pardoned felon becomes police officer

This is a discussion on pardoned felon becomes police officer within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Originally Posted by aus71383 RIA45 - so these pardons are more like get out of jail free cards - its like granting parole to a ...

View Poll Results: Should felons be allowed to becom LEO after pardon?

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    33 37.08%
  • Yes - they've been forgiven

    20 22.47%
  • Yes - only in certain circumstances

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Thread: pardoned felon becomes police officer

  1. #31
    Member Array RIA45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aus71383 View Post
    RIA45 - so these pardons are more like get out of jail free cards - its like granting parole to a felon except there is no parole - right? If that's the case, then no, I don't think a convicted felon should be allowed to become an LEO. My vote may have skewed your results!

    Austin
    I won't say you skewed the vote because pardons are not get out of jail free cards. You can't have any other issues on your record. Even a DUI could sway the Board against you. Also, a parole officer interviews you about your pardon, your gun rights, etc. He the writes up a recommendation which is given along with his investigation into you. It's a 9 month process - or longer.

    georgia state board of pardons and paroles

    in 2008 there were only 560 pardons given, in 2007 there were 372.

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  3. #32
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    n 2008 there were only 560 pardons given, in 2007 there were 372.
    That's a hell of a lot of pardons for a single state to grant in a year. I would guess (haven't researched) that it is more than Clinton and both Bush's granted in their 12 years as President.

  4. #33
    VIP Member Array jwhite75's Avatar
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    Depends on the crime. Something like an violent crime where you were defending another person or your own life, or wrongfully convicted.

    Anyone watched LIFE on NBC? LAPD officer convicted wrongfully of killing somebody and framed, before DNA and forensic evidence is what it is now. He is released pardoend and gets his old job back and promoted to Detective. I know its TV but something like that. Yea why not?
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  5. #34
    New Member Array Texas4629's Avatar
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    Cool I am a pardoned felon from Georgia so obviously I say yes.

    Hello Friends-

    I am a 31 year old that has 10 felonies. I have also recieved a pardon with the restoration of right to bear arms. And I do.
    I am an avid hunter, husband, father of two and a successful business executive.
    Let me just tell you that getting a pardon is not an easy thing to do let alone the firearms portion of it.

    Conviction-
    Using my parents credit card when I was 17 to the tune of $900.
    Ill pass the boring details but I didn't steal the card, I just used it without permission.
    I was charged as an adult and stuck with 10 felonies.

    I spent a year in jail (was beat up and sent to the hospital) worked for the Jail
    90 days in boot camp & city clean up/ chosen to travel to schools in chains to warn kids about crime
    80 hrs community service
    Spent weekends on a road cleanup crew
    4 years of probation with monthly fees and random drug tests
    Endured the embarresment of having a probation officer show up at my home and work
    $900 restitution paid
    $10k + in court costs and attorney fees
    Years of missed job opportunities and more.

    I would say my debt has been paid many times over.

    It's been 13 years (half my life) and finally I'm able to at least get my CHL. I can never get rid of my record but its a small victory. I would be an excellent police officer as I have seen both sides and would have a more open mind to people and circumstances.

    So, in short yes... If you are able to recieve a full pardon then you should habe all career opportunities available. Have an open mind friend there are two sides to every story. Heck innocent people get convicted everyday and murderers walk free.

    I do not want to be a police officer so don't worry but it is my life's goal to make changes to our system of law.

    My character you ask?
    I recieved a pardon with no less than two dozen upstanding citizens.
    Police officers, lawyers, farmers a doctor and more.
    aus71383 likes this.

  6. #35
    Ex Member Array SayVandelay's Avatar
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    I think if every cop new what the other side of the law was like we wouldnt have bad cops. That doesnt mean all felons are fit for law enforcement, but it turns out not every cop is fit for it either. If a stranger deserves the chamce than someone who made it through a pardoning process probably deserves it too
    aus71383 likes this.

  7. #36
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Depends on the felony. The classification of "Felony" ain't what it once was. If the offense truly was a forgivable one and not hugely indicative of the person's basic honor or trustworthiness, I'd say it could be something I would accommodate in a hiring. It would absolutely depend on the circumstances, details, and the full-house grilling the candidate would get through the selection process. Can't say I'd do anything other than ratchet up the focus, to get to bottom of it all. Might well even be inclined to keep the person "secluded" in less-responsible roles for a good long while, too, though I'm sure the union would have much to say about that "offensive" treatment.

    And if it weren't clear, I'd pass on the candidate for cause.
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  8. #37
    Senior Member Array KBSR's Avatar
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    I didn't get an opportunity to vote, but I have to say that one size doesn't fit any. Each individual case needs to be considered on it's merit, and then decided.

    I have some personal experience in this area that I'd like to share. I have a family member, who was a Special Agent with a Federal Law Enforcement agency when he had a traffic accident, that resulted in the death of one person, and serious bodily injury to two others. Alcohol was NOT a factor, but speed, and passing in a no passing zone was.

