What are your favorite books?

This is a discussion on What are your favorite books? within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Inspired by the Favorite Movie thread , what are your favorite books? Some of mine... Fiction: Starship Troopers - and NOT the awful, awful, awful, ...

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Thread: What are your favorite books?

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    Senior Member Array Cthulhu's Avatar
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    What are your favorite books?

    Inspired by the Favorite Movie thread, what are your favorite books?

    Some of mine...

    Fiction:
    • Starship Troopers - and NOT the awful, awful, awful, awful, AWFUL bastardization that was put on film
    • Lord of the Rings Trilogy
    • Dune
    • Dune Messiah
    • Children of Dune
    • God Emperor of Dune
    • The Repairman Jack series by F. Paul Wilson
    • Most fiction by Carl Hiaasen
    • Ender's Game


    Non-Fiction:
    • Band of Brothers
    • Beyond Band of Brothers
    • Memoirs (of W. T. Sherman)
    • The Tao of Jeet Kune Do
    • Freakonomics
    • Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman
    • The Demon-Haunted World
    • What Do You Care What Other People Think?
    • The Pleasure of Finding Things Out


    -JT

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  3. #2
    VIP Member Array JonInNY's Avatar
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    Wow, Cthulhu, what a diverse list!

    I have several all-time favorite books:

    1) Time and Again, by Jack Finney. A mystery about time travel in New York City.

    2) The Journeyer, by Gary Jennings. A fictionalized (based on fact) account of the travels of Marco Polo.

    3) Rendezvous with Rama, by Arthur C. Clarke. Sci-Fi about very interesting visitors to earth.

    4) The Hobbit (and the trilogy), by J.R.R. Tolkien.

    5) Undaunted Courage, by Stephen Ambrose. The explorations of Lewis and Clark. In my opinion, two of the greated American heroes of all time.

    I could go on and on, but I think those are my favorites.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch; Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote."
    -- Benjamin Franklin

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    Senior Member Array czman2006's Avatar
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    All time favorite is the Bible (Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth). I must admit that I am a comic book fanatic, mainly DC and Marvel. Superman Rules!
    "Let not your heart be troubled." John 14:1

    USN Retired Vietnam/Desert Shield/Desert Storm

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    Distinguished Member Array Fitch's Avatar
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    The Mona Intercept by Donald Hamilton

    is either at or near the top of my list of good fiction. It was written quite a while a go - 1980's is think. Hamilton was a strong proponent of the 2nd amendment.

    Fitch

  6. #5
    VIP Member Array Kerbouchard's Avatar
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    In no particular order...

    Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
    The Fountainhead By Ayn Rand
    Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee Brown
    The Walking Drum by Louis La'mour
    1984 by George Orwell
    Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
    The Super System By Doyle Brunson
    Ender's Game/Ender's Shadow by Orson Scott Card (As much as an author has to put themselves into their books, I still find it amazing that the same author could write the exact same story, but from two seperate view points, and have the book still turn out great.)

    And many others, but those are some of the ones that have influenced me the most.
    There are two sides to every issue: one side is right and the other is wrong, but the middle is always evil.

    http://miscmusings.townhall.com/

    Who is John Galt?

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    Senior Member Array dcb188's Avatar
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    I have a list that is pretty long, but Kerbouchard is right about all of his, especially 1984, which is one of the scariest books ever written.
    Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, a great book and so is anything by Louis L'Amour.
    One of the best non-fiction books I have ever read is put out by the Naval Institute Press called No Surrender, the story of Hiroo Onoda, the Japanese LT who did not believe WWII was over, and fought in the Phillipines for thirty more years. Nothing anyone did convinced him til his old Commanding Officer came and asked him to lay down his arms, and he finally did. Great book.
    Surrounded and outnumbered, Marine Col Lewis Puller: "Good! We finally got 'em where we want 'em!" (Korea, 1950)
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    My list would be obscenely long, so heres a few:

    Stephen Pressfield's "greek" books, Starship Troopers, Ender's game, With the Old Breed, We were one, Jarhead, Fields of Fire, Biggest Brother
    Fortes Fortuna Juvat

    Former, USMC 0311, OIF/OEF vet
    NRA Pistol/Rifle/Shotgun/Reloading Instructor, RSO, Ohio CHL Instructor

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    Senior Member Array dcb188's Avatar
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    The Modern Library | 100 Best | Novels
    I always found this link/list interesting, seeing the difference between what the public says and what publishers say.
    Surrounded and outnumbered, Marine Col Lewis Puller: "Good! We finally got 'em where we want 'em!" (Korea, 1950)
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    Right is Wrong and Wrong is Right.
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    Socrates : "Knowledge is knowing that we know nothing".

