Beware: Gun Confiscation

This is a discussion on Beware: Gun Confiscation within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; At 21, if my dad took my 30+ guns in this manner, I'd give him an ultimatum: give them back or go to jail. "Dad, ...

Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 94

Thread: Beware: Gun Confiscation

  1. #46
    Distinguished Member Array Agave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    West Tennessee
    Posts
    1,464
    At 21, if my dad took my 30+ guns in this manner, I'd give him an ultimatum: give them back or go to jail. "Dad, I love you, but you don't really have a choice. If we want to make an arrangement to store part of them, that is fine, but I will know the location and have access to them."

    I seriously doubt that would ever be this case, especially since he and I are truly communistic about guns.

    Slimz, has he mentioned your drinking in the past? Does he seem concerned about alcohol use? Did you ask him why he took the guns?
    The preceding post may contain sarcasm; it's just better that way. However, it is still intended with construction and with the Love of my L-rd Y'shua.

    NRA Certified Pistol Instructor, Tennessee Certified Instructor

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #47
    Senior Moderator
    Array MattInFla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    4,857
    Quote Originally Posted by Hopyard View Post
    Is there gun registration in OHIO???? Are rifles in Ohio registered?

    What about handguns?

    Where I live there is no gun registration and so under these same circumstances there is no particular record of ownership.
    Right. If one of your guns turns up at a crime scene tomorrow, do you think that the ATF cannot trace it from factory to distributor to retailer to purchaser?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hopyard View Post
    If you are serious with this idea that the kid should turn the dad over, I would suggest that the kid go and talk to a private attorney first for additional advice. Because, I really doubt that the apparent letter of the law applies in this situation or will be applied in thituation. The more likely result will be that the kid will be viewed by the police in a very very negative way.
    I didn't advocate one way or the other making the police report. Ideally, the father would recognize the terrible position he has placed his son in, and seek a more reasonable resolution to his concerns.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hopyard View Post
    And one possible outcome of the kid following your advice might just be that dad gets charged with something, but the kid gets charged with something much worse--as we don't know what is going on in that house and in the parent's mind. SO rather than take a rash decision, an attorney should at least be consulted.
    You're making a serious assumption there, and implying that the OP is a criminal, without any proof whatsoever. I don't think you are in a position to draw that conclusion, and were I in your shoes I'd apologize to the OP for assuming he's a criminal.

    Talk about a rash decision.

    Matt
    Battle Plan (n) - a list of things that aren't going to happen if you are attacked.
    Blame it on Sixto - now that is a viable plan.

  4. #48
    VIP Member
    Array Hopyard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Disappeared
    Posts
    11,573

    Don't encourage destruction of the family/? for sixto

    Quote Originally Posted by MattLarson View Post
    You're making a serious assumption there, and implying that the OP is a criminal, without any proof whatsoever. I don't think you are in a position to draw that conclusion, and were I in your shoes I'd apologize to the OP for assuming he's a criminal.

    Talk about a rash decision.

    Matt
    The assumption I am making is that the police are going to look very carefully at this young man. They are going to be more than curious why he had 9 guns, and they will- possibly based on something the dad says or knows- make a case. We have seen young people charged with plots for little more than possession of BB guns. They might decide to seize his computer. Who knows where this could escalate.

    Why in the world is everyone giving advice that will destroy this family when a little calm reflection and cooperation can solve about all of the problem.

    Paymeister got it right. The kid and the dad should go talk to a neutral third party such as a grandparent, uncle, pastor, psychologist, and work this thing out.

    THe assumption that the guns will turn up being used in a crime is far fetched given the scenario and the situation.

    I'm impressed by the OP's statement that he is an A student. I believe that. Therefore, I think he has the intellect to find a solution to this situation without escalating it.

    Absolutely nothing good can come from doing what some here have proposed. Someone will end up in jail; maybe two someones, and the family will be destroyed. (That by the way isn't a good display of family values.)

    There are better ways to deal with this. And if need be, this young man can and perhaps should seek some legal guidance if he is worried about the statute which some have cited.

    I think that statute is a non-issue, and I would love to hear from Sixto as I think he would have some solid insight into what the law truly requires here, and how the cops would view this situation.

    Still, unless dad is some sort of goof who is utterly irresponsible, this thing needs to be cooled.

