American History for kids

This is a discussion on American History for kids within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; This is another way off topic thread, but I think a lot of you will take interest and have information for me. I was talking ...

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Thread: American History for kids

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    American History for kids

    This is another way off topic thread, but I think a lot of you will take interest and have information for me.

    I was talking to a couple of neighborhood kids the other day when they came over to play with my son. These kids were a little older than my son, they were in 2nd and 3rd grade. My boy is in 1st.
    Anyway, we were talking, and none of the boys knew who Paul Revere or Ben Franklin were. I would have thought they would've at least had a general idea of the importance of these men by now.

    Nope, none. They wanted to know if they were on TV.
    I did some checking, and the public school doesn't teach American history until Jr. High! What?! I can't believe it.

    So now I'm on a role here. I have my boy very interested and I'm looking for good resources for him. (keep in mind he is 6, they need to be simple for now) I'd like to find some factual yet entertaining enough books or other resources for him to learn his history.

    Do any of you have suggestions? How about you home schoolers?

    I'm off to the library to take a look there...
    "Just blame Sixto"

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    VIP Member Array Supertac45's Avatar
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    A lot depends upon his reading level. I always found historical accounts of the fur trade era forward interesting from my earliest memories. There should be some Lewis and Clark stories available that are written for children to start with.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Supertac45 View Post
    A lot depends upon his reading level. I always found historical accounts of the fur trade era forward interesting from my earliest memories. There should be some Lewis and Clark stories available that are written for children to start with.
    He reads at a third grade level, but I would probably read most of it to him or at least with him anyway. I'm looking for more simple historical accounts. At this age, he doesnt need the gritty details, just the basic understanding and historical stories to keep his interest up.
    "Just blame Sixto"

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    Your son may be a little young for this book, but if you read it to him, or better yet, with him,he may start to understand what was involved in founding our nation. The books title is "Private Yankee Doodle", by J.P. Martin. It is a memoir of a young man's service in the Continental Army, from the battles for NY, all the way to Yorktown. It's not graphic in it's telling, but the author tells his story in detail. After all, he was the young soldier.

    I'll try to come up with some other titles suitable for a 6 year old. I've seen some good ones over the years. 20+ of them spent re-enacting the Revolutionary War.

    Sad to say, the lack of teaching our history is common in most schools. And at the same time, I'm off to do a presentation at a local grade school this afternoon on 18th century life. With the help of my wife and 10 year old grandson(homeschooling naturally!).

    John

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    The School House Rock DVD set is great resource for that age and older.

    The Shot Heard 'Round The World, No More Kings, The Preamble, etc. That's how I first learned the Preamble to the Constitution.

    And they actually include now unpopular facts like how the colonist used their own weapons to fight the British..

    “And the shot heard 'round the world
    Was the start of the Revolution.
    The Minute Men were ready, on the move.
    Take your powder, and take your gun.
    Report to General Washington.
    Hurry men, there's not an hour to lose!”



    http://www.amazon.com/Schoolhouse-Ro...6316338&sr=8-1


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-dDmE2OKNlw
    Blessed be the Lord my rock who trains my hands for war and my fingers for battle. Psalm 144:1

    Si vis pacem, para bellum

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    The School House Rock thing is good; except Revere road to Lexington, not Concord.

    Just sayin
    "Just blame Sixto"

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    I actually have old history books from my grade school, i think one of them is American history, which I had in like 4th grade, if you would be interested. I'll try to think of some other good resources.

    FWIW, my history degree and the one that people who want to teach history in Ohio public schools took had extremely different curriculum. Mine was all based in military history, and it seems all of theirs were more concerned with being politically correct (I'm not saying that those other forms of history aren't important to learn, but that program leaned pretty much all that way). American military history and general American history weren't a big part of that curriculum.
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIXTO View Post
    The School House Rock thing is good; except Revere road to Lexington, not Concord.

    Just sayin
    It didn't say he road to Concord in the song...


    "The British are coming! The British are coming!"
    Now, the ride of Paul Revere
    Set the nation on its ear,
    And the shot at Lexington heard 'round the world,
    When the British fired in the early dawn
    The War of Independence had begun,
    The die was cast, the rebel flag unfurled.

    And on to Concord marched the foe
    To seize the arsenal there you know,"
    Blessed be the Lord my rock who trains my hands for war and my fingers for battle. Psalm 144:1

    Si vis pacem, para bellum

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    Reminds me of episode 86 of The Andy Griffith Show...

