Does anyone have any cool, interesing, or crazy war experinces they would like to..

This is a discussion on Does anyone have any cool, interesing, or crazy war experinces they would like to.. within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Does anyone have any cool, interesing, or crazy war experinces they would like to share! For me, My dad was in Vietnam, his plane was ...

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  1. #1
    Member Array fitznig's Avatar
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    Does anyone have any cool, interesing, or crazy war experinces they would like to..

    Does anyone have any cool, interesing, or crazy war experinces they would like to share!

    For me,

    My dad was in Vietnam, his plane was taking off and right after they left the runway, they were shot multiple times, and the plane was on fire, smoke billowed into the fuselage and guys were running to get parachutes on and were going to jump outta the door, but guys told them not to because it would kill them all, and everybody was freaking out, but they landed the plane on the runway, everyone ran outta the plane, all unarmed, however, my dad grabbed his gun thinking they might have to fight what ever it was right after they exit the plane, he was the only one that grabbed a gun since everyone else was damn concerned to get off the plane before it exploaded, but no one shot at them and they all exited the plane safely and no one got hurt.

    My grandpa was in World War 2, he was a 3rd stripe Buck SGT and was a construction person making roads for the vehicles to go on, he was over in I forget what country they had red sand, but anyway, the buldoozer hit a steel gurder in a fence, and money went flying out everywhere , he said people were going crazy running all over catching the money, laughing, and jumping up and down! My grandpa didn't get any, but he said one guy got away with over 8 grand, however, it was all takin away before they went on the boat trip back to America!

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Array GoodSamaritan's Avatar
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    My Grandpa, who will be 93, next week btw. Was a messenger in WWII. He was issued a jeep and an M1 carbine. He spent a lot of the war, by himself on some dirt road, going back and forth. He went through 5 jeeps during the war. He wore out 2, had one shot out from under him, wrecked another (had to abandon it ), and left the last one sitting in the motor pool when they sent him home.

    He has some interesting tales, like being out in the middle of nowhere, and hearing this roar ing sound. At first he thought something was wrong with his jeep and shut it off to investigate. The roar got louder, and became a dark cloud on the horizon. It eventually turned into a bunch of Allied bombers on a massive raid. (he doesn't remember the date, but it was close to if not on, D day.) He said he just sat in the jeep and watched the planes go over in amazement. He didn't think there were that many planes in the whole world, and they were flying in formations so close that it got considerably darker at ground level. He sat and watched them for a few minutes and then got back to work.

    Earlier in the war, he was on a road that was not supposed to be under fire. Nobody told the germans that. He was going along when some bored german artilery decided to use him for target practice.
    Fortunately they missed the jeep, but it still hit close enough that he hit the hole and it flipped over. Miraculously the jeep landed so that the cutout portion where you get in and out was over him and other than having the shifter bruise the heck out of his knee, he was ok. This is probably where I would have died. My grandpa, has always had a legendary calm under pressure. He got his legs wrapped under the jeep around one of the seat frames, and played dead. He figured if they could hit a jeep going 30mph they could sure kill a guy on foot. So he layed there from mid morning till around midnight. At some point during the day, the germans came down and went through the stuff thrown from the jeep and went through his pockets as he lay there. They made off with his cigarettes, and other stuff, but didn't check him out to closely. He waited until what he thought would be midnight and crawled out. It took him several days to get back to his unit.

    On another occasion near the end of the war, he was stationed in some small town and had just gone to bed when he heard a plane coming in low and a sputtering engine. He looked out and saw it clear the trees on the other end of town near a little lake, and heard it splash when it crashed in the water. The next morning he made some excuses and took his jeep up to the lake to see what was left of the plane. As he stood on shore debating whether to wade out to it, he heard the "CLACK, CLACK", of a weapon chambering a round somewhere in the trees behind him.
    He stood there a minute and pretended not to hear it. He figured if he turned around the german would shoot him. His M1 was in the jeep a few feet away. So he just stood there and tried not to look terrified for a few moments. He casually walked back over to the jeep and drove away. After he got back, he told his story to an MP buddy and went to change his underwear.

    Last but not least, my dad told one on my grandpa as well. They were at a gas station when all of a sudden there was a commotion. People went to yelling and running away from a car across from them. Somehow the gas tank had caught on fire, and flames were coming from the filler neck on it. (1950's) Dad said he started to get out of there as well, but my grandpa took of his old beat up hat, dunked it in a nearby bucket of rain water, calmly walked over and hung it on the flaming filler tube. It sizzled for a few seconds and smoked a bit but the fire went right out. The attendent who had been the first to freak out, thanked him profusely. My grandpa never said a word, but put a few bills on the counter, smilled a little bit and then pulled the attendents new looking hat off his head, plopped it on his own and walked away.

