SON OF A GUN ??????? Anyone See It?

This is a discussion on SON OF A GUN ??????? Anyone See It? within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; I really WANTED to put this into the general firearm area but, I am afeared of what comments I might possibly get. This WAS on ...

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Thread: SON OF A GUN ??????? Anyone See It?

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    SON OF A GUN ??????? Anyone See It?

    I really WANTED to put this into the general firearm area but, I am afeared of what comments I might possibly get.

    This WAS on TV Today...The Show Was MYTHBUSTERS...this is a serious post.

    Did anybody see the ending of Mythbusters tonight???? OR...has this one show run in your area of the United States before?
    It was called SON OF A GUN....Anyway...Here was the myth that they were checking out & were trying to replicate.

    It was during the Civil War...supposedly a soldier was ready to fire his rifle. He was Kneeling ~ Knee up ~ Elbow on his knee as a rifle support & he was THEN SHOT with a minnie ball that passed through the tibia bone of his lower leg & then through his yes, (you guessed it) his....bag of Family Jewels.
    The bullet passed through his.........picking up his "D.N.A Material" then traveled approximately another 150 yards before striking a woman in the lower abdomen.
    She reportedly became impregnated from the residual "male material" on the bullet. She gave birth to a bouncing baby boy & he was nicknamed..."Son Of a Gun" ~
    This story was reported in the various post Civil War newspapers & has be legend ever since.
    Anyway...I absolutely could not stay home any longer & I had to go out. I missed the end of the show because they were jumping back & forth between two different myths.
    So...what happened???? Fact Or Fiction??? Keeping in mind that it only takes one of the tiny little tadpoles to do the job. Possible or Impossible? I honestly missed the ending.

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    QK - ****** - missed that prog because out shooting PPC and forgot to get Mrs to tape it.

    I'd say the possibility was ''highly unlikely'' but at my advanced time of life I have learned never to call something a ''couldn't happen'' unless proven so - thus it goes into the ''maybe'' folder.

    I too would be intrigued to know how that all shaped up - so, someone musta seen it?
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    VIP Member Array Euclidean's Avatar
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    Oh good grief... people actually believe such nonsense?

    I love the Mythbusters for their objective look at what firearms really are and are not capable of, but the Mythbusters don't need to even consider such a silly thing.

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    Well...

    I didn't see the show, but based solely on the info you have given, I'd have to put that one in the "myth" category, because:

    a. I have a hard time buying that a minie ball could pass through a leg bone, through, ah, other tissue, then continue an additional 150 yards.

    b. If it actually did carry that far, I'd guess that with medicine being what it was back then, the trauma to the woman's abdomen would prevent a successful pregnancy.

    One thing is a pretty safe bet: I think any male on this forum, if faced with fatherhood, would rather initiate it the conventional way!

    SSKC

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    OK I found It On Snopes

    This is officially a MYTH. Here is the story. It has an interesting additional twist at the end.

    Here is the Snopes Story

    Claim: During the Civil War, a woman was impregnated by sperm carried on a bullet that passed through the scrotum of a soldier and penetrated her ovaries.

    Status: False.

    Origins: Sometimes touted as the origin of the phrase "son of a gun," the apocryphal tale of "the bullet through the balls" is a well-traveled legend, often reported by such infamous urban legend vectors as "Dear Abby," as in this example from her 6 November 1982 column:
    It seems that during the Civil War (May 12, 1863, to be exact), a young Virginia farm girl was standing on her front porch while a battle was raging nearby. A stray bullet first passed through the scrotum of a young Union cavalryman, then lodged in the reproductive tract of the young woman, who thus became pregnant by a man she had not been within 100 feet of! And nine months later she gave birth to a healthy baby!
    The story, in fact, is completely false. The claim for the miraculous "bullet pregnancy" originated with an article that was printed as a joke in the journal The American Medical Weekly on 7 November 1874. Subsequent journals and books cited the article as fact without checking the original source or realizing that it was a put-on, and the story has been passed down through the years as an "actual case that appeared in a real medical journal many years ago."

    The long and tortuous history of this legend begins with an article entitled "ATTENTION GYNAECOLOGISTS! NOTES FROM THE DIARY OF A FIELD AND HOSPITAL SURGEON, C.S.A." appearing under the name of an "L.G. Capers, M.D., Vicksburg, Miss." in the 7 November 1874 issue of The American Medical Weekly. It recounts the now-familiar story of a Confederate field surgeon who dressed the wound of a soldier injured by a bullet that had entered the soldier's leg, ricocheted off the bone, and carried away his left testicle. Coincidentally, the same surgeon was then called upon a few moments later to administer aid to a young lady who had received a gunshot wound to the abdomen. Exactly 278 days later, the surgeon returned to the village and delivered a baby boy of the wounded women, although she steadfastly maintained that she was still a virgin.

    The general tone and style of the article should have indicated to the astute reader that the whole thing was a gag. Even if they didn't, at least a few more obvious clues gave away the joke: The baby was said to have been born "with something wrong about the genitals," and upon examination the surgeon discovered that the ball which had wounded the soldier and impregnated the woman was lodged in the newborn infant's scrotum! Even more implausibly, the soldier, when told of his astonishingly-achieved fatherhood, quickly wed the child's mother! For those who still didn't catch on to the article's facetiousness, a note from the editor explaining that the whole thing was a bit of "fun" (complete with a pun on the putative author's name) was printed in the same journal two weeks later.

    (Note: The details of battle given in the original article do correspond to actual events. In May of 1863, Union troops under the command of Major General James B. McPherson set out for Raymond, Mississippi, a town about fifteen miles from Jackson, the state capital. On May 12 a unit led by Major General John A. Logan ran into a Confederate brigade under the command of General John Gregg, and the battle of Raymond ensued, with Gregg eventually withdrawing his outnumbered forces from Raymond and heading down the road to Jackson.)

    Several months later, the British medical journal The Lancet reprinted (portions of) the 1874 article. Then, in 1896, George M. Gould and Walter L. Pyle cited (and quoted from) The Lancet as a footnote to a section about artificial impregnation in their book Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine. Even Gould and Pyle seem to have recognized the original article's drollery, however, as they mention that it is included "not because it bears any semblance of possibility, but as a curious example from the realms of imagination in medicine." F. Donald Napolitani, M.D., evidently didn't catch the article's whimsicality, though, as he presented all the same details as an "authenticated case report" in his 1959 article about "Two Unusual Cases of Gunshot Wounds of the Uterus" for the New York State Journal of Medicine.

    From then on, one or more of these sources has been cited as proof of an actual occurrence "carefully recorded for the annals of medicine" in everything from American Heritage magazine to "Dear Abby," with each source accepting the previous ones' references as accurate citations of a "real" medical journal article.

    The links below include the original 1874 article from The American Medical Weekly that started it all, an editor's note from a subsequent issue of the same publication explaining the whole thing as a gag, an oft misinterpreted summation from the 1896 book Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine, and a 1959 article from the New York State Journal of Medicine by a doctor who didn't quite get the joke (or do his homework).
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