Medical/Survival Kits

This is a discussion on Medical/Survival Kits within the Related Gear & Equipment forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; For the last couple of weeks I have been very interested in your basic survival from everything to a simple household accident to the fall ...

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Thread: Medical/Survival Kits

  1. #1
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    Medical/Survival Kits

    For the last couple of weeks I have been very interested in your basic survival from everything to a simple household accident to the fall of society as we know it.

    I'm wanting to start collecting supplies starting from the most reasonable (most likely to happen) to the least reasonable and SHTF type situations.

    Being good parents and me being the product of a nurse as my mother, we have plenty of every-day first aide supplies and kits including basic first aide kits in both cars and loads of supplies in the medicine cabinet.

    However, these would not be good enough for severe trauma such as a gun shot or severe accident.

    I've added emergency thermal blankets to the diaper bag as it's getting very cold outside and wherever I am, my son is, and wherever my son is there is the diaper bag. If there is an emergency we can stay warm.

    I'm thinking of getting a gun shot wound kit for my range bag. I end up alone at the range a lot and in the event of a very unforeseeable accident I would hate to bleed to death by myself when I could have had options. Not to mention it would be with me for IDPA matches, etc.

    I'm also planning on taking an EMS course at the local community college. You can't be too "learned" on this kind of stuff.

    Next I'm considering long term loss of utilities at home.. water, food, heat, etc.

    Then a total collapse of society...
    We already have a place to go but it would take some traveling.

    Roads and travel might be hard so it may be necessary to backpack it at least part of the way.

    I'm looking at land navigation kits (JD has some land nav training from his Corps days but it would be a big help to learn myself) and the essential gear to get a family of three about 200 miles in any kind of weather with a worst case scenario of it being on foot.

    I've been googling and bookmarking kits and articles for a couple of days now and got some good ideas of things I want to start stock-piling.

    Any suggestions for one or all of the categories listed above?
    What do you have and why do you have it?
    Did you buy your survival kit pre-prepared or make it yourself?
    What's essential and what's just fluff?

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  3. #2
    VIP Member Array jwhite75's Avatar
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    http://www.lapolicegear.com/adventure-first-aid-2.html

    http://www.lapolicegear.com/amk-trauma-pak.html

    These are both a good start for very little money. I answered on your Facebook page also. I am a former EMT, and I think an EMS course is a great thing to take. I have added stuff to my kit in my "get me home/BOB". OTC stuff, like additional gauze, bandaids, anti diarrheals, burn gels, sanitizing wipes, pain relievers, etc. There are some of these things in the pre made kits but it is always nice to have extras of some things.

    I currently use an Adventure Medical Kits 0.9 with additonal stuff. I like them because they have waterproof sacks for storage.

    I also recommend a tactical tourniquet that can be operated one handed.
    http://www.chinookmed.com/cgi-bin/ca...source=froogle


    I recommend checking out a show on Outdoor Channel, called Best Defense: Survival. Very Informative.

    I also recommend checking out www.edcforums.com. I have learned so much about kits and everyday usage stuff like First Aid Kits there.
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    Not 100% on target for your request, when I lived in Ames I always kept a shovel, blankets, candles (they give off heat inside a closed car) and plenty of high calorie stuff like candy bars and marshmallow in the trunk. I also kept tire chains. My greatest concern was getting trapped for several hours or even days during and after a blizzard.

    Beyond making sure you have it all covered in case you are caught in a snow storm while driving, you should of course have an alternate heat source in your house-- e.g. kerosene heater, propane heater with enough capacity and designed for indoor use, and enough fuel on hand to last (depending on where you live) a few days.

    As for first aid and stuff, most of the time if you can't solve a problem with pressure bandages or ordinary braces/splints, you are in deep doo. You can't really handle shock on your own and it is shock that will be the biggest danger other than bleed out.

    You might want to talk to a doc about letting you keep some prednisone (or similar) on hand. IT will help with treating shock. Similarly, you might be able to arrange to keep some Vicodin on hand for the same reason, to treat pain and shock. Likely no doc will want to help you out with this part because it possibly goes against one rule or another, but if you can get them they are good to have on hand.