    I am telling you the man doesn't have a fight or flight instinct, or at least they have been dulled so much that very little since WWII has been able to compare.


    On a side note, these are the stories he has told for years, there are a great many he will not tell. For instance he was involved in the clean up at the Bruekenwald (sp?) death camp. He has talked about it a little bit, but will take the rest of it to his grave with him. I can tell you this, he has never knowingly owned a german made product, nor has he ever failed to back anyone into a corner who made any kind of antisemitic remarks. Oh, and BTW, he still has that M1 Carbine.

  4. #3
    Senior Member Array SOLOLUCKY's Avatar
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    cool stories!
    i love to hear them.
    my grampa who was in panama during WWII has told a few.
    none as exciting as the above though.

    mostly about living in a jungle for a few years (panama jungle)
    they had local guides at times and he/they came across a snake. before he got to close the local said "1 bite you die" he said he gained a new respect for them and there jungle after that.
    R1

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    Lets keep it that way.

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    Member Array RjVA's Avatar
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    Great stories, please thank you Dad's and Grandpa's for us....
    "Sic Semper Tyrannis"

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    My Dad was in the European Theater. He was an "Engineer", which meant before a planned advance he and his team would dipose of ordnance in their line of planned advance, usually the day and/or night before the advances.

    He thought it was a great job, because he and the other men he was with got their "pick" of the fresh eggs, the chickens, pigs, or cattle that happened to be in a "line of fire" ("darn!"). Now, I only know the above, because he had to explain his job to put the following story in a frame of reference:

    "The ONLY war story I EVER heard from my Dad"

    The "team" would often "procure" eggs or fresh meat while venturing out in front from the main lines. They always shared the bounty, even if only an egg or two, amongst themselves, BUT for one particular very selfish fella, who always kept HIS spoils to himself. Occassionally, if a cow or pig had foolheartedly stepped in front of a weapon being "cleaned", many more servicemen shared the "spoils". They labored together, and shared together. One night the team had completed their mission, and approached a small barn to hunker down. They secured the barn, and to their delight realized fresh eggs and chicken might be on the menu. To their dismay, however, the fella that never shared had already gathered up an entire helmet full of fresh eggs - all of them! All of them!

    Another fella, who'd "had his share" of selfish behavior by this other guy, walked over to him, admired all of the eggs, and then proceeded to scramble 'em with the muddy butt of his rifle. He smiled, turned around, and walked away....

    And that, my friends, is the ONLY story I ever heard from my Dad.

    Only as an adult son, from a study of the history of the unit he was in, could I guess here'd he'd been and had to go, and see. I can only guess the terror, and knew why he would never talk about it.
    Richard

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    Senior Member Array Tom357's Avatar
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    My Grandfather was in the Army for WWII. He was not allowed to transition to Europe with his unit, because of flat feet. They put him on guard detail at POW camps, here in the States. It was just as well, because his former unit was wiped out. He was the only survivor.

    He told a couple of stories about the German POW's. When he was assigned to a camp in Alabama, the POW's worked in peach orchards during the day. One quiet night, everything broke loose. The siren went off and the guards were told to turn out with riot gear. Seems the prisoners had been filching peaches and packets of sugar, and being good Germans, had come up with some potent homebrew! They were singing drinking songs and dancing, and tried to share with the guards. The guards decided they weren't hurting anything, and let them party on. My grandfather made it sound like some of the POW camps were pretty laid back.

    At a camp in Washington State, there was a POW who was a talented carver. He would make carved boxes to sell in town. Every weekend, he would be allowed to take his boxes into town and sell them. Eventually, he became a trustee, and was allowed to go into town on Saturday morning, and return in the evening. This went on for some time, and then one Saturday evening, he didn't return. They started searching for him. No sign of him on Sunday. They start a serious manhunt. On Monday afternoon, he comes walking up to the gate and asks to be let in. My grandfather said the guy was smiling as he was led to the brig. They asked him where he had gone, and he said, "Nowhere." He had sold all his boxes, taken his money, and his girlfriend, bought a ring and gotten engaged. He said he was a little poorer, but he was going to be a happy man after the war.
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  8. #7
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    My Dad was an Infantryman with the 96th Division in WW2. He was WIA on Okinawa. While he was recuperating in the hospital in Hawaii, he received a "Dear John" letter from my mother.

    I was 2 years old at the time. I didn't find out about this until about 5 years ago.

    How's that for a war story?


    When you’re wounded and left on Afghanistan’s plains,
    And the women come out to cut up what remains,
    Just roll to your rifle and blow out your brains,
    And go to your God like a soldier.

