Moms, kids find officer's loaded gun in South Austin park - Page 2

Moms, kids find officer's loaded gun in South Austin park

This is a discussion on Moms, kids find officer's loaded gun in South Austin park within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; OK, not to bash, demean, insult, whatever. Honestly this is more of a rant with a question. The agency spokesperson told us he's devastated. I ...

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 37
  1. #16
    Senior Member Array Holdcard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Phoenix, Az.
    Posts
    531
    OK, not to bash, demean, insult, whatever. Honestly this is more of a rant with a question.

    The agency spokesperson told us he's devastated. I believe that the officer probably is upset on several levels. Some innocent person could have been hurt or killed. The pistol could have been stolen and used in robberies, etc. His job or advancement may now be in jeopardy.

    Letís set aside how the pistol was lost and how the officer feels for a moment.

    My issue is with the double standard between government agencies and civilians.

    Since this individual is a member of the "brotherhood" he is given a pat on the back and his firearm returned. The officer gets sympathy from the press (to a degree) and agency spokesperson.

    If the same thing happened to me, under the same circumstances, at the same time of day, in the exact location, Iíd be in real trouble. I doubt my firearm would be returned so quickly, and Iím really wondering what the agency spokesperson would be saying. I already know what the press would be saying.

    Iím not asking for special treatment because Iím a civilian, and in most cases I donít think officers should be given special treatment because of their job (in this scenario specifically). This is a scenario that could have happened to anyone.

    (Itís a given that there are times that will not fall in this category and officers will require different levels of liability).

    If it happened to a highly trained 11 year veteran officer, it could happen to anyone. So what justifies the difference in the way the event is viewed and ultimately the way justice is served?


    Alright, rant off, soapbox stowed till next time. Let me reiterate, Iím not bashing LEOís, my issue and questions are with the way these things are handled.

    Please be respectful and donít get this thread closed down, Iíd really like to get some input from others. Am I the only one that feels this way?

    Thanks for letting me rant,

    Holdcard
    If You Want To POPULATE Heaven
    You Have To PLUNDER Hell!!

    4th Man Ministries


  2. #17
    Member Array tamworth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wadsworth, Ohio
    Posts
    145
    apd3@ci.austin.tx.us

    Help me show the dept. that this needs to be taken more seriously. Email the Austin Texas Police Department with your concerns. I've asked them how they would react to this scenario if this were a civilian's loaded gun, and why they were so forgiving. No reply yet. Keep in mind, do be polite!

  3. #18
    Senior Member Array Moga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Roswell, GA
    Posts
    738
    It was a thigh rig.

    Some LE types at THR said it's not difficult to imagine how the officer failed to notice that his gun was missing from his thigh rig when you have the many accessories that officers have to carry weighing down on your belt.

    As I said there, I fail to see the correlation. How can you not be aware of two pounds of gun on your thigh? Then again, it may be that my perspective is based on the experiences with my personal rig. When I wear it, most of the stabilizing support for the weight of the gun comes from the thigh straps. The belt strap really keeps the top of the gun snug against my leg more than anything else. So if the gun is missing, I will notice that it no longer feels like I have a boulder strapped to my leg.

    In case anyone is wondering, I use a thigh rig only for long car drives up to New England when I visit family.
    2nd Amendment: because personal violence never makes an appointment.
    Evil resides in the heart of the individual, not in inanimate objects.
    Proud Member of GeorgiaCarry.Org

  4. #19
    Senior Member Array Holdcard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Phoenix, Az.
    Posts
    531
    Quote Originally Posted by Moga View Post
    It was a thigh rig.

    Some LE types at THR said it's not difficult to imagine how the officer failed to notice that his gun was missing from his thigh rig when you have the many accessories that officers have to carry weighing down on your belt.

    As I said there, I fail to see the correlation. How can you not be aware of two pounds of gun on your thigh? Then again, it may be that my perspective is based on the experiences with my personal rig. When I wear it, most of the stabilizing support for the weight of the gun comes from the thigh straps. The belt strap really keeps the top of the gun snug against my leg more than anything else. So if the gun is missing, I will notice that it no longer feels like I have a boulder strapped to my leg.
    I can see them not noticing depending on what the office was doing at the time. With all the gadgets worn by officers and all the attachments available for some thigh rigs it wouldn't seem impossible at all.

    Your perspective may be biased because of your own rig. You said you only use it for long drives, but think about it, if you wore it every day and had other weight on it you'd get pretty used to it. I don't know about others, but I'm so used to my holster and gun that many times I don't notice it's there until I think about it or physically check for it.