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    VIP Member Array NC Bullseye's Avatar
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    You may laugh but for a first aid kit that you may be using by yourself, a pocket mirror is a handy thing since we humans don't normally have the capability to rotate our heads 180 degrees. A back injure of the puncture or serious cut variety whether gun shot, or fall in the woods is hard to fix when you can see it.

  6. #5
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    The alternate heat source for the house is a big thing around here. I've been wanting to get a good kerosene heater for some time. You never think about those things during the summer but once it starts getting cold you get awoken to how cold it can really get.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hopyard View Post
    You might want to talk to a doc about letting you keep some prednisone (or similar) on hand. IT will help with treating shock. Similarly, you might be able to arrange to keep some Vicodin on hand for the same reason, to treat pain and shock. Likely no doc will want to help you out with this part because it possibly goes against one rule or another, but if you can get them they are good to have on hand.
    I've come across a lot of articles advocating the storage of prescription antibiotics, pain medication and the like and I always think, "How the HECK are these people getting these drugs?" Can't a doctor lose his license for writing non-medical prescriptions?

    I mean, I know that I wouldn't abuse them but a doctor doesn't know that (unless we are old family friends or something).. Still seems risky for the doctor, legally.

    It seems like a fabulous idea to store medication for an emergency but the ability and legality of obtaining said medication is what has me scratching my head.

  7. #6
    VIP Member Array jwhite75's Avatar
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    For a alternate heater, I would look in to wood pellet stoves. they are excellent and much cleaner than a wood bruning stove. In the event of a power outage, they can be hooked to a car battery to operate the blowers and electricals.

    I like NC Bullseye's idea so much I prob will get one myself, to have in my kit.
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    EMT training is really valuable for just about anybody. My husband has had it and I've had an roughly equivalent course in hours and content for National Ski Patrol (more broken bones, less childbirth!). I'm sure you would enjoy it.

    My home stock for emergencies includes small bottles of bleach, as well as the usual non-cooked items (SPAM, canned soup, tuna, beans, etc). I also have plenty of Tang type powdered drink mix in the event that water is bad tasting but ok to drink. A few big boxes of teabags for the same reason. A few extra boxes of salt, big bottles of vinegar - those are cheap and have many uses.

    We also have plenty of alcohol, in an emergency I figure that could be used as barter tender. There are always a couple of extra big Costco bottles of multi vitamins.

    First aid stuff on hand is all the usual stuff in my husbands trauma kit, and I have the NSP ski vest packed with stuff. I like to have plenty of 4x4 gauze and wrapping tape. Magnifying glasses, big ones. Benedryl and Epi pens.

    We like to have plenty of those hand warmers and footpad warmers around. You can get them on Sierra Traders for a good price.

    Beeswax candles, big pillars. They don't foul the air like other candles. Having said that, the ones from the grocery store for about 1.99 with Jesus on the front burn forever, and I have plenty of those too.

    I read with interest that Pop Tarts were in the emergency food to the cruise ship. They must have a long shelf life, and hey who would not like a Pop Tart when the chips are down. I am going to get some to add to my stash.

    Good topic. There has been a lot posted on "bug out bags", my mindset is more "stay put stuff and defend the perimeter".

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    Absolutely add Myclyns Germ Protection Spray.
    Protection from contaminated body fluids in the eyes, nose, mouth. Safe for spraying in the eyes.
    Especially every LEO should have/carry one.

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    I looked and found a LOT of kits were over supplied, or under supplied. I bought a orange medic bag from e-bay and filled it with what I needed.

  11. #10
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    Some thoughts:

    (1) The book "Medicine for Mountaineering" by James Wilkerson is an excellent reference book for how to handle the wide range of medical issues that can occur away from civilization.

    (2) It's been ages since I was a boy scout, but as I recall "The Boy Scout Handbook" was an excellent compendium for developing self-reliance skills: how to find your way with map and compass (or without), basic first aid, basic knots and how to use them, constructing shelters, fires, etc.