    Opie and several of his friends, bored by history class, complained that they shouldn’t have to learn such dull stuff. Andy—with true aim, targeting the imaginations of the boys—reminds them that history is about “Indians and Redcoats and cannons and guns and muskets and stuff.” He then tells them a slightly overcooked version of Paul Revere’s midnight ride and “the shot heard ‘round the world.’” As the story intensifies, the camera closes in on the boys (and Barney!)—eyes wide, mouths open, muscles tense, completely absorbed in the story. -William Chad Newsom

    Andy Discovers America VIDEO
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    SIXTO,

    Another suggestion, away from the books, is see if you can find and go to a couple of reenactments with him. I've done F&I and Revolutionary War period reenacting, and nothing raises interest more than seeing first hand how people lived and coped back in those days.

    One of the groups I belong to has periodic "show and tell" events, like an annual weekend one at Ft. Niagara where the kids get to try things like starting a fire with flint and steel, and ask all the questions they can think of.
    Rick

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    Quote Originally Posted by rstickle View Post
    SIXTO,

    Another suggestion, away from the books, is see if you can find and go to a couple of reenactments with him. I've done F&I and Revolutionary War period reenacting, and nothing raises interest more than seeing first hand how people lived and coped back in those days.

    One of the groups I belong to has periodic "show and tell" events, like an annual weekend one at Ft. Niagara where the kids get to try things like starting a fire with flint and steel, and ask all the questions they can think of.
    Good suggestion!

    Here in Virginia, we have some "living" museums, which might help also.

    BTW -- the DAR has contest and programs in the schools etc

    Junior American Citizens
    Open to all students pre-K-12. JAC promotes good citizenship through teaching U.S. history and the principles of government. The programs provide practical ideas for patriotism that children can use at home, school or in their communities. Children can participate in various contests on the local, state, and national level. Currently, there are more than 270,000 JAC members in public, private, and parochial schools, and community centers. Membership is free.

    American History Essay Contest
    More than 4,000 schools participate in this annual contest for students in grades 5-8, with nearly 66,000 essays submitted yearly. Medals and certificates recognizing class participation are awarded to students and outstanding teachers.

    DAR Museum Programs
    DAR offers various programs for local children through their schools or Girl Scout organizations which teach students about colonial life.

    Summer Camps
    Quilt Camp and Colonial Camp are summer programs sponsored by the DAR Museum that teach children about their American heritage through hands-on experience.
    The Junior American Citizens Committee (JAC) is DAR's second oldest youth-oriented committee, preceded only by the Children of the American Revolution. Students have particiapted in JAC since October 1901. The original objectives of this committee were: 'To instill good citizenship in the youth of all races, creeds and economic backgrounds, by teaching loyalty to the United States of America, giving practical ideas for service to home, community, school, and country; thus encouraging a deeper sense of social responsibility and increasing interest in the study of Civics, Social Studies and the History of the U.S.A.' Reaching out to students in grades K-12 across America, the committee fosters the idea that the rights and responsibilities of citizenship can, and should, be taught from an early age.

    The JAC Contest is open to all students in preschool through high school, students in public, private, and parochial schools as well as in sanctioned homestudy programs, including those students who may be physically or mentally challenged or in gifted/talented programs. Youth groups may also participate. This contest is conducted without regard to gender, race, religion, or national origin. Any school, organization, or person can participate in the JAC Contest using the materials provided free of charge, under the sponsorship of the local DAR chapter. There is NO COST to participants.

    For more information about the JAC Contest, contact the DAR at (202) 628-1776.
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    Sixto, I am in the same boat with my kids. They are all avid readers and I am tired of them only reading Nacy Drew, etc. outside of school.

    I know of one source that is great, he republishes older books before they have been attacked by the revisionist movement. He is also a great source for homeschoolers.

    Richard "Little Bear" Wheeler with Mantle Ministries does great work, even has a Summer camp.

    We went down to the big Texas Homeschool Coalition book fair a few years ago and he did a story of Alvin York, in period clothing, as well as William Wallace.

    I highly suggest his books and videos.
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    If you are ever in Nassau County. Check out the Old Bethapge Village Resteration. This is 2 traffic lights from my house. I have been there twice. 1 x school field trip 2 x with wife when we were dating. Cool place. Nassau County Department of Parks, Recreation & Museums

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    I have taken him to some small civil war reenactments, but he was to young to really grasp what was going on. I think I will do so again this summer.
    "Just blame Sixto"

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