Obese Account for Greatest Jump in Healthcare Spending...Jumped 80% in 5 years!

This is a discussion on Obese Account for Greatest Jump in Healthcare Spending...Jumped 80% in 5 years! within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; As reported by ABCNews.com: Obese Account for Greatest Jump in Healthcare Spending Study Shows Spending on Obesity Jumped 80 Percent in 5 Years By KRISTINA ...

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 49

Thread: Obese Account for Greatest Jump in Healthcare Spending...Jumped 80% in 5 years!

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array Janq's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    6,781

    Obese Account for Greatest Jump in Healthcare Spending...Jumped 80% in 5 years!

    As reported by ABCNews.com:

    Obese Account for Greatest Jump in Healthcare Spending
    Study Shows Spending on Obesity Jumped 80 Percent in 5 Years

    By KRISTINA FIORE
    MedPage Today Staff Writer

    July 9, 2009

    Health care spending on obese patients in the United States has ballooned, growing more than 80 percent ove a five-year period, researchers have found.


    Health care spending on obese patients in the U.S. has ballooned, growing more than 80 percent over a five-year period, researchers have found.
    (Getty Images)

    Spending on the heaviest members of the population rose to $303.1 billion in 2006 from $166.7 billion in 2001 -- an 82 percent increase, according to a statistical brief from the Agency for health care Research & Quality.

    That figure compares with a 36 percent increase in total expenditures for patients who were merely overweight and a 25 percent increase for normal-weight patients.

    The increase in spending on health care for overweight and obese Americans tracks the general rise in obesity in the U.S., as the number of obese jumped to 58.9 million from 48.2 million over the study period, according to Marie Stagnitti, a senior statistician with the AHRQ, and author of the brief.

    As a result, in 2006 overweight and obese adults represented 27.2 percent of the U.S. population, up from 23.6 percent in 2001. Conversely, the proportion of normal-weight individuals decreased from 39 percent to 36 percent.

    "Obese adults were associated with over half of the growth in health care spending between 2001 and 2006, and that's a remarkable figure," said Ken Thorpe, chair of health policy at Emory University, who was not involved in the study.

    "Also, there are more people who are clinically obese . . . so it's really a combination of both" elements that is driving spending, he told MedPage Today.

    Dr. Thorpe said that over time, more obese patients are being diagnosed with more chronic health problems, including diabetes, cholesterol, and heart disease, which also drives spending.

    The data confirm that observation, as the AHRQ report revealed that obese patients continuously had the highest proportion of chronic conditions -- 57.1 percent in 2001 compared with 59.7 percent in 2006.

    When it comes to total health care expenditures, the obese accounted for 35.3 percent of the bill in 2006, up from 28.1 percent in 2001.

    Normal Weight Patients Rack up Less in Health Care Spending

    Normal-weight patients have accounted for less of the bill, dropping from 35 percent to 30.3 percent over the study period.

    But while obese and overweight patients may account for a larger share of the health care dollar, even fit Americans faced higher health care costs during the five years studied.

    The average annual health care expenditure for the obese population increased to $5,148 from $3,458 over five years and jumped to $3,636 from $2,792 for the overweight population.

    Normal-weight patients spent an average of $3,315 in 2006 compared with from $2,607 in 2001.

    The article along with a video report can be found at; Obese Account for Greatest Jump in Healthcare Spending - ABC News

    Additional reading including detail on the definition of being "Obese" as opposed to 'Overweight' and 'Healthy Weight' can be found at the following;
    * Obesity and Overweight: Topics | DNPAO | CDC
    * Obesity and Overweight for Professionals: Defining | DNPAO | CDC
    * MedlinePlus: Obesity
    * MedlinePlus: Obesity in Children
    * Obesity - MayoClinic.com
    * Obesity In Children And Teens | American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
    * Overweight in Children
    * Obesity

    - Janq

    "Obesity is defined as having an excessive amount of body fat. Obesity is more than just a cosmetic concern, though. It increases your risk of diseases and health problems such as diabetes and high blood pressure....Today, about one in three American adults is considered to be obese, but obesity is also becoming an increasing health problem globally. The good news is that even modest weight loss can improve or prevent the health problems associated with obesity." - The Mayo Clinic
    "Killers who are not deterred by laws against murder are not going to be deterred by laws against guns. " - Robert A. Levy

    "A license to carry a concealed weapon does not make you a free-lance policeman." - Florida Div. of Licensing

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #2
    Ex Member Array GreenHorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Leawood Ks
    Posts
    405
    They need more fat farms with High Fence Hunts.

