Ultimate Night Stand Light?

This is a discussion on Ultimate Night Stand Light? within the Related Gear & Equipment forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by tokerblue A lot of the newer flashlights have multiple modes ranging from just a few lumens to several hundred. My Quark Preon ...

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 31 to 38 of 38
Like Tree5Likes

Thread: Ultimate Night Stand Light?

  1. #31
    Distinguished Member Array DefConGun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    1,670
    Quote Originally Posted by tokerblue View Post
    A lot of the newer flashlights have multiple modes ranging from just a few lumens to several hundred. My Quark Preon 1 runs on a single AAA and can go from Low (1.8 Lumens, 23 hours) to High (70 Lumens, 0.8 hours). Likewise, my Quark 123 can go from Moonlight (0.2 lumens for 15 days) to Max (205 lumens for 0.8 hours)
    Very true. Those sound like some nice lights, I'll check them out as well. Great points. Thanks for sharing. ;-)

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #32
    Distinguished Member Array DefConGun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    1,670
    Quote Originally Posted by TSiWRX View Post
    No, no, I agree completely - the mega-lights do have their use, but indeed, it's the lower output (or variable output), smaller, handier flashlights that typically bear the brunt of the work, for the vast majority of "everyday" uses.

    My C2/KL3/Z48, with an actual-factory-stock (I have another one that was upgraded by a friend of mine ) KL3 head is neither a thrower nor puts out anywhere near an overwhelming amount of light, but it gets used *all the time* in our upstairs bedrooms and bathrooms. It's handy, and with the CR123 primaries, it virtually never runs out of juice.

    Downstairs, it's the same thing. I've got a half-dozen or so of rather powerful flashlights to pick from, just laying around in my study, but the one we use the most is my 5-year-old-daughter's Fenix P2D.

    It's not to say that there's no place for the mega-output lights: just that the "average" ones are typically the most useful workhorses.
    Great points.

    I actually stayed up last night trying to find a good small utility light just so I wouldn't kick myself when I finally break down and buy one....lol.

    I found a NOVATAC 120ST STORM for $42.10;

    Specifications:
    Battery Type: 1 x CR123 Primary Lithium or RCR123
    Light Source: White LED
    Lens: Polycarbonate w/Anti-Reflective Coatings
    Dimensions: 1 inch x 3.3 inches
    Weight: 3.1 Ounces (including battery)
    Waterproof up to 66 Ft.
    Materials: Aerospace Grade Aluminum
    Finish: Type II Hard Anodized
    3 Pre-set brightness levels (120, 30, 0.3 lumens)
    Run Times: 120L/30 min, 30L/4 hr, 0.3L/240 hr

    Package Includes:
    Novatac Storm
    Steel Pocket Clip/ Lanyard Attachment
    1 x CR123A Primary Lithium Battery
    User Guide
    NovaTac 120ST Storm LED Flashlight - Black (120ST-BK)- 120 Lumens - uses 1 x CR123A

    I'm super excited to find this buy. From what I can tell, this is an all USA made light that typically goes for over $50. BladeHQ's website actually has it listed for $75.00 The downside is that due to Irene, shippiing has been delayed to an unknown amount of time. They'll continue to take orders but they don't know when it'll ship.

    Amazon supposedly has this light for $17 & some change but everytime I tried to checkout, it said that the items were out of stock and that I need to find a different seller. When I tried to put in an item from a different vender selling the light for $20+ & some change, I get the same message.

    I'll check back and try to get this light if I can get it for a good price.

    In the mean time, I couldn't hold out any longer and stopped at Wal-Mart this afternoon and got the new Mag-lite Mini. Its the updated version of the light that I can't find. I like it but I hate the switching mechanism. You turn it on the same as you do any Maglite. The first time you turn it on, it is on "high" volume which is 69 lumen. If you turn it off and then back on quickly, it bumps down to the low (15 or so) lumen mode and if you do it again, it will be in a "strobe" mode and yet again one more time, it will be in the "SOS" mode.

    Given that I'll mostly use it in the low setting, I wish the low setting was the first one to come on. Instead, I'll have to twist it twice to get the light to go into the low setting most of the time I want to use it. It doesn't have the 69 lumen setting/capability but I believe I like my old light better. I'm not complaining though, I got the light for $21.88 + tax. If I'm not mistaken, my old light cost significantly more than this newer version. I'm thinking my old light was right around $35?

  4. #33
    VIP Member Array tokerblue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    2,334
    Quote Originally Posted by DefConGun View Post
    The first time you turn it on, it is on "high" volume which is 69 lumen. If you turn it off and then back on quickly, it bumps down to the low (15 or so) lumen mode and if you do it again, it will be in a "strobe" mode and yet again one more time, it will be in the "SOS" mode.

