No thumb, no thumbprint

No thumb, no thumbprint

This is a discussion on No thumb, no thumbprint within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; No Thumbprint, No Check-Cashing, Bank Told Armless Man Gotta love corporate bureaucracy....

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  1. #1
    Member Array Random's Avatar
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    No thumb, no thumbprint

    No Thumbprint, No Check-Cashing, Bank Told Armless Man

    Gotta love corporate bureaucracy.


  2. #2
    VIP Member Array Paco's Avatar
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    Nice, just one more reason I don't bank with them anymore.
    "Don't hit a man if you can possibly avoid it; but if you do hit him, put him to sleep." - Theodore Roosevelt

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  3. #3
    Senior Member Array BamaSteve's Avatar
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    I'm curious about how he knew the federal law would pertain to this particular instance on demand. Just a quick thought, not judging.
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  4. #4
    Distinguished Member Array nutz4utwo's Avatar
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    So first off- he was trying to cash a check in a bank that he had no account in. He was trying to use his wife's account. That is the ghetto-lame way to get cash from a bank.

    There is a ton of fraud in the ghetto check cashing business and banks take steps to protect themselves. Getting a thumbprint seems perfectly fine to me. Then if your check is fraudulent, they can call the LEO's and submit your print...

    This guy need to get/use his own bank account! Or get added to his wife's. If you act ghetto, you get treated ghetto

  5. #5
    Senior Member Array TheShadow's Avatar
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    He should have used both his prosthetic middle fingers and told the teller and manager where to go... then file a lawsuit to stop this from happening to any other handicapped individual
    “Put your pain in a box. Lock it down. No man is stronger than one who can harness his emotions.” -Act of Valor

  6. #6
    Distinguished Member Array TerriLi's Avatar
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    Their policy says a person without an account can cash a check with them, they denied it only because he had no thumbs. Sounds like a case of discrimation.
    I know not what this "overkill" means.

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  7. #7
    Senior Member Array Rob P.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nutz4utwo View Post
    So first off- he was trying to cash a check in a bank that he had no account in. He was trying to use his wife's account. That is the ghetto-lame way to get cash from a bank.

    There is a ton of fraud in the ghetto check cashing business and banks take steps to protect themselves. Getting a thumbprint seems perfectly fine to me. Then if your check is fraudulent, they can call the LEO's and submit your print...

    This guy need to get/use his own bank account! Or get added to his wife's. If you act ghetto, you get treated ghetto
    It's obvious that you have no idea what you are talking about so you should take the time to educate yourself before you contract a larger case of foot in mouth disease.

    For you edification: If a bank depositor issues a check, the bank that the check was drawn on HAS TO honor that check if the account has sufficient funds in it. All the bank needs to do is verify that the person attempting to cash the check is the person to whom it was written. There is no "ghetto" about it because this is a NORMAL banking transaction.

    The bank can set daily limits as to how much cash may be withdrawn, but that is a policy designed to protect the depositors from fraud or robbery. IF the check was below that limit, then the bank has to honor it.

    The problem here is that the bank forgot one thing. They deal with PEOPLE and people have this tendency to need special things once in awhile. This means that your "policies" can't be inflexible when confronted with an out of the ordinary situation. Such as here where the person had no arms so couldn't provide a thumbprint.

    Accepting his 2 forms of ID AND making a phone call would have saved the bank the millions they are now probably going to have to pay.

  8. #8
    VIP Member Array HKinNY's Avatar
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    How about a big toe print? If I had no thumbs I would ask the female teller if she would accept..... Nevermind don't need the points against me.

  9. #9
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    Probably not millions, but substantial

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob P. View Post
    Accepting his 2 forms of ID AND making a phone call would have saved the bank the millions they are now probably going to have to pay.
    Probably not millions, but still possibly substantial.

    The lack of brains here reminds me of a situation in which I was doing business at a bank, with a clerk who knew full well who I was, but the paper work/bank rules required that I produce TWO IDs anyway. I gave my DL, and not having another photo ID other than my CHL with me, I gave her that one. She rejected it and said she couldn't use that one; but then she was willing to take my AAA membership card for the second ID. Bank employees sometimes do strange things in their efforts to follow what they think are the rules.

  10. #10
    Member Array tflhndn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BamaSteve View Post
    I'm curious about how he knew the federal law would pertain to this particular instance on demand. Just a quick thought, not judging.
    I would guess that having lived his life as a disabled person, he is fairly familiar with the Americans with Disabilities Act... kind of like most of us are fairly knowledgeable about guns laws... because it is improtant to us...

