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pardoned felon becomes police officer

This is a discussion on pardoned felon becomes police officer within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; I voted yes, under certain circumstances. Our justice system states that once a crime has been commited, and that person has served his/her time, and ...

View Poll Results: Should felons be allowed to becom LEO after pardon?

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  • Never

    33 37.08%
  • Yes - they've been forgiven

    20 22.47%
  • Yes - only in certain circumstances

    36 40.45%
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Thread: pardoned felon becomes police officer

  1. #16
    Member Array carver's Avatar
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    I voted yes, under certain circumstances. Our justice system states that once a crime has been commited, and that person has served his/her time, and has completed a peroid of probation, that his/her debt to society has been paid. I personally know several men who have commited felony crimes, usually, posession of drugs, that have paid for their mistakes, and are still paying 30 years later. That just isn't right. Once you've paid for your crime, all rights should be restored. You paid!
    Y'all be safe now, ya hear!

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  2. #17
    Senior Member Array PaulJ's Avatar
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    I say "Yes", but then again, not all partsons are created equal.

    A "full pardon" as I see it is usually used if a miscarriage of justice has taken place, and the person should not have been convicted in the first place. The number of cases is very small.
    I never considered a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosophy, as cause for withdrawing from a friend. (Thomas Jefferson)

  3. #18
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    Certainly if they were incarcerated and then released for a crime they did not commit.
    For instance if a person was charged with a rape and then at some point later on DNA evidence proved that it could not have been that individual and wrongly convicted.



    I guess also in some other circumstances.
    Say and for instance - a 19 year old was convicted of a felony & that felony was selling bootlegged music CDs on Ebay.
    And then the kid went into the military...honorable discharge...had no other criminal record...got married...had two kids...kept his nose squeaky clean...and then wanted to become a LEO when he was in his 30s.

    Would we really want that non-violent "felony" stuck onto his forehead his entire life?

    So I would say Common Sense should be the judge.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by RIA45 View Post
    On firearms purchase forms it says if you have received a pardon, answer no.
    Your right on the AFT form 4473, I stand corrected. However if the persons criminal record has not been expunged, a background check should show a conviction and pardon, and unless the person has had all rights restored, they would still be prohibited from owning a firearm. The pardon does not automatically restore all rights, it just forgives the crime the person was convicted of.

  5. #20
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    Expungment

    Picking up on Archer51's point of expungment, what is the real value of expungment in the era of internet background checks? The companies appear to be under no obligation to remove data once they collect it or if so they don't seem to move very quickly at all. I recently heard a story about this on the radio and several people who had received expungments were still haunted by the information the private companies had for sale and wouldn't remove from their data bases.

    It seems that in todays "information society" there is no wiping the slate clean. Unless I am mistaken the old saying "don't commit the crime if you can't do the time." has taken on a whole new meaning.




    Searn

  6. #21
    VIP Member Array rottkeeper's Avatar
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    C; Yes but under certain circumstances for mostly reasons already stated above.
    For as the lightning comes from the east and flashes to the west, so also will the coming of the son of man be. Mathew 24:27

    NRA Member

  7. #22
    tjm
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    I say yes to a pardon, no to a commuted sentence (which I figure is probably in agreement with the policies).

    When the laws/courts/judges are incapable of doing the right thing, we need the ability of the governor or president to grant a pardon. What would you all be saying if Harold Fish got a pardon?

  8. #23
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    It is generally so unusual for a governor to issue a pardon that you can be almost certain special circumstances happened. It might be that there was a false conviction and the governor chose to issue a pardon instead of allowing things to drag on through court processes.

    I have no problem with a pardoned felon retaining their rights. I would actually like to see much broader use of the pardon powers at all levels--Federal and State.

  9. #24
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    QKShooter - I thought you knew - Common Sense is dead!