    (And I doubt the dad is in fact irresponsible. As this young man is an A student, maybe dad raised him right. It appears so from some of what the OP wrote. So, there is likely at least some poor judgment on both sides. You don't want that in the hands of the cops. Pity the poor mother if both end up in the slammer.)

  5. #49
    bae
    bae is offline
    Member Array bae's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    San Juan Islands
    Posts
    257
    The "kid" is an adult. Perhaps it is time for him to move out, and live like one.

  6. #50
    VIP Member Array edr9x23super's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,108
    This is a simple situation, every child goes through this in their lives; Your father is telling you that it is his house, and his rules and he controls everything and everyone in it. I had this same issue with my dad 25 years ago when he took a pistol that I carried and sold it at the local pawn shop "because I shouldn't be carrying something like that around". he conveniently forgot that I worked in the oil fields of South Texas and was on the road alone a lot in those days.

    To solve the problem, I simply moved out on my own. Yes, it was hard and it took me an extra year to graduate from school, but I managed and had my freedom from his "rules". So the answer to your question is how much do you value your principles and your need to protect yourself, as well as your willingness to exercise your rights? If you are willing to move out on your own, then so be it. Move out and demand your father return your property. If he has gotten rid of it, like my father did, then you know where you stand with mom and dad. It was 4 years before I spoke to my dad after that, and I have not let him or any of my other family members forget it.

    Ever since he did that, i have made him an NRA member every year since then. If any of you wonder why I have mentioned in some of my posts why I make all of my liberal family members NRA members every Christmas, now you know the story behind the story.........
    "Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect everyone who approaches that jewel. Unfortunately, nothing will preserve it but downright force. Whenever you give up that force, you are inevitably ruined". - Patrick Henry

  7. #51
    Member Array bones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    380
    Be responsible.
    Move out.
    Request the immediate return of all your property.
    If not immediately returned, report the guns as stolen/missing.
    You need to both act as adults.
    "There is no such thing as too much ammo. Unless you're swimming!"

  8. #52
    VIP Member Array automatic slim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    The western edge of The Confederacy
    Posts
    2,198
    As a tenent paying rent, you have the rights anyone renting an apartment has. Likewise if a stranger was renting a room from your parents they would have rights.
    First of all, a landlord cannot enter the tenents domicile without permission. You have every right to keep your room locked.
    A landlord certainly may not tamper with or take a tenents property.
    Your dad could be charged with criminal trespass and grand larceny. By the way, the person now in possession of your guns could be charged with conspiracy, accomplice before the fact to grand larceny and felony possession of stolen property. I'd call the police and tell your father to call a lawyer.
    "First gallant South Carolina nobly made the stand."
    Edge of Darkness

  9. #53
    VIP Member
    Array Hopyard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Disappeared
    Posts
    11,573

    Ridiculous

    Quote Originally Posted by automatic slim View Post
    As a tenent paying rent, you have the rights anyone renting an apartment has. Likewise if a stranger was renting a room from your parents they would have rights.
    First of all, a landlord cannot enter the tenents domicile without permission. You have every right to keep your room locked.
    A landlord certainly may not tamper with or take a tenents property.
    Your dad could be charged with criminal trespass and grand larceny. By the way, the person now in possession of your guns could be charged with conspiracy, accomplice before the fact to grand larceny and felony possession of stolen property. I'd call the police and tell your father to call a lawyer.
    There was an agreement that the dad had the combo to the room.

    All of you, stop this nonsense that the kid should move out.

    He needs to find a solution that both he and his dad can live with.

    Talking about making this into a big dang legal deal, or insisting that the OP grow up and moving out, is just silly; and dangerous to the family's welfare.

    You all on that side of the issue are encouraging a family calamity.

    Honestly, to the guy who said he didn't talk to his dad for 4 years over a similar issue, was that really wise?

    I have not gone back to early posts to check whether or not the kid is actually paying rent. My initial recollection was no, as he is a student living at home. But in any case, don't twist a family arrangement into a commercial venture. They aren't the same thing.

    This is a kid living in his dad's home. Something happened that caused the dad to be concerned about the guns and the kids behavior or safety. Who give a whatever about the legalisms. These two have to find a way to get along. Whatever concerned the dad needs to be resolved.

    I urge the OP in the strongest way possible, preserve your relationship with your parents. If it is necessary to seek outside help to do so, do it. If it is necessary to give in, do it. Down the road you will be glad you did.