    Lower the the price of tags, extend the season, give youth hunters an extra 2 weeks early into the season. Allow primitve weapons such as spear, atlatl, bola, bows. Air it on Tv and watch all the people in this country drop weight faster then you can say "bad habit".

  4. #3
    VIP Member
    Array Hopyard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Disappeared
    Posts
    11,597
    I have been mostly skinny throughout my life though I am now at the high end of normal weight if not slightly above.

    I've known many obese people who were amazingly healthy. I had an uncle and his wife who lived well into their mid 80s with no unusual health issues. When heart disease caught up with them they decided to forego bypass surgery and just treat things conservatively. No big expense to anyone. No pain and inconvenience. Both died comfortably in their homes.

    There was a janitor where I worked who was horribly obese. In his mid 50, he had no signs of diabetes, no high cholesterol, no high blood pressure.

    I have also known some fairly skinny folks who developed diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, high cholesterol.

    I think there is a great deal that we do not know about obesity, and we should be very careful before we look down our noses on those who are obese.

    There is more going on physiologically than just eating too dang much and lack of self control.

  5. #4
    VIP Member
    Array Hopyard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Disappeared
    Posts
    11,597

    Clinical definitions and cut offs

    Quote Originally Posted by Janq View Post
    As reported by ABCNews.com:


    Dr. Thorpe said that over time, more obese patients are being diagnosed with more chronic health problems, including diabetes, cholesterol, and heart disease, which also drives spending.
    With all respect, the cut-offs for sugar levels, for total cholesterol and LDL values, and for blood pressure have been gradually lowered over the past 20 years. This causes some of the excess incidence.

    We need to be very careful about how we use the information accumulated and how we interpret it. Time was recently that bp of 140/80 was considered normal. Now, it is widely held that it should be kept below 120 if possible.

    The cynics say that there is a corrupt motive in lowering the normative values, to drive drug sales. I don't agree with the cynics but I do think we need to be might careful not to socially ostracize folks who are fat; something many have done for ages. Let's not institutionalize unwarranted discrimination.

  6. #5
    VIP Member Array mlr1m's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    okla
    Posts
    4,298
    First comes the studies, then comes the public polling. Once the support is there the Government feels free to step in. I already am hearing the talking heads claiming that it costs the public money when you are unhealthy. They use round about ways to come to this conclusion. If you are paying your own way and not on the Government dole you still cost the public in lost tax revenue if you miss work.

    Michael

  7. #6
    VIP Member Array automatic slim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    The western edge of The Confederacy
    Posts
    2,198

    Don't forget the worlds heaviest man........

    Quote Originally Posted by Hopyard View Post
    I have been mostly skinny throughout my life though I am now at the high end of normal weight if not slightly above.

    I've known many obese people who were amazingly healthy. I had an uncle and his wife who lived well into their mid 80s with no unusual health issues. When heart disease caught up with them they decided to forego bypass surgery and just treat things conservatively. No big expense to anyone. No pain and inconvenience. Both died comfortably in their homes.

    There was a janitor where I worked who was horribly obese. In his mid 50, he had no signs of diabetes, no high cholesterol, no high blood pressure.

    I have also known some fairly skinny folks who developed diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, high cholesterol.

    I think there is a great deal that we do not know about obesity, and we should be very careful before we look down our noses on those who are obese.

    There is more going on physiologically than just eating too dang much and lack of self control.