    The District Attorney (DA) in the county where this accident too place took this accident to the grand jury, and my family member was charged with murder. Not vehicular homicide, or manslaughter, but murder! In order to understand fully, you'd have to know that the DA was as crook, and in fact, the FBI arrested him for protecting drug smuggling organizations between the time this case was indicted, and the trial date. This gave us hope, and we thought the case would now be dismissed, as it was really an accident, not a criminal act.

    The DA appointed by the Governor of the state refused to drop the case entirely, but allowed my family member to plead to manslaughter, which is a felony, with 5 years of unsupervised probation. The appointed DA was more worried about his political future, then doing the right thing. Not a huge surprise.

    We had already spent in excess of fifteen thousand dollars on attorney and investigator fees by this point. My advice, which was followed, was plead, and get on with your life. Our attorney candidly said we'd probably lose at trial, but would have a good chance in appeal. As a law enforcement officer myself, I wouldn't want to join people I'd arrested in prison, which is why I advised my family member to take the deal. Looking for a job when you got this one, and you can always do something else, other than law enforcement.

    This happened sometime around 1990. My family member has gone on to a successful career in a non-law enforcement area. For the past five years or so, he's attempted to get a pardon, without any luck.

    Like the two Border Patrol Agents, this guy could have contributed as a LEO, had he been given the opportunity, if he'd had any interest in doing it all again (which he didn't). I relate all of this, just to say you can't lump every convicted felon into the same pile, and judge them as unfit. Each case is different. Be safe.
    " But if you are authorized to carry a weapon, and you walk outside without it, just take a deep breath, and say this to yourself... Baa." Col. Dave Grossman on Sheep and Sheepdogs.

  9. #38
    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texas4629 View Post
    Hello Friends-

    I am a 31 year old that has 10 felonies. I have also recieved a pardon with the restoration of right to bear arms. And I do.
    I am an avid hunter, husband, father of two and a successful business executive.
    Let me just tell you that getting a pardon is not an easy thing to do let alone the firearms portion of it.

    Conviction-
    Using my parents credit card when I was 17 to the tune of $900.
    Ill pass the boring details but I didn't steal the card, I just used it without permission.
    I was charged as an adult and stuck with 10 felonies.

    I spent a year in jail (was beat up and sent to the hospital) worked for the Jail
    90 days in boot camp & city clean up/ chosen to travel to schools in chains to warn kids about crime
    80 hrs community service
    Spent weekends on a road cleanup crew
    4 years of probation with monthly fees and random drug tests
    Endured the embarresment of having a probation officer show up at my home and work
    $900 restitution paid
    $10k + in court costs and attorney fees
    Years of missed job opportunities and more.

    I would say my debt has been paid many times over.

    It's been 13 years (half my life) and finally I'm able to at least get my CHL. I can never get rid of my record but its a small victory. I would be an excellent police officer as I have seen both sides and would have a more open mind to people and circumstances.

    So, in short yes... If you are able to recieve a full pardon then you should habe all career opportunities available. Have an open mind friend there are two sides to every story. Heck innocent people get convicted everyday and murderers walk free.

    I do not want to be a police officer so don't worry but it is my life's goal to make changes to our system of law.

    My character you ask?
    I recieved a pardon with no less than two dozen upstanding citizens.
    Police officers, lawyers, farmers a doctor and more.
    Most parents don't file charges against their kid for one offense,sounds like they probably had enough of your crap and decided the credit card theft was the last straw,unless they handed you the card then you stole it,so don't try to candy coat your BS
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  10. #39
    Distinguished Member Array Arborigine's Avatar
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    Former California Insurance Commissioner Charles Quackenbush admitted to taking payoffs and resigned, did no time, and is a Florida Deputy Sheriff. I don't know if he is a good cop or not, but he should never be trusted.
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  11. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by celticredneck View Post
    Correct me if I am wrong, but isn't the only way to undo a wrongful conviction to be pardoned? In other words, doesn't someone who was wrongfully convicted of, say murder, get a pardon instead of just being released. If this is true, then I see no problem with that person having all of their rights restored including the right to be hired as an LEO.
    I'm not entirely sure of the legal issues, but I think a conviction can be overturned if evidence surfaces to indicate that the original conviction was wrong. Being pardoned means that the original conviction stands, but the person has been released from the legal penalities.
    Ben

    Cogito, ergo armatum sum. I think, therefore I am armed. (Don Mann, The Modern Day Gunslinger; the ultimate handgun training manual)


  12. #41
    New Member Array zatherith's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=farronwolf;1040111]I say never.

    If they are pardoned, they have not served their sentence, they have in fact been given a pass on the rest of their sentence, usually because of political reason.

    Actually if someone was able to receive a pardon they had to go through a lengthy and difficult process. First part is you have to have served your sentence to completion, unless you received the death penalty, before you can go back to court to petition to a judge for a pardon. You have to have shown that you deserve a pardon by working very hard and for a very long time( Years ) to clear your name and show accomplishments you have made to make yourself a better person. Only convicted felons who spend sometimes ten years or greater cleaning up their act actually get approved for a pardon.

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