    Given that I'll mostly use it in the low setting, I wish the low setting was the first one to come on. Instead, I'll have to twist it twice to get the light to go into the low setting most of the time I want to use it.
    - That's called the "Twisty" interface. You basically twist the head to change modes. The other popular interface is the "Clicky" interface where you press a button on top of the flashlight to change modes. A lot of newer "tactical" flashlights are "Clicky", but also have different sequences based on the bezel tightness.

    For example, the Quark 123 (Regular) has two distinct sequences.
    Loosened Bezel: Moonlight -> Low -> Medium -> High -> SOS -> Beacon
    Tightened Bezel: Max -> Strobe


    IMO, the lighting sequence and activation is another very important thing to research when buying a light.

  5. #34
    Distinguished Member Array DefConGun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    1,670
    Quote Originally Posted by tokerblue View Post
    - That's called the "Twisty" interface. You basically twist the head to change modes. The other popular interface is the "Clicky" interface where you press a button on top of the flashlight to change modes. A lot of newer "tactical" flashlights are "Clicky", but also have different sequences based on the bezel tightness.

    For example, the Quark 123 (Regular) has two distinct sequences.
    Loosened Bezel: Moonlight -> Low -> Medium -> High -> SOS -> Beacon
    Tightened Bezel: Max -> Strobe


    IMO, the lighting sequence and activation is another very important thing to research when buying a light.
    I couldn't agree more. The activation or interface has alot to do with how you interact with the light and is about as important as the light's output.

    I know what you are talking about when you mentioned the "clicky". My Elzetta has a "clicky" interface and I love it. If the bezel is turned out, I have a on/off mode if I slightly depress the button. If I push the button in further and make it "click", then it is "on". If I twist the bezel slightly, the light jumps into "high" mode. They have the twisty tailcap if you want it but I decided to pay a little more to get the "clicky".

    The twisty is annoying (to me) but considering the low price, I can put up with it. Maybe they'll update this feature and offer a bezel that simply has a hi & lo mode. I really don't care about the extras, i.e. strobe & "SOS".

  6. #35
    VIP Member Array tokerblue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    2,334
    I would also take a look at the Quark Tactical. It's has the same specs as the standard line, but it's programmable, so you can decide what mode the Loosened and Tightened Bezel activate. So if you want Loosened to be Medium and Tightened to be Max, you just program it that way. When you change your mind, you just reprogram it.

  7. #36
    Distinguished Member Array DefConGun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    1,670
    Quote Originally Posted by tokerblue View Post
    I would also take a look at the Quark Tactical. It's has the same specs as the standard line, but it's programmable, so you can decide what mode the Loosened and Tightened Bezel activate. So if you want Loosened to be Medium and Tightened to be Max, you just program it that way. When you change your mind, you just reprogram it.
    That is awesome! Thanks for the heads up. ;-)

  8. #37
    Distinguished Member Array TSiWRX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Cleveland/Shaker Heights, Ohio - USA
    Posts
    1,257
    Quote Originally Posted by tokerblue View Post
    IMO, the lighting sequence and activation is another very important thing to research when buying a light.
    +1.

    Not quite as bad for a general-use light, but if you're looking for a light to be used in emergent/defensive situations, you'll really want something that you can actuate properly, under stress.

    One of the reasons I went for the Surefire Z2S LED was because of how simple and straightforward it is to operate - but again, that light fits a much different role than my household "general use" lights: the Fenix P2D, for example, is a great light to have around-the-house and the garage, because of its different modes of operation, which closely approximates what tokerblue described for the Quark 123.

    Target your intended use of the light as your basis for the research of your purchase. There's lots of good lights out there, but one or the other will better/worse fit any set of intended uses.
    Harryball likes this.

  9. #38
    Distinguished Member Array DefConGun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    1,670
    Quote Originally Posted by TSiWRX View Post
    +1.

    Not quite as bad for a general-use light, but if you're looking for a light to be used in emergent/defensive situations, you'll really want something that you can actuate properly, under stress.

    One of the reasons I went for the Surefire Z2S LED was because of how simple and straightforward it is to operate - but again, that light fits a much different role than my household "general use" lights: the Fenix P2D, for example, is a great light to have around-the-house and the garage, because of its different modes of operation, which closely approximates what tokerblue described for the Quark 123.

    Target your intended use of the light as your basis for the research of your purchase. There's lots of good lights out there, but one or the other will better/worse fit any set of intended uses.
    ++1. Totally agree; well said. ;-)

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

4sevens vs surefire
,

deft edc

,

deft edc flashlight

,

deft edc review

,
deft flashlight
,

maelstrom s18 review

,
maelstrom s18 vs s12
,
night light display stand
,
night stand lamp size
,

novatac 120st

,
surefire 618lm led
,

ultimate nightstand

Click on a term to search for related topics.