  10. #9
    Ex Member Array Ram Rod's Avatar
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    I used to read alot of fiction and science fiction like the OP. Ever since I've had internet, I don't seem to read books anymore---everything's right here and I never have to read all the way to the end to get what I'm looking for. LOL

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    VIP Member Array ExactlyMyPoint's Avatar
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    I am more of a non-fiction type of guy.

    The Bible

    How to Win Friends and Influence People - Dale Carnegie (Don't judge the success of the book based on my personality. I am a tough case)

    The Proper Care and Feeding of Husbands - Dr. Laura
    (This is THE best book on staying married. Every women should read it.)

    Heaven - Randy Alcorn
    Preparing for the Zombie Apocalypse or Rapture....whichever comes first.

  12. #11
    Senior Member Array dcb188's Avatar
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    Bible is number one, I fully agree.
    Surrounded and outnumbered, Marine Col Lewis Puller: "Good! We finally got 'em where we want 'em!" (Korea, 1950)
    __________________________________
    Right is Wrong and Wrong is Right.
    __________________________________
    Socrates : "Knowledge is knowing that we know nothing".

  13. #12
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    I have wide-ranging tastes. Mostly, non-fiction and histories grab me, but I've been known to love a number of good novels.

    A few that have interested me over the years ...


    Aztec -- by Gary Jennings. A novel, as chronicled by a series of interviews of an aging Aztec man that are recorded by priests and scribes about 40yrs following the rape of the New World by the Conquistadores. It's through the eyes of the Aztec man who has lived a full and interesting life. An amazing story. One of the finest novels I have ever read.

    Atlas Shrugged -- by Ayn Rand. A classic novel about good and evil, set in the business world of top industrialists, in which they attempt to fight the Kafka-esque elements of modern "civilization."

    Watership Down -- by Richard Adams. A story of a small band of rabbits that flees from a colony and fights to find their own way.

    Lord Of The Rings -- by J.R.R. Tolkien. Escapist fantasy in which the struggles are more real and meaningful than most books ever attempt. If you haven't read the books once, you're missing a treat.

    The Power Of One -- by Bryce Courtenay. A coming-of-age story about a young boy who learns through several teachers what it takes to be a man. Fascinating and inspiring, this is a gem of a book.

    Ishmael -- by Daniel Quinn. A novel about a teacher who is desperately trying to find a student who has the capacity to learn. The message is about defining simple rules of life and how to live, through understanding the history of the living world ... from the eyes of the animals and people being crushed by modern civilization.

    The Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire -- by Edward Gibbon. A classic history, both broad and deep. Extremely well written.

    The Road to Serfdom -- by Friedrich von Hayek. An important book for understanding how the modern world works.

    A People's History Of The United States -- by Howard Zinn. While the author, himself, has his strong leftist issues, the book is an excellent counterpart to standard texts on the subject that many folks have read. If you disbelieved the "standard" accounts and refused to accept the whole cloth of things, this is something that helps paint a somewhat different picture.

    Manufacturing Consent -- by Noam Chomsky. While I do not agree with many of his claims, he helps open the eyes to possibilities most don't choose to contemplate, in terms of the role of government, the media, the civilian population's role. A book you'll either love or hate, for numerous reasons.

    The Prize: The Epic Quest For Oil, Money & Power -- by Daniel Yergin. If you want to understand the basic mechanics of the Industrial Age, this book should be in the top five you read. A fascinating portrayal of motivated and inventive people, companies and governments who transformed energy use in the past 150 yrs. Probably worth more than any ten textbooks I have ever read, yet its fairly easy to read. The history of oil, made accessible and understandable.

