Neat! WWII .45acp Bullet Key Chain Mailer

Neat! WWII .45acp Bullet Key Chain Mailer

This is a discussion on Neat! WWII .45acp Bullet Key Chain Mailer within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Neat....I guess WWII Troops could drop these DWAT .45 acp Bullets into the ol' mailbag & send them home to the kiddies. Any WWII Guys ...

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Thread: Neat! WWII .45acp Bullet Key Chain Mailer

  1. #1
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    Neat! WWII .45acp Bullet Key Chain Mailer

    Neat....I guess WWII Troops could drop these DWAT .45 acp Bullets into the ol' mailbag & send them home to the kiddies. Any WWII Guys remember these? Just Curious. Thanks.


  2. #2
    Member Array d2thomas's Avatar
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    now that would be sweet to get in the mail! ...... I wonder how much one of those goes for today?
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    Daresay now - if shape detectable and then screened - be a major USPS bomb scare!!
    Chris - P95
    NRA Certified Instructor & NRA Life Member.

    "To own a gun and assume that you are armed
    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


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    Senior Member Array dpesec's Avatar
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    Did I hear of Joe Fosse being detained at Phoenix airport because he had one of those as a key chain?
    Dave

    “The highest obligation and privilege of citizenship is that of bearing arms”. General George Patton—US Army

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  5. #5
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    I used to have my NRA silver bullet key chain dealie with me - and at Dulles International had all sorts of probs with the screeners. I mean sheesh - solid cast shape - big hole in bottom for ring - as inert as inert gets.

    But NO - had to go separate in a baggie
    Chris - P95
    NRA Certified Instructor & NRA Life Member.

    "To own a gun and assume that you are armed
    is like owning a piano and assuming that you are a musician!."


    http://www.rkba-2a.com/ - a portal for 2A links, articles and some videos.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Array dpesec's Avatar
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    well Chris, we pay these people minimun wage and expect them to think? Heck we have high priced politicians who can't even do that.
    Dave

    “The highest obligation and privilege of citizenship is that of bearing arms”. General George Patton—US Army

    Vis et Veneratio

    "So this is how democracy dies: to thunderous applause." Actress Natalie Portman as Padme in Star Wars Revenge of the Sith

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by dpesec
    Did I hear of Joe Fosse being detained at Phoenix airport because he had one of those as a key chain?
    I thought I haerd he had his CMH taken at an airport for some reason, by a TSA idiot. But there have been a couple reports of people having NRA bullet keychains taken.
    Rick

    EOD - Initial success or total failure

  8. #8
    Senior Member Array dpesec's Avatar
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    Nothing the TSA does surprises me. I bet the TSA person wouldn't know what the CMH is. I've seen the robbon once and was in awe.
    Dave

    “The highest obligation and privilege of citizenship is that of bearing arms”. General George Patton—US Army

    Vis et Veneratio

    "So this is how democracy dies: to thunderous applause." Actress Natalie Portman as Padme in Star Wars Revenge of the Sith

  9. #9
    Distinguished Member Array LenS's Avatar
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    Gen. Joe Foss & CMH/TSA Debacle

    One of the reasons that I refuse to fly anymore unless it is a dire emergency and I can't imagine what would be that dire!

    From: http://www.snopes.com/military/medal.htm

    "They just kept passing it around there were eight or nine or ten of them who handled it before it was over," he said.
    "They had found it in my pocket at the airport, and they thought it was suspicious. It's shaped like a star, and they were looking at the metal edges of it, like it was a weapon. I asked for it back, but they kept handing it to each other and inspecting it. I was told to move to a separate area.

    "I told them — just turn it over. The engraving on the back explains everything. But they thought they must have something potentially dangerous here.

    "I told them exactly what it was — I said, 'That's my Congressional Medal of Honor.´"

    The man relating that story was retired Gen. Joe Foss, 86. His experience last month in Arizona at the international airport in Phoenix — may be the ultimate symbol of the out-of-kilter times we are going through. We are so afraid of terrorists in our midst that what happened to Foss is not only believable, but perhaps even inevitable:

    The Congressional Medal of Honor will be taken from its recipient because it looks vaguely ominous.

    I spoke with Foss because I wanted to hear it from him directly. He told me that he holds no animosity about the incident — "I'm just as interested in defeating the terrorists as anyone is, I promise you that" and that he is mostly sad that no one knew what the Medal of Honor was.

    Foss was awarded the medal by President Franklin D. Roosevelt during World War II after shooting down 26 enemy planes as a Marine fighter pilot in solo combat in the Pacific. He grew up in South Dakota — after the war he would become governor of that state — and took flying lessons as a young man, then went to war.

    He lives in Scottsdale, Ariz., and when he travels he is patted down in airports instead of going through the metal detectors, because of a heart pacemaker. At the airport in Phoenix, he said, he was being searched manually and he put his jacket through the X-ray machine. A couple of things caught the attention of the screeners — rightly so.

    Foss has a key chain made out of a dummy bullet, with a hole drilled through it to make it evident it is harmless; he also carries a small knife/file with the Medal of Honor Society's insignia on it. The screeners took both of them from Foss — traveling during these nervous days with items that look like bullets, or with even a small knife, will, and should, invite scrutiny. Even if you're 86. Even if you're a war hero.

