Kayaking 101 tips or forum/site for newbie?

Kayaking 101 tips or forum/site for newbie?

This is a discussion on Kayaking 101 tips or forum/site for newbie? within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Bass pro had kayaks on sale and I impulse bought a pair of Old Town Loon 100s (I wanted a pair of Old Town "Rush", ...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16
  1. #1
    VIP Member Array Cupcake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    3,164

    Kayaking 101 tips or forum/site for newbie?

    Bass pro had kayaks on sale and I impulse bought a pair of Old Town Loon 100s (I wanted a pair of Old Town "Rush", but they were out). Felt very unstable and I tipped withing a minute of leaving the beach. At least that was the last time I tipped today. After the swim, I just hung out in a foot or 2 of water for a while, learning how to tip it and not tip it. I then paddled for about an hour, keeping near the shore. I feel a little better about the kayak and think it might be good for my core strength to have to really pay attention to keep my balance. I'm still wondering If I should return the unused one and wait for a "rush," which I understand to be more stable. Just don't know how much the wife/kids will like having to fight to stay up.

    Any advice/recommended links to pages or a good forum?
    Spend few minutes learning about my journey from Zero to Athlete in this mini documentary!
    Then check out my blog! www.BodyByMcDonalds.com

    Cupcake - 100 pound loser, adventurer, Ironman Triathlete.


  2. #2
    Senior Member Array joleary223's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    1,057
    It all depends on what kind of water you are going to kayak on. I liked the looks of the loon better because of the storage but there is no white water in south Georgia, I paddle slow rivers and ocean bays.
    You might hold on to the new one for a while, try to rent something for the family to try and see what they think.
    Personally this would be my choice Dirigo 106 Recycled Kayak - Old Town Canoes and Kayaks but that's my style. You will still have to practice getting in and out without getting wet. Check for a local shop that specializes in paddling they will be able to give you tips or even classes.
    CRIME..... LAW DEFINES, POLICE ENFORCE, CITIZENS PREVENT!

    FOUR BOXES KEEP US FREE: [1] SOAP [2] BALLOT [3] JURY [4] AMMO!

  3. #3
    Moderator
    Array RETSUPT99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    44,785
    The wife and I have two Loons, 13'8"...very stable...they take us through the gator mating season quite safely...

    Stay armed...when kayaking in April/May...stay safe!
    The last Blood Moon Tetrad for this millennium starts in April 2014 and ends in September 2015...according to NASA.

    ***********************************
    Certified Glock Armorer
    NRA Life Member[/B]

  4. #4
    Lead Moderator
    Array rocky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    16,026
    Canoeing and Kayaking Info - Paddling.Net Lots of great folks on this site, I frequent it occasionally. If you are a big guy (220 lb +) , the 100 may not be big enough to suit you. Finally , if you get up in N. MI and want to paddle a river give me a call.
    "In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock." Thomas Jefferson


    Nemo Me Impune Lacesset

  5. #5
    Senior Member Array Rob P.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    In the sticks
    Posts
    631
    The more you paddle, the more stable you will be in any particular kayak. It's about learning balance in an unstable environment.

    You should practice until you can recover from an upset 100% of the time. Not 99%, 100% of the time. That means getting back in the boat after you fall out of it without totally swamping it.

    Don't EVER paddle without your PFD either and until you have more experience, don't paddle alone or in bad weather. Sunscreen is your friend. So is a hat and sunglasses.

  6. #6
    Member Array Pete10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Dublin, Ohio
    Posts
    37
    It does get better quickly. If you are in relatively flat water, you will have to work to tip. Keep your shoulders inside the boat and you should be fine. When you start leaning outside the gunwale, you will tip.

    Have fun and stay safe. Try fishing out of your kayak when you are more comfortable. Lots of fun.

  7. #7
    VIP Member Array Cupcake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    3,164
    Thanks for the tips and link. My loons are 10'. They are actually called the Loon "Angler" because it has rod holders and an anchor cleat, but the salesgirl said they were basically a 100. No gator water or oceans for me, I have a policy about being in waters where something can eat me.

