Nerve / Wound pain, long term help????

Nerve / Wound pain, long term help????

This is a discussion on Nerve / Wound pain, long term help???? within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; I tapping into the wonderfully diverse group of people we have here on this forum. Anyone have experience with dealing with the lingering pain associated ...

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Thread: Nerve / Wound pain, long term help????

  1. #1
    Distinguished Member Array 4my sons's Avatar
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    Nerve / Wound pain, long term help????

    I tapping into the wonderfully diverse group of people we have here on this forum.

    Anyone have experience with dealing with the lingering pain associated with tearing type wounds to the skin. In this case a dog bite. My wife was bit last fall and is still experiencing "flair ups" of pain around the wound site. It's on her arm, when the flair up occur, the area turns pink/red. She has had 7 nerve block procedures already performed. They inject a pain agent into her neck just below her throat. That has worked pretty well to help the constant "super sensitivity" to touch, and lessened the severity of flair ups. The next step if this fails to have long term effects, is to have a device implanted in her back. This option would have many trial and error attempts to locate the proper area before the actual implant.

    The Dr. she has been seeing is rated as one of Richmond's top Dr's, so we are pretty confident with his work.

    The question I am posing, is if anyone here has been through these or similar procedures, and what was the long term effect. The only thing I have to gauge against this is a surgical scar that is still numb 10 years later. But that was a surgical cut, not a biting tare. Their was no deep tissue damage, other than some muscle atrifie (spelling) that has caused the wound area to appear sunken in slightly.

    With all our Military, EMT, and Dr.s on here. I'm hoping someone will have some advice, or can share a similar experience.

    Again: It was a dog bite, tearing of the skin on her arm, no deep tissue damage.


    Thanks in advance.
    "fundamental principle of American law that a government and its agents are under no general duty to provide public services, such as police protection, to any individual citizen." [Warren v. District of Columbia,(D.C. Ct. of Ap., 1981)]
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  2. #2
    Member Array George Hill's Avatar
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    I have injuries from over a decade ago that still hurt.

  3. #3
    Distinguished Member Array Stetson's Avatar
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    Sounds like she may be dealing with nerve pain.You may want to ask
    your Doc for drug called topomax it helps for burning,numbing,
    tingiling and anything to do with nerve type pain.It's given in conjuction
    to pain medication with good results.I been taking it for two years
    now with no bad side effects. I am not a doctor just a fusion case
    facing another operation that this medication has allowed me to keep working.

  4. #4
    Distinguished Member Array jarhead79's Avatar
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    This is my opinion on scars. Scars are flammatory tissue. They will irritate the heck out of you for a looong time. By them being flammatory, I an going to assume that they have had her on anti-inflammatories. NSAIDS (Non-sterroidal anti inflammatory drugs) are drugs like Ibuprofen, Naprosen, etc. These cannote be considered effective as a pain reliever. They are designed to be regimened. She must take them consistently and evenly throughout the day and continue for a period of time. This is where many people fall short on their use. They take them when there's pain and that just won't cut it. She must be on them for a good period of time for their maximum effect. When used properly, they will aid in the healing of the area and not just help the symptoms (pain).

    Now, the device in her back. I had some conversations about these as well. They are like a miracle. They "confuse" the nerves/brain with electrical pulses set at just the right frequency. One problem I forsee is their having to find the sweet spot. Surgery is only "controlled tissue damage" It will leave more SCARS and scar tissue. These will also have a similar effect on her body. I had my appendix out when I was an adolescent and another surgery 18 months ago. I can attest that they take a good while to heal. My latest is still a little off. IF she opts to have these procedures done, she will probably not be satisfied with the results unless they get it right the very first time. If they do it more than once, she'll probably give up.

    Now my non-medical (meaning I'm not a doctor, nor have I played one on TV) is, if she hasn't had consistent NSAID treatment, to do this. It's REAL hard to make yourself take drugs if you don't have pain at that time; real easy to forget. Time will make the tingly stuff go away naturally. Numbness will always be present "on" the scars, as there are no nerves in scar tissue.