    He weighed in at over 1200 pounds but yet his Cholesterol was normal, blood pressure normal and blood sugar normal.
    "First gallant South Carolina nobly made the stand."
    Edge of Darkness

  8. #7
    VIP Member Array edr9x23super's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,108
    I can see where all this is going;

    Fat people are going to be stigmatized as being a selfish, unhealthy lot. If the government can't get away with it, they will "encourage" employers and the rest of society to do it for them. Hollyweird already does it; just look at any tabloid like People magazine or the star. I can remember well when actress Delta Burke was vilified in the press when she gained 30 pounds. There were actually people out there that thought she should be fired for gaining the weight.

    A couple of years ago, I had an argument with one of opur company executives over an employee who weighed 280 pounds. The guy wasn't fat, he was 6'7" tall and a former college lineman. At issue was the ladder he was having to use on the job, which only had a duty rating of 250lbs. The executive held that if the guy couldn't lose the weight, he would have to be terminated from employment. We talked him out of it, because the guy could do his job, and the HR department warned him that could expose the company to all kinds of lawsuits.

    Yet now we have "studies" coming out telling us how much being fat costs. It reminds me of another "study" that said that gun ownership was a huge healthcare cost to the American people. Even the CDC got in on the action. Kind of also reminds me of the "scientific" study of global warming and climate change, and how much money that is costing us........

    People, I think we need to a study on STUPID, and how much money THAT is costing us. Better yet, we should figure out how to tax STUPID, because I think that alone would probably exceed our GDP.....

    What an Idea!
    "Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect everyone who approaches that jewel. Unfortunately, nothing will preserve it but downright force. Whenever you give up that force, you are inevitably ruined". - Patrick Henry

  9. #8
    VIP Member Array Janq's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    6,781
    Quote Originally Posted by automatic slim View Post
    He weighed in at over 1200 pounds but yet his Cholesterol was normal, blood pressure normal and blood sugar normal.
    And yet he still was far from being even remotely healthful in the physical and on the whole, those specific indicators aside.


    My Shocking Story World's Heaviest Man: Discovery Channel
    Medical Mystery: Morbid Obesity - ABC News

    There are always exceptions to any rule and oddities at that too.
    But exceptions and oddities are not the rule, even as blood sugar level cut offs may have been reduced for any given reason and folks have lived seemingly with no ill effects to reach any given elder age even as they the entire time acted poorly. Keith Richards is an excellent example of such an odd exception to human rules.

    Being alive is not necessarily living, even as ones heart continues to work seemingly okay.

    - Janq
    "Killers who are not deterred by laws against murder are not going to be deterred by laws against guns. " - Robert A. Levy

    "A license to carry a concealed weapon does not make you a free-lance policeman." - Florida Div. of Licensing

  10. #9
    Senior Member Array boscobeans's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    upstate new york
    Posts
    1,176
    Some people argue that a very great portion of today's healthcare expenses are due to the fact that we are living longer and longer. This new longevity causes increases in "old age" or assisted living and senior healthcare centers. These facilities are growing in numbers and can now be found everywhere whereas in the past they were few and far between. They have taken the place of growing old in the family home where family members once cared for the elderly. Now the burden goes from the family to a medical facility and thus becomes another cost of nationwide healthcare. A year in one of these places comes with a staggering cost. Think about 2-3-5 or more years living in a place that is more expensive than a lot of 5 star hotels.. Now those figures sure make healthcare climb. IMHO

    What's the solution ? I hope nobody condones the idea of the government operated "Going Home" facilities in Soylent Green.
    bosco

  11. #10
    VIP Member Array mlr1m's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    okla
    Posts
    4,298
    A couple years back there was an excellent editorial in the paper about the subject of healthcare costs. I can't remember the guys name but he's a regular on Sunday morning panels.

    His point was that stopping smoking actually increased costs to the government. You will live longer and will still get sick from other things which will require health care. You will also be a drain on Social Security as well as private companies health care and retirement costs. The hospitals will be over run by older patients that will need a bed because of illness's that younger people won't need for those same problems.

    Michael

  12. #11
    VIP Member
    Array Hopyard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Disappeared
    Posts
    11,597

    Learning from the oddities

    Quote Originally Posted by Janq View Post
    And yet he still was far from being even remotely healthful in the physical and on the whole, those specific indicators aside.