    I'll be in lakes and rivers, both paddling and some fishing. Don't think I'll be in any rougher rivers, but who knows where the sport will take me. I am definitely + of 220, I was hoping the sport would help me get back to a reasonable weight. The sticker on the boats said 300lb capacity, but I understand that my CG might be a bit higher than ideal. I am glad I had my PFD on, even though I tipped in chest deep water, I couldn't have known that. Unfortunately, I don't have any kayaking buddies. I'll just have to stick near shore until I'm better and hope I don't hit my head? I might try to catch a fish tomorrow and see if it pulls me right over (in just a couple feet of still water).

    Rocky, don't be surprised if I look you up later this summer. You're in Northern Lower, right?
    Spend few minutes learning about my journey from Zero to Athlete in this mini documentary!
    Then check out my blog! www.BodyByMcDonalds.com

    Cupcake - 100 pound loser, adventurer, Ironman Triathlete.

  8. #8
    Lead Moderator
    Array rocky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    16,026
    Yep, been kayaking since about 06 or so. Here is a link to many paddling shots of me and a few buddies.northman111 pictures and videos on Webshots
    "In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock." Thomas Jefferson


    Nemo Me Impune Lacesset

  9. #9
    Senior Member Array joleary223's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    1,057
    Man rocky you guys are tough. I like to paddle in the winter but winter is different down here.
    As for the Gators Cupcake, you just have to be careful in mating season other than that I just give them a poke in the butt and they move along. I give them a wide berth if they're bigger than the boat though.
    CRIME..... LAW DEFINES, POLICE ENFORCE, CITIZENS PREVENT!

    FOUR BOXES KEEP US FREE: [1] SOAP [2] BALLOT [3] JURY [4] AMMO!

  10. #10
    Member Array Pete10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Dublin, Ohio
    Posts
    37
    Quote Originally Posted by Cupcake View Post
    Thanks for the tips and link. My loons are 10'. They are actually called the Loon "Angler" because it has rod holders and an anchor cleat, but the salesgirl said they were basically a 100. No gator water or oceans for me, I have a policy about being in waters where something can eat me.

    I'll be in lakes and rivers, both paddling and some fishing. Don't think I'll be in any rougher rivers, but who knows where the sport will take me. I am definitely + of 220, I was hoping the sport would help me get back to a reasonable weight. The sticker on the boats said 300lb capacity, but I understand that my CG might be a bit higher than ideal. I am glad I had my PFD on, even though I tipped in chest deep water, I couldn't have known that. Unfortunately, I don't have any kayaking buddies. I'll just have to stick near shore until I'm better and hope I don't hit my head? I might try to catch a fish tomorrow and see if it pulls me right over (in just a couple feet of still water).

    Rocky, don't be surprised if I look you up later this summer. You're in Northern Lower, right?
    One tip, pick up one of the mockingbird portable fish finders. I have one that is meant to go on your rod. It has a floating sensor that you can tie on to your kayak to float beside you. It will let you know how deep the water is at any given time. Piece of mind, and better fishing patterns!

  11. #11
    Senior Member Array DrLewall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Drakes Creek, AR
    Posts
    958
    If you weigh a bit more than 220, then it seems that the 10' kayak is a little small for you, dispite the 300lb cap..must have a narrow beam if it's that unstable. The Loon 138 would be a good boat for you. I have 11 kayaks and it is always fun to call up friends and take them all out for a float

    "Brains before Bullets"

  12. #12
    VIP Member Array Cupcake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    3,164
    Well, I guess it's just me. I took both boats to the lake today with my 11y/o. I planned on seeing if he could stay upright before I put the new one in the water. If he couldn't, I was gonna trade it for a different one.

    No need. I stood next to him in the water and he couldn't tip it when he tried. Not unless he pulled up with the paddle while leaning. So, both boats went in and we had a nice little paddle. Even I stayed dry. Just a matter of learning to balance. I'm definitely pushing the limits with this boat, though. I'm guessing 300lbs is when it actually starts to sink, rather than 300lb rating plus a margin of safety. I don't have to lean far to dip the cockpit in, then it's all over. I'm gonna keep it though, and fix the problem, which seems to be me, not the boat. Perhaps I'll bump into some of you at paddling.net. Thanks again, guys.
    Spend few minutes learning about my journey from Zero to Athlete in this mini documentary!
    Then check out my blog! www.BodyByMcDonalds.com

    Cupcake - 100 pound loser, adventurer, Ironman Triathlete.