    Being that she only has flare-ups, I feel that NSAIDs will alleviate them altogether. Maybe 200 mg of IB 3 times a day (not a prescription, I'm not a Dr.) CONSISTENTLY. Try for a month and if it's not working and she HAS taken them consistently, then consider the other options.

    Now, so you don't just think I'm blowing alot of hot air, I'll give you my background on how I know this. (that's alot to make up, BTW)

    I had epididymitis beginning Easter 3 years ago. (if you want to know what it is, look it up, it's kinda graphic) It was chronic for about 2 years. NSAIDS didn't help. I had the Sterroid injections to that area, they only helped until the anesthetic wore off. I opted for a surgery that twice more likely to be unsuccessful than successful. It worked out in my favor, thankfully. I still have very acute pain, but it's muuuuchh better. So, 2 years of treating chronic pain in that area, I learned a little.

    I also have pretty bad shin splints whenever I run routinely (which is one reason I don't anymore).

    Not once (except after surgery) did I ever go on narcotic pain relievers.
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    Post Yes, ~ This Might Help

    Ask your doctor to let her try Neurontin.

    It's specifically intended for Nerve Pain.

    I think it's mostly prescribed for shingles type nerve pain.

    My wife took it for a few months for severe nerve pain caused by a damaged nerve following a whiplash injury & it really helped with no noticeable side effects except that it made her sleepy.

    It sure is worth a try.

  6. #6
    VIP Member Array Bud White's Avatar
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    Only thing i can add is to make sure as stated above she is spot on with her meds or they wont work has to keep build up in here system

    Im not sure i woudl let anyone fool with my back

  7. #7
    Distinguished Member Array 4my sons's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone for your reply's, We'll check into these,

    QK, she also tried the Neurontin with the same effect, Sleepy, but hers was so bad, she couldn't work. She had to stop that one.

    Thanks again for the info. Were hoping it stays in the tolorable range. it's not been a week since the last nerve block, so too early to tell how it will be weeks / months from now.

    Thanks again for the help.
    "fundamental principle of American law that a government and its agents are under no general duty to provide public services, such as police protection, to any individual citizen." [Warren v. District of Columbia,(D.C. Ct. of Ap., 1981)]
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    Mike - so the area turns pink/red with a flair-up.

    This is suggestive to me of some sort of peripheral neuropathy - due to nerve end damage at the time not having fully resolved - it is neurologically ''facilitated'' - meaning it is too ''switched on''. Bit like an itch but 100 times more so!

    I think the redness effect is something like a release of histamine (and 5HT - 5 hydroxytriptamine) - so inflammatory, but not bacteriological inflammatory - almost akin to an immune response. Effect like nettle rash.

    After all that waffle I think pain management is only real way to go and hoping over time it will gradually back off. Mind you, a brachial plexus type injection as it seems has been done, is a pretty major measure anyways. Just maybe (and forget implant crap!) - a ''TENS'' unit, the type that you wear on belt - could assist also if tuned to suit.

    Not much help - just thinkin' aloud really.
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  9. #9
    Distinguished Member Array 4my sons's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by P95Carry
    Mike - so the area turns pink/red with a flair-up.

    This is suggestive to me of some sort of peripheral neuropathy - due to nerve end damage at the time not having fully resolved - it is neurologically ''facilitated'' - meaning it is too ''switched on''. Bit like an itch but 100 times more so!

    I think the redness effect is something like a release of histamine (and 5HT - 5 hydroxytriptamine) - so inflammatory, but not bacteriological inflammatory - almost akin to an immune response. Effect like nettle rash.

    After all that waffle I think pain management is only real way to go and hoping over time it will gradually back off. Mind you, a brachial plexus type injection as it seems has been done, is a pretty major measure anyways. Just maybe (and forget implant crap!) - a ''TENS'' unit, the type that you wear on belt - could assist also if tuned to suit.

    Not much help - just thinkin' aloud really.
    Geeeez, Chris.

    How many hats do you have on that rack over in the corner by the door.

    Thanks for the info. That sounds in Dr. speak, like some of what I couldn't remember how to describe.

    Every bit helps. Thanks for the insight.