    The "Camulod" series of novels (The Skystone, The Singing Sword, etc) -- by Jack Whyte. Nine novels that seek to explain and fill out the history behind the Arthurian legends, proposing a web of families that sought to withstand the dissolution of the Roman Empire near the end of the 4th Century A.D. For people who love a good adventure and dive into character-rich stories, this is a good one.

    The Seventh Scroll, River God, and Warlock -- a trilogy of novels by Wilbur Smith. It's about how a lost scroll leads to the unearthing of a fabulous ancient Egyptian treasure from the hills, and the story of how that treasure came to be. The first book follows the modern-day treasure hunt, while the other two delve into the history behind it. Stunning detail and rich in characters.

    Brothers Karamazov -- by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. A classic novel about good and evil, and the devil within. Heavy reading, and long, but well worth it. It has been some years since I have read it, but it still haunts me from time to time. A classic read.

    Shogun -- by James Clavell. A novel about a Dutch mariner who runs aground in Japan in the 16th Century, only to find himself a bartered chip in a deadly game of political "poker" between feuding warlords and Samurai warriors. A great tale about two colliding societies, as viewed from both sides.

    Surely You Must Be Joking, Mr. Feynman -- by Richard Feynman. A self-deprecating look at a wonderful life, from the eyes of one of the more fascinating characters of this past century. He was a man who grew up in the 1930's, was involved in the Manhattan Project in the second world war, taught at Princeton and CalTech. It's mostly about a curious mind, showing what made him tick. Hilarious. A good reminder about staying open minded, and about staying young at heart.

    For The Sake Of All Living Things -- by John Del Vecchio. A novel set in Cambodia during the southeast Asian wars of the 1960's, it tells the story of a family that is torn apart. Viewed from their eyes from different vantage points (town leader, businesswoman, soldier & spy, bureaucrat invader), it's a heart-breaking story of hope and despair when facing the trials of civil war.

    Why We Get Sick: The New Science Of Darwinian Medicine -- by Randolph Nesse. An interesting alternative view that's gaining steam, that many of our modern "cures," medicines and feel-good steps are simply getting in the way of our own body's natural defenses. In this way, the author suggests we might well be doing more harm than good, in the long run.

    1984 -- by George Orwell. Ditto on the sentiments of others. A great and scary classic, portending bad things to come if we aren't careful. Sure as sunshine, many such things are coming to pass.
    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
    Thoughts: Justifiable self defense (A.O.J.).
    Explain: How does disarming victims reduce the number of victims?
    Reason over Force: The Gun is Civilization (Marko Kloos).
    NRA, GOA, OFF, ACLDN.

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    Senior Member Array dcb188's Avatar
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    Another good one is Evan Hunter's The Blackboard Jungle. From which the movie was made, but the book is much better.
    Surrounded and outnumbered, Marine Col Lewis Puller: "Good! We finally got 'em where we want 'em!" (Korea, 1950)
    __________________________________
    Right is Wrong and Wrong is Right.
    __________________________________
    Socrates : "Knowledge is knowing that we know nothing".

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    Distinguished Member Array morintp's Avatar
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    I read mostly fiction, and some of my favorites are:

    The Hobbit and LoTR trilogy
    Sword of Truth Series - Kerbouchard, you might like this if you get into fantasy. The message is similar to Atlas Shrugged. But you don't see that until the 3rd or 4th book.
    Wheel of Time Series
    Dune - just the first 2 or 3
    Anything written by Tom Clancy

    And of course, PC Magazine, I'm a subscriber. </geek>

  16. #15
    Senior Member Array dcb188's Avatar
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    MORINTP: could my thread replies about Boston PD Initiative now be considered a book?
    Surrounded and outnumbered, Marine Col Lewis Puller: "Good! We finally got 'em where we want 'em!" (Korea, 1950)
    __________________________________
    Right is Wrong and Wrong is Right.
    __________________________________
    Socrates : "Knowledge is knowing that we know nothing".

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