    Rudyard Kipling


    Terry

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    Member Array Forscythe87's Avatar
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    I was once told its very rude and disrespectful to ask a veteran for their war stories. Not sure if many of you agree with that but from that day on ill stick to not asking.

    Now if they offer to tell a story its great!

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    Senior Member Array tanksoldier's Avatar
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    Hmmm... best story I have is the tank commander in my platoon who went over to the barrel burning latriene waste, wrapped some burning TP from the barrel around a fence picket, and ran around like it was the Olympic torch while we all made sounds _somewhat_ resembling the "Chariots of Fire" anthem.
    "I am a Soldier. I fight where I am told, and I win where I fight." GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

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    Member Array fitznig's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruger P345
    I was once told its very rude and disrespectful to ask a veteran for their war stories. Not sure if many of you agree with that but from that day on ill stick to not asking.

    Now if they offer to tell a story its great!
    How is it disrespectful to ask someone about their experince in a war, a person that gave me all the freedoms in this world and everyone else in the United States their freedoms by fighting in these horrible horrible experinces? If anything, it honors them, because we are interested. It is very disresptful not to hear all their tales and war stories. Because once its gone, its gone forever, and it can never be regenerated. Each veteran in each war should be valued highly in by book. Now some war veterans don't care to share their stories, yes,
    my uncle is like that and he fought in Vietnam, won't say a word about it, but I asked for people willing to share storis and clearly was not rude about it in any way.

  12. #11
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    Fitz - no, you were not rude so no real prob' there.

    However what you need to remember perhaps is that it is a sensitive subject for so many - bit like asking for someone's innermost secrets. Therefore, even if someone does not wish to tell, they may sometimes respond to say, in effect - ''none of your business''.

    Not really meaning to get at you and the question as much as reacting to a slight feeling of privacy intrusion - as I see it. I will admit, even in old age - I too like to hear vets recount episodes in their service time - not for macabre reasons, more to better understand what hell and high water they went thru - the horrors they saw. The better to empathize maybe.

    Forget who mentioned just in last day or two - but re a vet of IIRC Nam or maybe even Korea - asking whether they had had nightmares. The old guy said ''yes, another last night''. For many the images will not ever fade and go away and for many too relating them is not cathartic - rather, a too painful reinforcement of something they'd dearly like to forget.

    Don't be too harsh if some folks ''prickle'' You would not feel disrespectful asking perhaps but because of the feeling of intrusion it might be perceived as such sometimes.
    Chris - P95
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    Member Array fitznig's Avatar
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    aw, that is true!
    GOD bless every soilder, they are brave brave people to work under such harsh conditions.

  14. #13
    VIP Member Array Bud White's Avatar
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    My grandfather who was on a destroyer died when my dad was 18 of triple heart attack so almost no story's there ..
    The one dad remembers is him talking about Kamikaze planes and how it scared the living crap out of him trying TO hit a plane with a 16inch gun would be pretty wild i would say

    He told dad he would rather go against bombers and other destroyer type ships than face the Kamikazes

    My dads brother was in Nam and wont talk about it to much all dad would say was he could understand why when he snuck down and say the papers for what his brother received Medals for..

    I would like to hear the story's but alias not and i wont ask but i do thank every current and former member of the Armed forces for there service

  15. #14
    Member Array RobL's Avatar
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    My dad was on the O' Bannon, a Fletcher Class destroyer.
    He served in the mid 50's.
    It was famous for taking out a Jap sub during WWII with a barage of potatoes.
    The cooks and sailors were peeling spuds when the sub surfaced right next to the O'Bannon, Japaneze sailors scrambled out to man the deck guns. The O'Bannon was too close to depress her 5" guns. The cooks threw spuds at the Jap sailors and kept them from firing their deck gun while the rest of the crew were able to break out machine guns and manuver away enough to use the 5" main gun, sinking the Japanese sub.
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  16. #15
    Senior Member Array GoodSamaritan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobL
    My dad was on the O' Bannon, a Fletcher Class destroyer.
    He served in the mid 50's.
    It was famous for taking out a Jap sub during WWII with a barage of potatoes.
    The cooks and sailors were peeling spuds when the sub surfaced right next to the O'Bannon, Japaneze sailors scrambled out to man the deck guns. The O'Bannon was too close to depress her 5" guns. The cooks threw spuds at the Jap sailors and kept them from firing their deck gun while the rest of the crew were able to break out machine guns and manuver away enough to use the 5" main gun, sinking the Japanese sub.
    rofl!!!

    Not funny at the time I am sure, but definately entertaining now. I'll have to look this one up.

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