Purchasing used Level 2 vests >>>

This is a discussion on Purchasing used Level 2 vests >>> within the Related Gear & Equipment forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I was at a local show yesterday and saw a dealer selling some used Level 2 vests for $75. He says that these are turn-ins ...

Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Purchasing used Level 2 vests >>>

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array VBVAGUY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    1,176

    Purchasing used Level 2 vests >>>

    I was at a local show yesterday and saw a dealer selling some used Level 2 vests for $75. He says that these are turn-ins and that some of them actually look unused. Of course he does not guarantee anything. Would these be worth it to get for $75 ?? Thanks for you opinions. God Bless

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #2
    Moderator
    Array buckeye .45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    7,666
    Kevlar and other ballistic materials are pretty susceptible to a number of factors that degrade them over time. UV light, dirt, improper storage can all damage the fibers and degrade the performance.

    If it actually looks unused, it might be ok, depending on how it was stored.

    But of course, the only way to really test is by trying it.

    I'd reccomend level III or IIIA as a minimum, but that is just me.
    Fortes Fortuna Juvat

    Former, USMC 0311, OIF/OEF vet
    NRA Pistol/Rifle/Shotgun/Reloading Instructor, RSO, Ohio CHL Instructor

  4. #3
    VIP Member Array mcp1810's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    4,959
    If they are properly cared for they should be fine.
    In 2006 I gave a friend an old vest of mine. It was a Level II manufactured back in the late 1980's. It still stopped 230grain ball .45 ACP and 124grain 9mm ball just fine.
    The down side is the only way to be absolutely sure you are getting the protection you believe you are paying for without shooting it up is to buy new.
    Infowars- Proving David Hannum right on a daily basis

  5. #4
    Administrator
    Array QKShooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Off Of The X
    Posts
    35,296
    Add a Kevlar soft trauma insert over the heart area.
    Shop around & thhat will bring yours up to a III or IIIA over your pumper.

    There are a glut of them on Ebay right now.
    http://cgi.ebay.com/NEW-PACA-5x8-SOF...item2560bccb2b

  6. #5
    VIP Member
    Array OPFOR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Nomad
    Posts
    4,713
    Just a note: Level III is rated to stop (a good amount of) rifle fire - it is not typically found in "soft" armors. The highest rating for standard "soft" armor is IIIA.
    A man fires a rifle for many years, and he goes to war. And afterward he turns the rifle in at the armory, and he believes he's finished with the rifle. But no matter what else he might do with his hands - love a woman, build a house, change his son's diaper - his hands remember the rifle.

  7. #6
    Distinguished Member Array Bob The Great's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Slidell, LA
    Posts
    1,688
    Personally, I would only buy a used turn-in vest for use as a range day target or an airsoft training aid. As buckeye pointed out, you don't know the history of the armor panels or what kind of "oops" moments they may have endured. Any given vest may be fine or it may give you a false sense of security until you need it to perform. Worse, having an old turn-in vest kicking around your closet may delay/prevent a future purchase of new and dependable armor. After all, you already have this "perfectly good" used one.

    Being level II vests is another negative mark in my opinion, even though when new they should be able to stop most handgun rounds you might encounter from a bad guy. IIIA vests are readily available, and can be very light and thin. Unless I had no other options, I would go for the highest level of soft armor I could get, just on the off chance that a home invader happens to be carrying a dirty harry .44.

    So, all that being said, $75 is a pretty good price for a lightly used vest, and I'd probably go ahead and buy one or two for targets and training aids. But only if you treat them as such, and purchase new armor as well. Galls has clearance vests pop up now and then that are very good deals. I've picked up two IIIA vests from them over the last couple of years, both for well under half of what they would normally go for, and both were brand new.

    As far as adding trauma pads, they're a good idea to have, but I'm pretty sure the trauma pad inserts don't improve the ballistic performance of the vest at all. They are there to "soften the punch" of a bullet being stopped, but I haven't seen any that will actually stop a projectile that makes it through the main armor panel. Certainly, no soft trauma pad is going to offer level III protection against rifle threats. Now, there are soft armor backing panels that are designed to be used in conjunction with level III or IV hard plates, and some plates require backing panels to meet their advertised ratings, but that's very different than a trauma pad.
    "A well-educated electorate, being necessary to the continuance of a free state, the right of the people to keep and read books shall not be infringed."
    Is this hard to understand? Then why does it get unintelligible to some people when 5 little words are changed?

  8. #7
    Administrator
    Array QKShooter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Off Of The X
    Posts
    35,296
    Actually adding a soft trauma insert will increase the effectiveness of the vest immediately over the vital area since a soft trauma plate is in actuality another layered vest but, just packaged in a smaller housing.
    Since each additional layer that a bullet impacts takes away a portion of its impact energy (which is absorbed and dispersed to successive layers of the vest) until the bullet mushrooms & is actually stopped.
    It is the energy required to effect the deformation of the fibers that prevents the bullet from penetrating the vest so logically doubling the number of layers of Level II would be more effective than not having the insert at all.