    Sixto's theory about the officer putting the gun down during an exercise also makes sense too. If the gun was set aside, the officer may have felt weight on their thigh and not noticed right away. A mistake for not double checking, but an understandable one.


    Holdcard
    If You Want To POPULATE Heaven
    You Have To PLUNDER Hell!!

    4th Man Ministries

  5. #20
    Administrator
    Array SIXTO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    19,903
    Yes, if you wear a thigh rig all day everyday, its very easy to miss the weight of the gun, especially if your mind is occupied with other things. If it was in fact a thigh rig, it supports my #1 theory even more. He definitely wanted to get the gun out of the way, but I suppose the dog could have easily knocked it loose easy enough.

    How do we know if it is a thigh rig? Did someone over at THR have inside info?
    "Just blame Sixto"

  6. #21
    Member Array imatt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    311
    Quote Originally Posted by Eagleks View Post
    Now, imagine if he had come up on a robbery and went to take out his gun ?
    Big WHOOOOOPS !!!
    He would have had to wait for the police like the rest of us that can't carry in a bank.

  7. #22
    Distinguished Member Array Reborn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Rowlett, Texas
    Posts
    1,739
    Bad cop bad cop.....
    Psalms 144:1
    Blessed be the Lord my strength, which teacheth my hands to war, and my fingers to fight.
    Senior Instructor for Tactical and Defensive of Texas
    http://www.tac-def-tx.com/
    CHL INSTRUCTOR
    Retired LEO
    NRA member
    TCHA member

  8. #23
    Member Array anthonydr2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    ohio
    Posts
    44
    Anyone ever find out what the heck he was doing at the park around 5am anyway? Seems like an odd time, and losing/leaving a gun like that is really a bad mark for him and the department. Embarrassment to all is as bad as getting caught with ones pants down...

  9. #24
    Administrator
    Array SIXTO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    19,903
    Quote Originally Posted by anthonydr2 View Post
    Anyone ever find out what the heck he was doing at the park around 5am anyway? Seems like an odd time, and losing/leaving a gun like that is really a bad mark for him and the department. Embarrassment to all is as bad as getting caught with ones pants down...
    Umm, yeah, it states this in the OP;

    Quote Originally Posted by paramedic70002 View Post
    Austin police Lt. Donald Baker said supervisors are reviewing how officer Daniel Eveleth's Glock handgun might have fallen from his holster while he was training a police dog about 5 a.m. Monday at the Circle C Ranch Metropolitan Park on Slaughter Creek.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  10. #25
    Senior Member Array Moga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Roswell, GA
    Posts
    738
    Quote Originally Posted by Holdcard View Post
    Your perspective may be biased because of your own rig.
    Yes, I openly acknowledge that this may be the case. Since I don't wear this rig as frequently as a LE officer may, I have no basis for disputing whether a person may grow desensitized to its presence over repeated and prolonged use of this type of holster. I suppose that it is plausible.

    Quote Originally Posted by SIXTO
    How do we know if it is a thigh rig? Did someone over at THR have inside info?
    Austin police reviewing holsters after gun found in park
    Officers who work with dogs ordered to stop using holsters.
    By Tony Plohetski

    AMERICAN-STATESMAN STAFF


    Thursday, July 10, 2008

    Austin police are reviewing the type of holsters dozens of officers carry and have already suspended their use in the department's canine unit after officials said an officer's gun slipped out and was later found in a Southwest Austin park teeming with children.

    Assistant Police Chief Al Eells said Wednesday that a preliminary investigation shows that officer Daniel Eveleth, who was sitting on a playground slide, lost his loaded gun when a police dog lurched toward him at Circle C Ranch Metropolitan Park on Slaughter Creek early Monday.

    Eells and other department officials said Eveleth was wearing a special holster in which a gun rests between an officer's knee and hip and that the dog's paw might have knocked a leather strap covering the weapon out of place.

    "Certainly we believe there may be an equipment issue here," Eells said.

    Eells said the investigation will include why Eveleth did not know for several hours that his gun was missing. A group of mothers and about a dozen children found the weapon on the slide about 8:45 a.m. and called police, who returned it to Eveleth at his home.

    Assistant Police Chief Sam Holt, who is in charge of the department this week while Chief Art Acevedo is attending a conference, also said Wednesday that officials are reviewing why top department leaders weren't told about what happened until a day later, when the Austin American-Statesman began inquiring about the incident.