    My Shocking Story World's Heaviest Man: Discovery Channel
    Medical Mystery: Morbid Obesity - ABC News

    There are always exceptions to any rule and oddities at that too.

    - Janq
    Our scientists and physicians need to be thinking hard and carefully about these oddities; about guys like the janitor where I worked who
    show no sign of any disease though they are obese.

    These oddities are telling us that we do not understand the picture, that we are making false assumptions about obesity and the consequences of it, that we are attempting to treat the wrong problem.

    All things being equal it is certainly best for folks to try to control their weight within reasonable limits and within normal values when possible. However, we are far from a complete understanding of the relationship between obesity and health, and we have too little in the way of obesity treatment to be getting on those who are obese and demanding that they do something about it.

    I've heard that there is evidence that the epidemic of obesity might in fact be due to uncontrollable variables such as an hypothesized "obesity virus," or perhaps to a bowel disease not understood, and so on.

    The dramatic and completely unexpected nor understood effects of stomach stapling and similar procedures on diabetes are ample evidence that we don't yet know enough to be demanding that folks make great effort to control their weight against their own physiology.

    To keep this somewhat on the topic of concealed carry, I used to do martial arts with a man who was really too too big. I truly liked the guy, but going hand to hand with him left me covered in a sweaty-fat like goo, and the fear of him breaking me without realizing what he was doing--due to his own strength was a concern. Surgery made a dramatic difference. Night and day. Last time I saw him, which was a few months after his procedure, I didn't recognize him at all.

    There is more going on in the weight loss mechanism behind the success of these surgeries than mere restriction of food intake. The docs and the medical community are aware of this, but an actual understanding has not yet emerged.

  13. #12
    Ex Member Array United93's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    911
    One word: Prevention.

  14. #13
    Member Array alfack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Marysville, Washington
    Posts
    320
    Gee, I wonder who is going to be for nationalized health care?

  15. #14
    Distinguished Member Array morintp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    1,233
    Well if smokers have to pay extra taxes to fund healthcare for needy kids not to mention the other taxes and higher insurance premiums they already pay, maybe the obese should have to pay extra to help offset their healthcare expenses.

    A few months ago we had a thread going about the new tobacco taxes and it seemed that roughly 75% of the people in the discussion were in favor of the increased taxes. Since then I have heard reports of additional taxes on soda and other "sugary" products and a tax on beer. This report here is probably a prelude to a discussion for a fat tax.
    64,999,987 firearms owners killed no one yesterday.

  16. #15
    VIP Member
    Array Hopyard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Disappeared
    Posts
    11,597

    taxes on smoking v obese

    Quote Originally Posted by morintp View Post
    Well if smokers have to pay extra taxes to fund healthcare for needy kids not to mention the other taxes and higher insurance premiums they already pay, maybe the obese should have to pay extra to help offset their healthcare expenses.
    There is a big difference. Smoking is a choice. Quitting is also mostly a choice. Notwithstanding the stuff about nicotine addiction.

    Obesity is not a choice. There are folks who drastically restrict their diets, exercise, and somehow nothing works. The calories in equals pounds on thing is nice in theory. And I understand the theory.

    But the reality is that some folks just can not lose weight until the surgery is done. They suffer from an illness which is way more than a lack of ordinary irresponsibility--which smoking is*
    ___________________________________________
    I will confess to enjoying my cigars. And since I'm not fat, let's tax the fat folks and drop the tobacco tax :-)

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. The Healthcare Law, and it's Effect on Veterans
    By usmcj in forum Law Enforcement, Military & Homeland Security Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: May 12th, 2010, 08:42 AM
  2. Healthcare Aftermath.
    By xsigma40cal in forum Carry & Defensive Scenarios
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: March 22nd, 2010, 11:41 AM
  3. For the obese? (warning: disturbing graphics)
    By Paymeister in forum Defensive Carry Holsters & Carry Options
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: April 9th, 2008, 10:01 AM
  4. Concealed carry for obese people
    By dwpa in forum Defensive Carry Holsters & Carry Options
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: June 10th, 2006, 02:54 PM