    What do you know about Pediatrics?
    "fundamental principle of American law that a government and its agents are under no general duty to provide public services, such as police protection, to any individual citizen." [Warren v. District of Columbia,(D.C. Ct. of Ap., 1981)]
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    VIP Member Array Rob72's Avatar
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    Yeah, with Chris, she probably is having a histamine reaction, exacerbating the usual healing "twinges". OTC, you can try a Benadryl. Try pediatric doses(12.5mg), if she finds 25-50mg too much, along with (personal recommendation) acetaminohen. If she has a history of an over-active immune response (flushing/splotches with excitement or stress/embarrassment; extreme difficulty with allergies; asthma; unusually strong response to any environmental allergen), ibuprofen and asprin may make the response worse.

    I work neurology research, and we do have some "miracles" in and coming down the pike, but I would be hesitant to pursue surgery, until everything else is well explored. Neuro stimulation/interruption is frequently (though not always) a one-shot deal: if you don't get it where you need it, there may be too much displacement/irritation to move the device, in addition to it being another surgery with the inherent infection risks.

    If she can try Topamax, she may like it- it has a strong history of inducing acidosis. The Adkins diet without the dieting!

    My inclination would be to get a good neurologist, pain-management specialist, and possibly allergist together to evaluate (you don't say what type of Dr. she is seeing).

  11. #11
    Distinguished Member Array fotomaker57's Avatar
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    I am going to be in surgery tomorrow assisting with the implantation of two of those pain simulators. We are seeing mixed results. Some people swear by them and others say no change. What we are doing here is putting in a trial unit for two weeks. If the patient has good results we implant a permanent unit. It sounds like she has exhausted all other options. I hope she can find relief some how. Good luck and God Bless
    Mike
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    Closed Account Array Steelhorse's Avatar
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    You may be trying TOO hard

    Pain is a very subjective thing.

    The idea is to use those drugs and/or procedures that work for her.

    After working as a Hospice nurse for as long as I have, I realize that one has to try varied things in layers of application.

    Everyday example: Tylenol works differently than Motrin, so one does not have to wait 8 hours between alternating doses of these drugs.....you can safely take one and then the other every 4 hours.

    I would suggest a diverse regimen of systemic and localized applications under the supervision of a good pain management physician, instead of relying on merely one course of action.

    1. Lidoderm patches, heat/cold, icy hot, etc. applied over the area may help if indicated.
    2. Plexing (stimulating) nerve bundles higher up toward the central nerve system from the site of injury.
    3. Accupuncture is an effective means of pain relief, but many insurance carriers will not cover the regimen. Many Doctors will adjust their professional services fees for those who cannot afford the full fee or copay.
    4. Homeopathic medicine is a very good and inexpensive means for pain treatment.
    5. Physical and Occupational therapies may help with the rebuilding of the body's physical and physiological pain responses.

    There are literally hundreds of therapies to try. Don't give up.....stay with what works.

  13. #13
    Distinguished Member Array jarhead79's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike_1
    I am going to be in surgery tomorrow assisting with the implantation of two of those pain simulators. We are seeing mixed results. Some people swear by them and others say no change. What we are doing here is putting in a trial unit for two weeks. If the patient has good results we implant a permanent unit. It sounds like she has exhausted all other options. I hope she can find relief some how. Good luck and God Bless
    Mike
    That struck a memory that my doc mentioned. He said there is a way to try them externally and if they work, they'll implant them. Something like what he said
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    Senior Member Array Rugerman's Avatar
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    Wow all these big words, I too have chronic pain from a broken back and degenerative disk disease I am currently going through epodural treatments. I know how hard it is on the whole family when someone is in constant pain. I hope you find her some relief. All I can offer is to place her and you on my daily prayer list. Good luck and God bless
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  15. #15
    Senior Member Array tanksoldier's Avatar
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    I've had nerve pain ever since my spine fusion last August.

    Narcotics like vicodin and percocet took the edge off, but not enough for me to sleep, and you can't go around doped up on meds for the rest of your life. Neurotin didn't even put a dent in the remaining pain. I didn't notice any difference at all.

    I just had to wait until I was so exausted that I slept in spite of the pain. Now it's just annoying, with occasional flarups like now... I'm posting this at 0105 hrs. :)
    "I am a Soldier. I fight where I am told, and I win where I fight." GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

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