    Naturally...we are not talking "ideal" here but only better and more effective than a $75.00 Level II vest of questionable provenance having its effectiveness increased by adding a new trauma insert of known provenance.

    It should be noted here that we are beginning this situation with something that is less than ideal & that there is always some very real & inherent risk in purchasing any used BPV.
    I CAN understand how somebody that just wants some possible protection over "no protection at all" would shop around for a used vest over spending many hundreds of dollars for a new vest of known provenance.
    There are some decent deals to be had out there if you know what to look for and what to watch out for.

    Absolutely every LEO should have new and currant issue body armor.

  9. #8
    VIP Member Array jwhite75's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    5,319
    I would much rather check out ome place like www.bulletproofme.com and watch for a deal and possibly spend a little money if I were using it for personal use.
    Friends don't let friends be MALL NINJAS.


    I am just as nice as anyone lets me be and can be just as mean as anyone makes me. - Quoted from Terryger, New member to our forum.

  10. #9
    Senior Member Array VBVAGUY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    1,176
    Everyone thanks for the very useful information. I did not purchase the vest, but in the next show if they are offered again I may pick 1 or 2 up *just* to have. I mean for $75..... yeah I can spend a few hundred more and get a new or used Level 3 vest, but right now I just do not have that money and for $75 it would be good for some range fun and maybe as a backup one for *just in case* like in the trunk of a car, etc. God Bless

  11. #10
    VIP Member
    Array OPFOR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Nomad
    Posts
    4,713
    and get a new or used Level 3 vest
    Level IIIA.
    A man fires a rifle for many years, and he goes to war. And afterward he turns the rifle in at the armory, and he believes he's finished with the rifle. But no matter what else he might do with his hands - love a woman, build a house, change his son's diaper - his hands remember the rifle.

  12. #11
    Distinguished Member Array Bob The Great's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Slidell, LA
    Posts
    1,688
    Quote Originally Posted by QKShooter View Post
    Actually adding a soft trauma insert will increase the effectiveness of the vest immediately over the vital area since a soft trauma plate is in actuality another layered vest but, just packaged in a smaller housing.
    Since each additional layer that a bullet impacts takes away a portion of its impact energy (which is absorbed and dispersed to successive layers of the vest) until the bullet mushrooms & is actually stopped.
    It is the energy required to effect the deformation of the fibers that prevents the bullet from penetrating the vest so logically doubling the number of layers of Level II would be more effective than not having the insert at all.
    Hm, interesting line of thought. I guess it would depend on what the pad is made out of. I can see how another layer of aramid could strengthen the vest, but I wouldn't expect the same from a plain dense foam pad. Looks to me like both are available. I learn something new every day.

    http://www.bulletproofme.com/Body_Ar...#Trauma_Plates
    "A well-educated electorate, being necessary to the continuance of a free state, the right of the people to keep and read books shall not be infringed."
    Is this hard to understand? Then why does it get unintelligible to some people when 5 little words are changed?

  13. #12
    Distinguished Member Array Bob The Great's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Slidell, LA
    Posts
    1,688
    Quote Originally Posted by VBVAGUY View Post
    ...maybe as a backup one for *just in case* like in the trunk of a car, etc. God Bless
    Just be aware that leaving a vest in the trunk of your car can give it heat damage on hot summer days, especially if you live in the south. Maybe not a big deal for a range target, but something to think about.
    "A well-educated electorate, being necessary to the continuance of a free state, the right of the people to keep and read books shall not be infringed."
    Is this hard to understand? Then why does it get unintelligible to some people when 5 little words are changed?

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Looking at purchasing a Kimber
    By wrainsberger in forum General Firearm Discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: December 11th, 2008, 01:06 AM
  2. About vests
    By birch143 in forum Related Gear & Equipment
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: July 31st, 2008, 01:29 AM
  3. Age limit on purchasing AK?
    By catfish hunter in forum Defensive Rifles & Shotgun Discussion
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: March 4th, 2007, 06:12 PM
  4. Vests
    By N8R in forum Defensive Carry Holsters & Carry Options
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: March 9th, 2006, 07:33 PM
  5. Speaking of BGs wearing vests, what about GGs wearing bad vests!
    By Tangle in forum Related Gear & Equipment
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: September 27th, 2005, 11:30 PM

Search tags for this page

2a vest

,
does level ii vest stop .45
,
level 2 vest
,

level 2a vest

,
level ii stops 45
,
level ii vest with soft trauma insert enough?
,
two level iiia vests
,
used level2 vest
,
vest ii stop .45?
,
vest level 3 used
,
what will a level 2 vest stop
,
will a level ii vest stop a .45
Click on a term to search for related topics.