    It is the second time in recent weeks that top city officials weren't immediately notified of a high-profile incident. City Manager Marc Ott has said he didn't learn about last month's fire at the Texas Governor's Mansion until the next day. About 100 Austin firefighters battled the blaze, which nearly destroyed the empty building.

    Eells said Eveleth was nearing the end of his eight-hour shift about 5:15 a.m. Monday when he took the dog to the park. He said the dog had been patrolling with the officer in his car and that Eveleth wanted to give it time to exercise.

    He said that after several minutes, Eveleth loaded the dog into the car, went home and immediately fell asleep.

    Eells said officers who responded to a 911 call from the park thought the gun looked similar to the type of weapon officers carry and asked department officials to check its serial number against those in a database.

    He said Eveleth was "quite frankly shocked" when they returned his gun.

    "He's very upset about it," Eells said. "He has expressed that. This is the type of situation that strikes fear in every officer's heart."

    Officials said they were trying to determine Wednesday how many officers wear the "tactical thigh holsters" and will review whether they are appropriate for their assignments. They said officers in specialized units, including the SWAT team and bomb squad, often wear special bullet-proof vests that make wearing regular holsters that go around the waist uncomfortable.

    They said seven officers who are assigned dogs have been ordered to immediately stop wearing the thigh holsters.

    During a news conference, Eells, Holt and Assistant City Manager Bert Lumbreras each thanked parents at the park for keeping children away from the gun. They especially expressed gratitude to Danielle Pieranunzi, who called 911.

    Thank goodness a neighborhood tough, or a curious child, didn't find the weapon instead of an adult, law abiding citizen.

    2nd Amendment: because personal violence never makes an appointment.
    Evil resides in the heart of the individual, not in inanimate objects.
    Proud Member of GeorgiaCarry.Org

  11. #26
    Administrator
    Array SIXTO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    19,903
    Quote Originally Posted by Moga View Post
    Assistant Police Chief Al Eells said Wednesday that a preliminary investigation shows that officer Daniel Eveleth, who was sitting on a playground slide, lost his loaded gun when a police dog lurched toward him at Circle C Ranch Metropolitan Park on Slaughter Creek early Monday.

    Eells and other department officials said Eveleth was wearing a special holster in which a gun rests between an officer's knee and hip and that the dog's paw might have knocked a leather strap covering the weapon out of place.

    "Certainly we believe there may be an equipment issue here," Eells said.
    Well that explains a lot of things, thanks!
    "Just blame Sixto"

  12. #27
    Senior Member Array Moga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Roswell, GA
    Posts
    738
    Now that I'm thinking about it more critically, I wonder if physical/mental exhaustion played a part.

    1) He was in a park at 0515h with the k9 unit. BORING!

    2) He fell directly into sleep as soon as he arrived at home

    Perhaps pulling a double shift to better take care of his family? It's not like he's mister money bags on an cop's pay. perhaps he became so exhausted by the long work day that he failed to notice his weapon was missing until he cleared his head with some R&R. As a person who graduated University recently as an adult while working full time, I can relate to what prolonged sleep deprivation does to your attention span.

    In any event, I'm sure this will be the last time the good officer misplaces his side arm.
    2nd Amendment: because personal violence never makes an appointment.
    Evil resides in the heart of the individual, not in inanimate objects.
    Proud Member of GeorgiaCarry.Org

  13. #28
    VIP Member Array SIGguy229's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Kommie-fornia-stan
    Posts
    7,078
    Probably wanted to go somewhere open, without many people around...or out before it got too hot. Doesn't sound unusual to me.
    Magazine <> clip - know the difference

    martyr is a fancy name for crappy fighter
    You have never lived until you have almost died. For those that have fought for it, life has a special flavor the protected will never know

  14. #29
    Member Array tamworth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wadsworth, Ohio
    Posts
    145
    well at least now we know it was the HOLSTER. God forbid we announce to the public that a police officer made a mistake... people might start taking responsibility for their own protection if they didn't blindly trust the police... Yeah, I know, he was shocked, and he's sorry, but nowhere in any articles here do I see anything even as insignificant as a smack on the wrist. no, it was an "Equipment Issue". This reminds me of a certain "Wardrobe Malfunction..." Why can't we take responsibility for our actions anymore?!

    I digress, what would be happening now if this were a citizen's handgun?!!! they wouldn't accept an excuse like this. The holster, and equipment issue? no, they should have been using a more safe holster. this would pan out through the media as proof that gun owners probably shouldn't be carrying, that maybe that decision on the 2nd amendment wasn't right, that maybe some more regulations need to be put into place... and I very highly doubt that the gun owner would be forgiven so swiftly. They might be thinking of regulating holsters the be locked shut at all times so the gun doesn't fall out...

