South West PA
    Posts
    25,482
    Managed to catch most of last night's - but fell asleep before credits.

    Ehler's story was rivetting - and while I knew it before, just knowing the losses again on Ohama beach made me realize just what hell the guys endured. It is still hard to envisage accurately just how huge was the scale of D Day.
    Chris - P95
    NRA Certified Instructor & NRA Life Member.

    "To own a gun and assume that you are armed
    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


    http://www.rkba-2a.com/ - a portal for 2A links, articles and some videos.

  15. #14
    Senior Moderator
    Array pgrass101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    13,093
    Chris,

    Those gallant men, of Fathers and Grandfathers, who knew they would be there in combat until they were killed, incapicated or won is an inspiration to me. The dedication required to perform the things they did is amazing.

    The one man who stated that before each mission he would be so scared that he would throw up but he went on every mission anyway. I realize that I am the last generation of my family to talk to my grandfather about his experience at Guadacanal and Bouginville and my Great-Uncles time as a POW in Germany (waist gunner on a B-24 who was shot down on his third mission early in 1944) or my Grandmother working in a muntions plant.

    I realize that I must try to impress on my son the sacrifices made to defeat the Axis powers during WWII. Plus my wifes Grandfather was in the German Army on the eastern front but I don't know much about him. I only meet him 3 times and he didn't speak English and I don't speak German.

    I realize that I must tell my son about them
    Sometimes I wonder who the old man in the mirror is....

    Lord, Grant me a good sword and no need to use it.

  16. #15
    Assistant Administrator
    Array P95Carry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    South West PA
    Posts
    25,482
    The one man who stated that before each mission he would be so scared that he would throw up but he went on every mission anyway.
    Darryl - if truth be known many guys felt like that - including I seem to recall one other guy on last night's episode where he was only able to ''settle'' when the shooting started. Anticipation is probably always the worst.

    My late father was a Lt tank commander in the Brit army ...... and had some stories to tell tho like many, reluctantly. I would not be here right now if it had not been for fate leaving him injured in Belgium prior to D Day - and so he did not go. His whole section was wiped out.

    I was able fortunately in my younger years even, to identify with all the brave fighters but was often saddened (and angered) when some of my peers lightly dismissed all the sacrifices made - which was why they were able to enjoy their relaxed and peaceful lifestyle.

    My dad was (justifiably I feel) bitter about his lost 6 years ... he was 21 when war broke out and his plans to become a professional could not be fulfilled ..... as once he was again a 'civvy'' he had a family to support and so got 'a job' - which never really gave him his career satisfaction ever. He was often angered by the lack of appreciation much of the post war youth displayed.
    Chris - P95
    NRA Certified Instructor & NRA Life Member.

    "To own a gun and assume that you are armed
    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


    http://www.rkba-2a.com/ - a portal for 2A links, articles and some videos.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. One less WWII veteran
    By ppkheat in forum Bob & Terry's Place
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: March 19th, 2010, 09:15 PM
  2. WWII Vets ~ Did You Know This? ~~~> ?
    By QKShooter in forum Law Enforcement, Military & Homeland Security Discussion
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: August 28th, 2009, 12:29 PM
  3. WWII PPK as a carry gun...would you?
    By Krmnnghia in forum Defensive Carry Guns
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: April 30th, 2007, 06:27 PM