    (3) I like to develop location-based kits that are tuned to what can happen in that location. For example: only my car kit has jumper cables, my shooting kit has a a blood-stopper or QuickClot bandage, my diaper bag (when my kids where that age) had band aids and Neosporin and powdered formula and a disposable bottle. My house doesn't have a "kit" per se, but I've got all the things we'd need for short term problems: land and shovels for an outdoor latrine, camp stove and white gas for cooking, a rotating stock of canned and preserved foods, flashlights and batteries, candles, a 60 gallon water heater (a reservoir of potable water), etc. I have chosen not to prepare for the end of the world.

    (4) One of the big problems with extensive preparedness is that lots of things (medicines, hand lotions, canned food, gasoline, batteries, etc.) have shelf lives. It's relatively easy to make one enormous trip to the survival store and get everything you need, but then maintaining currency on all the perishables can take a lot of time and effort. I prefer to have these things scattered through the house, to be using them up over time, to rotate my stock, and to keep enough on hand that I only have to restock any one item only every few weeks or months. If I ever have to abandon the house I'll have to pull things together from all over the house & garage, but little or nothing will be expired.

    (5) It's useful to learn to think creatively about what the things around you are capable of, not simply in terms of what they're labeled. A classic example is the screwdriver, which can be used as an awl, a prybar, a chisel, a weapon, etc. Less obvious are things like realizing you can bring your solar powered garden lights indoors at night instead of using candles. The Boy Scout motto "be prepared" means not only have a bunch of stuff in inventory, but also know how to use the things around you in creative and makeshift ways.

    Good luck. Have fun!
    In the heat of the moment, what matters is what your body knows -- not what your mind knows.

  12. #11
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    For the range I bought a small trauma kit in a red MOLLE bag (with red cross on it) that I attach to my shoulder strap. I then added a couple of QuickClots, an Israeli bandage and a tourniquet. I chose the red and made sure it was mounted outside my range bag for quick access and it's obvious to others what it is just in case I'm not around or am the one who need to be treated.

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    Quote Originally Posted by limatunes View Post
    The alternate heat source for the house is a big thing around here. I've been wanting to get a good kerosene heater for some time. You never think about those things during the summer but once it starts getting cold you get awoken to how cold it can really get.
    There are also some good relatively inexpensive safe for indoors propane heaters to be had. You just need to keep a couple of 20 lb cylinders hand instead of kerosene.

    Lima wrote: "I've come across a lot of articles advocating the storage of prescription antibiotics, pain medication and the like and I always think, "How the HECK are these people getting these drugs?" Can't a doctor lose his license for writing non-medical prescriptions?"

    I don't know what leeway the docs have if any. Ask your doc. If you have a regular one with a decent enough long term relationship they can possibly help you out.

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    Remember that prescription meds must be in the bottle WITH the label (matching the contents) on the bottle and the prescription must be for you or a family member/spouse/child/parent.

    If you have a good, close, relationship with your family Doctor and you are honest about wanting an Emergency SHTF antibiotic, etc. - he or she can help you out with that.

    And you can also blow out your lower back and don't take your prescribed pain med...& sock that away and suffer a bit more with ADVIL.

    If you know a Dentist - a Dentist can also do you a SHTF antibiotic.

  15. #14
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    I carry a water purification straw in my get home bag, as well as a few fire starting items, a first aid kit , emergency blanket and other assorted goodies. Of course you need have some knowledge of the items you choose. I tend to take at least 1-2 trips a year camping from a small to medium pack and little gear, practicing my woodcraft skills.
    Granted this is harder with a small child, however wilderness camping can be fun with kids. I always had fun teaching my kids how to build fires, lean tos and such. They grew up appreciating nature and comfortable sleeping in the woods.
    "In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock." Thomas Jefferson


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    Senior Member Array HK Dan's Avatar
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    16 drops of unscented bleach to a gallon of water makes it potable. Bleach. It's a good thing.

    I have a Unit 1 bag and a small personal kit. A friend is an EMT and he warned against Quik Clot. Evidently it makes future treatment MUCH more difficult.
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