  11. #11
    Senior Member Array BamaSteve's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tflhndn View Post
    I would guess that having lived his life as a disabled person, he is fairly familiar with the Americans with Disabilities Act... kind of like most of us are fairly knowledgeable about guns laws... because it is improtant to us...
    I was just offering up a thought on how he knew on spot that federal law prevented a bank teller from refusing the check because he couldn't provide a thumb print due to the lack of thumbs.

    Just trying to look at this from more than the obvious angle. I'm a naturally skeptical person. I saw no mention of whether or not he had been to this bank or other BOAs in the past to do a similar thing, something I would have thought would come up in an article such as this.

    Just keeping the thread fresh
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  12. #12
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    re: BamaSteve, how he knew

    Quote Originally Posted by BamaSteve View Post
    I was just offering up a thought on how he knew on spot that federal law prevented a bank teller from refusing the check because he couldn't provide a thumb print due to the lack of thumbs.

    Just trying to look at this from more than the obvious angle. I'm a naturally skeptical person. I saw no mention of whether or not he had been to this bank or other BOAs in the past to do a similar thing, something I would have thought would come up in an article such as this.

    Just keeping the thread fresh
    That was a good question, but as someone else pointed out, folks in that situation learn the laws that they need to know. I knew a guy who was confined to a wheel chair. He was the go to guy at work when anyone had a question either about the ADA or the Rehabilitation Act. BTW, for anyone interested, ADA was amended and revised and the revised ADA was signed by Mr. Bush Jr. a month or so before he left office. It is now even more stringent than before in certain matters and binds Uncle to the ADA by incorporating its provisions into The Rehabilitation Act. Before, Uncle didn't have to follow its own rules on disability, though it generally did as a matter of policy.

  13. #13
    Distinguished Member Array nutz4utwo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob P. View Post
    It's obvious that you have no idea what you are talking about so you should take the time to educate yourself before you contract a larger case of foot in mouth disease.
    Please play nice... there is no need for that sort of talk.


    For you edification: If a bank depositor issues a check, the bank that the check was drawn on HAS TO honor that check if the account has sufficient funds in it. All the bank needs to do is verify that the person attempting to cash the check is the person to whom it was written. There is no "ghetto" about it because this is a NORMAL banking transaction.

    The bank can set daily limits as to how much cash may be withdrawn, but that is a policy designed to protect the depositors from fraud or robbery. IF the check was below that limit, then the bank has to honor it.

    The problem here is that the bank forgot one thing. They deal with PEOPLE and people have this tendency to need special things once in awhile. This means that your "policies" can't be inflexible when confronted with an out of the ordinary situation. Such as here where the person had no arms so couldn't provide a thumbprint.
    Give this a read:

    Not a customer? Bank isn't required to cash check - MarketWatch

    Not a customer? Forget about it

    "The courts have held that consumers have no right to be able to cash a check if they are not a customer," said Mark E. Budnitz, law professor at Georgia State University in Atlanta. "I don't know of any decisions where the customer won."

    This seems to unfairly penalize people who don't have bank accounts. However, it's also true that check-cashing fraud is widespread. That can mean a loss to the bank if it cashes your check and you're not who you say you are.


    Accepting his 2 forms of ID AND making a phone call would have saved the bank the millions they are now probably going to have to pay.
    Lawsuits get very complicated very quickly and I doubt this is a simple one. He was not a customer at the bank and did not have any accounts at the bank. Are they required to serve him? Can they refuse service? Does the ADA act apply if the person in question is not an employee or not a customer? "Right to refuse service to anyone?"

    I agree that B of A could have handled the situation much better, but that doesn't mean they were required to. I also think this guy could have taken the check to his bank and deposited it or even signed up for a new account- no problem.

  14. #14
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    BoA should have handled it better/ different issue

    Quote Originally Posted by nutz4utwo View Post
    I agree that B of A could have handled the situation much better, but that doesn't mean they were required to. I also think this guy could have taken the check to his bank and deposited it or even signed up for a new account- no problem.
    I don't think this is really relevant. The bank was clearly willing to cash the check but conditioned that willingness on the presenter's ability to provide a thumb print; not something he could reasonably be expected to do. The issue isn't whether or not the bank was required to cash the check, the issue is whether or not they discriminated by demanding the thumb print.

    It is inconceivable that on a daily basis, BoA doesn't routinely cash very many checks for very many people under the identical set of circumstances, minus the thumb print issue. That makes it a disability discrimination thingy and not an issue over the bank's general right (if it has one) to refuse to cash a check drawn on its own customer's account.

    FWIW, I do not do any business with any company that asks for a thumb print--I give that only to Uncle or my state officials. There was a brief time when one of the now (hee heee) bankrupt and out of business large retailers tried to collect thumb prints along with signatures to process a credit card transaction. I left my merchandise (it was hundreds of dollars worth of electronics) at the register and went elsewhere. When a business doesn't know what a customer is, they don't deserve customers.

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