  13. #13
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    27,042
    I paddled whitewater for about 10yrs, up to ~1998 or so. Had a Perception Corsica and believed it worked very well given the mixed-mode paddling I chose to do. Mostly, it was whitewater in low Class IV down to meandering Class II, with occasional flatwater on lagoons and small lakes. Anyway ...

    It's hard to describe, though fairly clear once you see it actually done. So, my apologies in advance if this doesn't seem clear.

    Two points I found invaluable:
    • Keep your arms fairly straight and "anchored" while your torso rotates. It's the rotation that gives you your power and leverage against the water, not flexing your arms (which can tire out fairly quickly).
    • Learn to operate your lower body independently of your upper body/arms. The arms/torso will power your stroke, provide the leverage against the water for balance. The lower body will roll with the undulations of the water, independently of whatever the torso/arms are doing during the stroke.


    For me, the difference between being tippy versus being stable was subtle. It centered on one thing: being loose and flexible in my midsection, allowing me to "separate" the lower body from the paddle stroke so that rolling with the water's waves and undulations could occur on its own, independently of the force you're maintaining against the water during the stroke or brace.

    As a simple gauge of the torso's flexibility, I would know that the day would be good (from a balance standpoint) if I could hold the paddle in my hands and easily twist my entire torso/arms around such that I was facing nearly 180* to the tail of the boat. If I was not that flexible that day, I would almost always be tippy and get wet frequently.

    The point is, flexibility and looseness is key, here. It's what allows you to separate the lower body from the upper, to allow them to operate independently.

    Think of dangling from a chin-up bar, in which your torso/arms are pretty much anchoring you against that bar, and it's your lower body's ability to dangle and whip around that gives you all your motion. In such a motion, your arms are perfectly straight, your torso is hanging from the arms, and you can move your lower body and legs about that anchor point.

    Forcing your paddle against the water is a bit like that. When you do a firm stroke with your torso rotating and your lower body loosely rolling around the point of leverage, you actually end up being both more stable and more powerful all at the same time. I strongly believe that comes from the subtle ability to separate lower from upper, to allow them to do their independent jobs.

    For some tips, check: BRT Insights, among which are some good discussions (with images/videos) describing this "separation" of the lower body's motion from the upper.

    I would recommend getting at least a one-day kayaking tutorial with an experienced boater. You'll learn stroke fundamentals, how to rotate your body/boat around that point of leverage you're making with the paddle on the water, and simple techniques that will keep you healthier and happier on the water. In the end, it comes to this: watching someone actually do it properly is worth 1000 words.

    Be sure to focus on flexibility and rotation. As well, don't forget the shoulders, which are a weak link in the paddling stroke. Do what you can to strengthen your shoulder, as it's going to take a bit of a beating, with a lot of paddling.
    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
    Thoughts: Justifiable self defense (A.O.J.).
    Explain: How does disarming victims reduce the number of victims?
    Reason over Force: The Gun is Civilization (Marko Kloos).
    NRA, SAF, GOA, OFF, ACLDN.

  14. #14
    Administrator
    Array SIXTO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    19,903
    Rocky, great pics! Its funny this thread came up, I just returned from a short fishing trip on Erie, the Mrs. and myself were talking about getting a couple of kayaks to take advantage of being surrounded by rivers where we live.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  15. #15
    Administrator
    Array SIXTO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    19,903
    Nobody else?
    "Just blame Sixto"

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Hello I'm a newbie to this site
    By Pyrochad in forum New Members Introduce Yourself
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: February 28th, 2011, 06:48 AM
  2. Forum Usage: Tips and Tricks
    By JD in forum Reference & "How To" Forum
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: June 23rd, 2008, 03:51 PM
  3. Hi Everybody! Newbie to this wonderful site!
    By Baby Hulk in forum New Members Introduce Yourself
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: March 14th, 2006, 11:53 AM
  4. Newbie to this forum, newbie to firearms
    By ibex in forum New Members Introduce Yourself
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: October 6th, 2005, 09:09 PM

Search tags for this page

kayaking 101 tips

,
newbie kayak info
,
old town loon 138 kayak for sale
,
river kayaking 101 tips
Click on a term to search for related topics.

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!

» DefensiveCarry Sponsors