Review: LaserLyte LT-Pro, "Pistol Laser Trainer"

Review: LaserLyte LT-Pro, "Pistol Laser Trainer"

This is a discussion on Review: LaserLyte LT-Pro, "Pistol Laser Trainer" within the Related Gear & Equipment forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; A personal review of the LaserLyte LT-Pro "Pistol Laser Trainer". WHAT IS IT? This device is a red laser that fits into the muzzle of ...

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  1. #1
    Member Array mfcmb's Avatar
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    Review: LaserLyte LT-Pro, "Pistol Laser Trainer"

    A personal review of the LaserLyte LT-Pro "Pistol Laser Trainer".

    WHAT IS IT?
    This device is a red laser that fits into the muzzle of a pistol and that turns on for about a tenth of a second whenever the hammer or striker is released. It's purpose is to help you improve your aim during dry-fire practice by showing you exactly where the gun is pointing when you pull the trigger.

    TO USE IT
    (1) Unload your pistol, (2) Insert batteries into the trainer, (2) Adjust the black plastic collet at the rear end of the trainer so that it press-fits into the muzzle of your pistol, (3) slide the trainer into the muzzle until the cone-shaped front end of the trainer is snug against the muzzle, (4) cock your pistol, (5) pull the trigger. When the trainer "hears" the snap of the hammer or striker, it will flash the laser for a tenth of a second.

    BENEFITS
    (1) Once installed, the trainer only extends about 1/4 inch from the muzzle, so you should be able to use it with any holster and in active training scenarios.

    (2) The trainer can be adjusted to fit a wide variety of popular calibers, from appoximately 9mm to .45ACP.

    (3) Since it's mounted directly in the barrel there is no parallax; thus it accurately shows point of aim at all distances.


    COSTS
    (1) The list price of the trainer is $99.99, but I got mine for $83.92 with shipping from Midway.

    (2) The instructions say the batteries will last for 3,000 flashes, but note that (with a semi-automatic) the trainer will flash once when you rack the slide back, once again when you release the slide, and finally when you pull the trigger during practice. I haven't counted how many times I pull the trigger during practice, but I seem to get about five days worth of practice out of each set of batteries.

    (3) By careful shopping on the internet you should be able to buy batteries rather cheaply. For example, in my last purchase (as of Feb-2010) I got 100 Sony-brand batteries for $24 + $3.95 shipping = $0.28 per battery. The batteries you need are #377 silver oxide watch batteries (equivalent to SR626SW).


    MISC. COMMENTS
    (1) The trainer draws power from the batteries continuously. They will run down overnight if you leave them in. So at the end of each practice session you should unscrew the back end of the trainer and leave it off. This disconnects the batteries (and also leaves them exposed and able to fall out). I'm thinking of drilling some holes in a block of wood that will hold both halves of the trainer upright (like a little pencil stand).

    (2) After inserting batteries, screw the two halves of the trainer together snugly -- otherwise the trainer doesn't reliably sense the snap of the hammer or striker.

    (3) Make sure the black plastic collet is adjusted to get a firm press-fit into the barrel; otherwise the trainer can come out of the barrel during practice.

    (4) "Pistol" in some contexts refers to any handgun, and in others only to semi-automatic handguns. The pictures in the trainer's instructions only show semi-automatic handguns, and I've only used it with such, so I don't know if it will work with revolvers.

    (5) The body of the trainer is well made of machined aluminium with a hard finish (it looks like anodizing).

    (6) Where the cone-shape front end of the trainer rests against the crown of the gun barrel the red finish chips off, leaving a silver ring of bare aluminum circling the trainer. I doubt that this has any effect on the function or accuracy of the trainer, but I wonder whether it can be damaging to the crown.

    (7) To adjust the trainer for different caliber barrels, you screw the black plastic collet progressivly further against the conical rear end of trainer's metal body (they supply a tiny allen wrench for this purpose). This progressively forces the arms of the collet to expand. The collet is of a fairly soft plastic (nylon?). On my unit, the screw bottomed out before the arms splayed widely enough to fit a .45ACP barrel. Fortunately I found an approximately 1/16 inch long spacer in my hardware collection that I could place between the screw head and the rear end of the collet, thereby shortening the effective length of the screw, and allowing me to screw the collet down far enough to make it expand to fit my .45ACP barrel.
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    In the heat of the moment, what matters is what your body knows -- not what your mind knows.


  2. #2
    Member Array OldLincoln's Avatar
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    >> (3) Since it's mounted directly in the barrel there is no parallax; thus it accurately shows point of aim at all distances.<<

    In daylight, how is visibility of the laser dot at 20' against walls, furniture, etc.?

    Is the flash timing long enough to find the dot?

  3. #3
    Member Array mfcmb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldLincoln View Post
    In daylight, how is visibility of the laser dot at 20' against walls, furniture, etc.?

    Is the flash timing long enough to find the dot?
    Indoors it's bright. Outdoors in bright sunlight it's invisible. In open shade outdoors it's dim. Twilight outdoors, it's bright.

    Yes, the flash lasts long enough to find the dot, AND to show how much my aim is wiggling immediately after pulling the trigger.
    In the heat of the moment, what matters is what your body knows -- not what your mind knows.

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