    Sorry, I'm a little steamed about this. I've read of police officers getting fired or suspended for silly things before, such as goofing off while on duty, greatly outweighed by this incident. And I'm not just out to see him punished for my pleasure. I'm not looking for the equation to be balanced like 'The Punisher' here, I'm just baffled by how they're treating this like a non-issue.

  15. #30
    Administrator
    Array SIXTO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    19,903
    Quote Originally Posted by tamworth View Post
    well at least now we know it was the HOLSTER. God forbid we announce to the public that a police officer made a mistake... people might start taking responsibility for their own protection if they didn't blindly trust the police... Yeah, I know, he was shocked, and he's sorry, but nowhere in any articles here do I see anything even as insignificant as a smack on the wrist. no, it was an "Equipment Issue". This reminds me of a certain "Wardrobe Malfunction..." Why can't we take responsibility for our actions anymore?!

    I digress, what would be happening now if this were a citizen's handgun?!!! they wouldn't accept an excuse like this. The holster, and equipment issue? no, they should have been using a more safe holster. this would pan out through the media as proof that gun owners probably shouldn't be carrying, that maybe that decision on the 2nd amendment wasn't right, that maybe some more regulations need to be put into place... and I very highly doubt that the gun owner would be forgiven so swiftly. They might be thinking of regulating holsters the be locked shut at all times so the gun doesn't fall out...

    Sorry, I'm a little steamed about this. I've read of police officers getting fired or suspended for silly things before, such as goofing off while on duty, greatly outweighed by this incident. And I'm not just out to see him punished for my pleasure. I'm not looking for the equation to be balanced like 'The Punisher' here, I'm just baffled by how they're treating this like a non-issue.
    here is why its different tamworth;

    The officer is assigned equipment by the department for the job. The officer likely has little say in the equipment he is issued, a lot of departments, especially larger ones, have bean counters sitting at desks that decide what an officer has equipment wise for his particular assignment. With guns and holsters, officers almost always have no say.

    So, if the gun did in fact get knocked loose while wearing a holster and gun combo that he is required to be wearing, and he is performing duties as a police officer for said city, how can the individual officer be held 100% responsible? Is he to a certain degree? Absolutely, he should have checked his equipment before he vacated the area.

    If it was Joe Civilian out there, he chose his equipment, he chose his activity for the day and he was in the park on is own accord.

    Having done the exact same things hundreds of times, I can say with out a doubt that it is entirely possible for a gun to get knocked loose from a thigh rig while K9 training. I even pointed that out before that was known to be the case here. It is also completely plausible that the officer didn't notice the weight of the pistol was gone. I wear a full size pistol every working day, sometimes it is in a thigh rig, sometimes in a traditional LEO holster... its easy to miss when you have a 15#+ utility belt on all day.

    Should he have checked and noticed? Absolutley. Will he be punished? I'm willing to bet he will, but as I explained things, I don't think it warrants losing his job, rank or anything else for that matter. The best thing that came out of this was that the department is now reviewing equipment for the future.
    "Just blame Sixto"

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Kids Find a Loaded NAA Mini Revolver, and Believe that it is a Toy
    By LanceORYGUN in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: February 6th, 2011, 01:18 PM
  2. City can't find it's park (to define where OC is legal)
    By paramedic70002 in forum The Second Amendment & Gun Legislation Discussion
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: August 2nd, 2010, 04:56 AM
  3. 2 charged with stabbing South Austin Walmart employee
    By Reborn in forum In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: November 19th, 2009, 09:32 PM
  4. 4 Men Arrested in Killing of Moms, Kids--Indianapolis (merged)
    By falcon1 in forum In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: January 20th, 2008, 08:40 PM
  5. CC's South Park Mod's :)
    By P95Carry in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: December 31st, 2006, 05:08 AM

Search tags for this page

concealed carry instruction austin
,
kids find gun park austin
,
loaded gun found in park
,
origin of name tantaksinanukij
,
tantaksinanukij name
,

tantaksinanukij name origin

,
what kind of name is tantaksinanukij
,
wut tantaksinanukij.
,
wut tantaksinanukjij named origin
,

wuthipong tantaksinanukij

,
wuthipong tantaksinanukij name
Click on a term to search for related topics.

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!

» DefensiveCarry Sponsors