    That's not what frustrated him. The screeners, he said, allowed him to mail the key chain and the little knife back to his home from the airport. But for 45 minutes, he estimated, he was passed from person to person, made to remove his boots and tie and belt and hat three different times, and prevented from boarding his flight (he was eventually allowed on) because the security personnel, he said, had misgivings about his Medal of Honor.

    (America West Airlines, in whose terminal in Phoenix the incident allegedly took place, said through a spokeswoman shortly after the misunderstanding that the airline's objective is to ensure safety and security for all passengers and employees.)

    "I want you to know," Foss told me, "that I don't go around wearing my Medal of Honor, or carrying it with me. The only reason I had it with me on this flight was that I was supposed to give a speech to a class at the United States Military Academy at West Point, and I thought the medal was something the cadets might be interested in seeing."

    I asked him what he remembered about being presented the Congressional Medal of Honor. "I was right fresh out of combat when I was called to the White House," he said. "FDR was behind his desk, and he pinned the medal on my uniform. He said it was for actions above and beyond the call of duty.

    "I was nervous, being in the presence of the president. I think I may have been more nervous there than I was in combat. My wife and mother were with me — it was quite a day. I think President Roosevelt called me 'young feller.'"

    After the White House ceremony, Foss had his photograph taken with the medal — the nation's highest military honor for valor in action — on his uniform. That photo was the full front cover of Life magazine, the issue of June 7, 1943; the cover caption was: "Captain Foss, U.S.M.C. America's No. 1 Ace."

    And now, almost 60 years later, the Medal of Honor was being handed from one skeptical security screener to another in the Phoenix airport, while Foss, at 86, took his boots and belt off as ordered.

    "I wasn't upset for me," he said. "I was upset for the Medal of Honor, that they just didn't know what it even was. It represents all of the guys who lost their lives — the guys who never came back. Everyone who put their lives on the line for their country. You're supposed to know what the Medal of Honor is."

    ---------------------------------------------

    Origins: On 11 January 2002,
    Joseph J. Foss of Scottsdale, Arizona — a major in the USMC during World War II, a colonel in the USAF during the Korean War, and later a brigadier general with the South Dakota Air National Guard — was attempting to board an America West flight bound for Arlington, Virginia, when airport security held him for 45 minutes while they debated what to do with a variety of suspect items he had about his person. This 86-year-old former governor of South Dakota was on his way to attend a National Rifle Association meeting and to speak to cadets at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, and he carried with him his Medal of Honor, as well as a Medal of Honor commemorative nail file and a dummy bullet which had been made into a key fob.

    Each of these items was regarded as a potential security risk by airport personnel: the bullet for being a bullet, the nail file for being a nail file (metal nail files are now banned on flights in the USA), and the Medal of Honor for being a suspicious five-pointed metal object that might have been a weapon (similar to the Japanese throwing discs known hira shuriken).

    After being repeatedly searched, Foss was allowed to board the plane with his Medal of Honor, but he had to mail the bullet and nail file home to himself. Foss' experience prompted the piece quoted above, which is the text of a Bob Greene article from the 24 February 2002 Chicago Tribune.

    Several columnists have since used this incident as the centerpiece of newspaper articles about the issues surrounding heightened air travel standards since September 11 because it highlights the problems inherent to new airport security measures. Where does a reasonable standard of protection leave off and lunacy begin? Granted, if bullets are on the banned list then passengers shouldn't attempt to bring them onboard, but should bullets which have been drilled and turned into key charms — ornamental objects which clearly pose no threat to anyone — be treated as if they were "real" bullets? And should a Medal of Honor — the country's highest award for bravery — even fleetingly be considered a possible threat to the safety of others?

    We shouldn't fault airport security officers for not recognizing a Medal of Honor on sight; not many people get to see one in their lives. But a closer examination by security personnel would have shown them what it was, and at that point in the proceedings they fell down on the job. Rather than treating an obviously cooperative passenger courteously and allowing him to explain what the suspect item was, they shuffled the general back and forth and required him to remove his boots, belt, hat, and tie — several times each. The delay they subjected him to almost caused him to miss his flight. That is no way to treat any 86-year-old man, let alone a war hero and former governor.

    Had the situation been handled professionally, the general would have cleared the security checkpoint in all of five minutes, with most of that taken up by the manual search his pacemaker necessitated. Yes, his nail file and key-ring charm would have been taken from him because both these items are on the list of things one must not bring onto a plane. But the Medal of Honor should have been quickly vetted and returned to its owner, and its owner should have been treated respectfully throughout.

    Then again, if this were a perfect world, nobody would have let me into it.

  10. #10
    VIP Member Array CLASS3NH's Avatar
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    "DEWAT"???? who said that magic word?? <drooling>

  11. #11
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    LenS

    Thanks For Posting That Story.

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    You're getting the forum all wet.:poke:
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    Thanks for posting those reports about the TSA nimrods in Phoenix, Len S....even if my blood pressure is shot for the rest of the day!
    "I surrounded 'em"- Alvin York

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