    P.S. I'm an old guy who raised a kid who is now a decade older than the OP. If you haven't raised a kid, or you have the kind of temperament where you have in the past been in constant conflict with your parents, at least stop and think about the potential damage your poor advice is going to cause.

    This isn't about gun rights. It is about a son and a dad learning to get along, and a dad trying to protect his son. It isn't for the cops. It is for a pastor or a psychologist or a close relative both trust, to sort it out.

    To the OP; SON, seriously, don't do anything you are going to regret for the rest of your life. Think carefully before you act.

  10. #54
    Distinguished Member Array randytulsa2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    1,548
    Move.

    Then if they don't appear, report them as stolen - - which they were.
    "...bad decisions that turn out well often make heroes."


    Gary D. Mitchell, A Sniper's Journey: The Truth About the Man and the Rifle, P. 103, NAL Caliber books, 2006, 1st Ed.

  11. #55
    B52
    B52 is offline
    Senior Member Array B52's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    684
    22 and still living home, I moved out at 18. It was tough at first, but I survived. I am now 32, married, and have three kids. I also got my education (BA) on Uncle Sam’s dime. Move out, it's time to become a man. My father and my relationship with him have grown tremendously since the big move.

  12. #56
    Senior Member Array MR D's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    South Central PA
    Posts
    864
    Wow!

    OP needs to report the guns missing...

    Dad is in violation of Ohio Landlord Tenant laws, Dad has had at least one loaded firearm transported from the home (Probably in violation of State law) - unless he is leo or CHL holder there is no way he could legally transport a loaded handgun in a motor vehicle in Ohio, if any of the long guns were loaded he definitely violated law in transporting...

    OP needs to have a serious chat with Dad - Ohio law is not 'friendly' to people who violate gun laws in ignorance...

    had a similar situation with my son - came home while still a student - all but one of his collection found it's way to my safe...

    house rules do have a place, but once rent changes hands the rules change...

  13. #57
    Distinguished Member Array SixBravo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Prescott, AZ
    Posts
    1,692
    Quote Originally Posted by Paymeister View Post
    THAT'S the key statement of the whole thread: your willingness to play by his rules when under his roof. Bravo!
    Agreed!! Well-said.

    Along those same lines, try to find some middle ground. You want them back, but you're willing to wait it out. I would suggest showing him the code that requires reporting of stolen/missing firearms. Make it clear that you are not even willing to consider getting the police involved, but that they are in-fact missing according to the letter of the law. Then draw him up a statement saying the he acknowledges that the guns (loaded) have been removed from proper storage and that he is assuming any and all responsibility for what happens as a direct result of their displacement. Then ask him to sign it.

    What good is that? Nothing, I would imagine when it comes to legality. I don't even know if it would/could be used in court for whatever reason. BUT it will force your father to consider the consequences of his actions. Suppose your father's storage-person lets it slip to someone that they are storing a bunch of guns and the wrong person gets a hold of that information. Unlikely but still something for him to consider.

    I like the idea of taking your dad out for a beer or two and discussing the issue at hand. Explain all of what you have told us and go from there. Prove the maturity to him and proceed like an adult. If he still doesn't see your point - then you tried. At this point, you might consider what I suggested.
    The Gunsite Blog
    ITFT / Quick Kill Review
    "It is enough to note, as we have observed, that the American people have considered the handgun to be the quintessential self-defense weapon." - Justice Scalia, SCOTUS - DC v Heller - 26 JUN 2008

  14. #58
    VIP Member
    Array ppkheat's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    4,073
    Hopyard your wisdom is showing through.

    I think everyone will admit we don't know 100% of the story.....we haven't heard Dad's side though many are already condeming and convicting him without hearing his side of the story.
    Turn the election's in 2014 to a "2A Revolution". It will serve as a 1994 refresher not to "infringe" on our Second Amendment. We know who they are now.........SEND 'EM HOME. Our success in this will be proportional to how hard we work to make it happen.