    I voted B - a pardon is a pardon. I think if a person gets pardoned and they become an LEO and end up being a bad apple after all, then they should just get charged and sent to jail like any normal law breaking LEO would.

    I bet a governor would feel pretty stupid if he/she pardoned someone that went on to commit more crimes. I bet they are pretty careful to only try to pardon people that actually deserve it in most cases - makes good political sense for them.

    Just my two cents.

    Austin

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by aus71383 View Post
    QKShooter - I thought you knew - Common Sense is dead!

    I voted B - a pardon is a pardon. I think if a person gets pardoned and they become an LEO and end up being a bad apple after all, then they should just get charged and sent to jail like any normal law breaking LEO would.

    I bet a governor would feel pretty stupid if he/she pardoned someone that went on to commit more crimes. I bet they are pretty careful to only try to pardon people that actually deserve it in most cases - makes good political sense for them.

    Just my two cents.

    Austin

    This discussion isn't about Presidential or Governor pardons. I should have been more clear. In Georgia, the Board of Pardons and Parole has the authority to grant pardons. The Governor never sees it.

  11. #26
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    QKShooter - I thought you knew - Common Sense is dead!

    Whoops! I forgot! You are correct. Common sense seems to have been hanged by the neck until dead even at the so called highest levels of society.

  12. #27
    Senior Member Array mulle46's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by celticredneck View Post
    Correct me if I am wrong, but isn't the only way to undo a wrongful conviction to be pardoned? In other words, doesn't someone who was wrongfully convicted of, say murder, get a pardon instead of just being released. If this is true, then I see no problem with that person having all of their rights restored including the right to be hired as an LEO.
    If it comes out that someone was wrongfully convicted, a judge could vacate his or her conviction and it would be like it never happened.
    You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, "I have lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along." . . . You must do the thing you think you cannot do. Eleanor Roosevelt

  13. #28
    VIP Member Array aus71383's Avatar
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    RIA45 - so these pardons are more like get out of jail free cards - its like granting parole to a felon except there is no parole - right? If that's the case, then no, I don't think a convicted felon should be allowed to become an LEO. My vote may have skewed your results!

    Austin

  14. #29
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    Still, the case has been examined carefully

    Quote Originally Posted by RIA45 View Post
    This discussion isn't about Presidential or Governor pardons. I should have been more clear. In Georgia, the Board of Pardons and Parole has the authority to grant pardons. The Governor never sees it.
    Still, the case has been examined carefully and someone made a determination. I bet pardons are fairly rare and only given out in exceptional circumstances.

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIXTO View Post
    HMMM... depends. it isnt easy to get a pardon, so its not like your everyday garden variety criminal gets switch hit and become an LEO.
    Agreed.

    To get a pardon requires work and very much extenuating circumstances. Further it's functionally the same as being found not guilty, only after the fact of being falsely charged arraigned and wrongly sentenced. This does happen to real people.

    Further to become a LEO is not like getting a store security job at the mall where most any beating hard with interest can pass hiring muster.
    To become a LEO one has to generally go through academy which includes a background check there including psych eval. Then even before that the hiring PD would do a new applicant review of same toward sponsoring them through academy as a provisional employee. If he graduates academy then he comes back to the PD as a probationary and goes through 3months of post academy continued training and daily review. If he passes that then he is offered an opportunity to stay on board. After that another _year_ of probationary time with ongoing weekly review.
    Then after all that he/she is still on review by his fellow officers and superiors.

    I say if a _former_ felon who has been exonerated of the as convicted crime via a pardon and goes on to not only be a productive member of society but doubly does all of the above wanna be a LEo type stuff and he succeeds at that.
    Then hell yeah that dude has my respect and approval as a citizen to be working the job.

    - Janq voted B
    "Killers who are not deterred by laws against murder are not going to be deterred by laws against guns. " - Robert A. Levy

    "A license to carry a concealed weapon does not make you a free-lance policeman." - Florida Div. of Licensing

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