  15. #59
    Senior Moderator
    Array MattInFla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    4,857
    Quote Originally Posted by Hopyard View Post
    This is a kid living in his dad's home. Something happened that caused the dad to be concerned about the guns and the kids behavior or safety. Who give a whatever about the legalisms. These two have to find a way to get along. Whatever concerned the dad needs to be resolved.
    Again, you assume that there was a valid reason for this action, even though you correctly say we only have half the story.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hopyard View Post
    I urge the OP in the strongest way possible, preserve your relationship with your parents. If it is necessary to seek outside help to do so, do it. If it is necessary to give in, do it. Down the road you will be glad you did.
    Do you also counsel dad to preserve the relationship? If so, would you perhaps agree that his unilateral decision to take and hide the son's property was not showing the son any respect as a person?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hopyard View Post
    P.S. I'm an old guy who raised a kid who is now a decade older than the OP. If you haven't raised a kid, or you have the kind of temperament where you have in the past been in constant conflict with your parents, at least stop and think about the potential damage your poor advice is going to cause.

    This isn't about gun rights. It is about a son and a dad learning to get along, and a dad trying to protect his son. It isn't for the cops. It is for a pastor or a psychologist or a close relative both trust, to sort it out.
    Right, but it is also about following the law. The guns have been removed from the son's possession and placed God knows where by an individual who is not trained to handle them safely. The owner of the guns has a duty under the law to report them missing.

    The father's actions here - acting unilaterally rather than sitting down man to man and discussing his concerns - have placed his son in the position where he must choose to either knowingly break the law himself or report the taking of the guns to the police.

    That's not a position one should place a loved one in.

    It seems likely to me that Dad doesn't know what position he has placed his son in - and that his son should tell his father what the implications of his choice are.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hopyard View Post
    To the OP; SON, seriously, don't do anything you are going to regret for the rest of your life. Think carefully before you act.
    Indeed. Perhaps if the father knows what the consequences of this action could be for the son, he'll do likewise and not do anything he or his son will regret, either.

    Matt
    Battle Plan (n) - a list of things that aren't going to happen if you are attacked.
    Blame it on Sixto - now that is a viable plan.

  16. #60
    VIP Member
    Array Hopyard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Disappeared
    Posts
    11,573
    This business that the guns have been stolen is a non-starter.

    Think about the whole picture. This young man has been living in the home all his life, he has no doubt been a dependent on his dad's income taxes which implies that dad has provided more than 50% of the kid's support.

    This means the money the kid had available to make the gun purchases with was the dad's money-- or at least largely the dad's money and encouraging the dissolution of the family.

    And clearly, dad was generous enough that the kid somehow had substantial money to invest in those guns. You can't make a case for the word "stolen" under these circumstances. It won't fly.

    You can't make a case that dad didn't have an ownership interest here. No one in their right mind is going to call that stealing, and if it went before a jury, which it never would, you will never find 12 people who will see this as the type of "missing or stolen" referred to in the statute.

    All of this advice to report it stolen is beyond belief. You guys aren't thinking of the consequences. One wrong word from the dad and this kid will be picked up and hauled off to a mental hospital (whether he needs it or not). As someone noted earlier, all dad has to say is that he was fearful that the kid would harm himself or someone in the house, deliberately or accidentally.

    Again, instead of urging rash action that will destroy the family, urge an approach which brings about a reconciliation.

    And to the folks who want this kid to move out, yes, many do move out at an earlier age. Often they are forced out because parent's can't abide the behavior. Other times they leave for military careers at a young age. But, vast numbers of people do live a different way. They send their kids to college, support them into young adulthood, let them live at home out of love until they finish school and find a decent job. Apparently, this latter approach is what has been taken in this household, and the kid isn't yet ready financially to move out.

    So, nothing good, absolutely nothing good whatsoever, can possibly come from advising this young man in the way some here have.

    All of the evidence here is that the dad loves his son, is acting for his best interest, and you all should be ashamed for wanting to throw stones at the dad.

Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Gun Confiscation
    By TomEgun in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 110
    Last Post: December 25th, 2010, 05:08 AM
  2. Gun Confiscation
    By WVConcealed in forum General Firearm Discussion
    Replies: 95
    Last Post: March 1st, 2009, 02:01 AM
  3. Confiscation
    By wjh2657 in forum Concealed Carry Issues & Discussions
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: September 17th, 2008, 02:53 PM
  4. Gun confiscation
    By Pro2A in forum Law Enforcement, Military & Homeland Security Discussion
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: September 30th, 2007, 10:50 PM
  5. San Francisco gun ban and confiscation
    By S.O. Interceptor in forum The Second Amendment & Gun Legislation Discussion
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: January 7th, 2005, 11:07 PM