First aid supplies for gunshot wound

This is a discussion on First aid supplies for gunshot wound within the Related Gear & Equipment forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by JaySkiBum I've responded to a couple GSW calls as an EMT, one was a bad situation all around and the person passed ...

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Thread: First aid supplies for gunshot wound

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array suntzu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaySkiBum View Post
    I've responded to a couple GSW calls as an EMT, one was a bad situation all around and the person passed later on (.22 rifle to the temple) and the other was a .45 slug to the thigh. We used quickclot and a tourniquet with lots of bandages. A tourniquet was last ditch in the past but it has been accepted in the EMS community as an effective method to stop bleeding, used in moderation and in the correct circumstances...such as a hospital isn't 12 hours away, etc.

    The trauma packs that are sold at fire/ems stores online generally carry good stuff in them for everything bleeding related. You get what you pay for, so the cheap kits will have lots of gauze and no much else. I've seen trauma kits designed specifically for GSW that include quickclot, tourniquet, lots of big bandages, and chest seals in some of them.

    First aid classes are a must if you're serious about first aid.
    You said it better than me.
    used in moderation and in the correct circumstances...such as a hospital isn't 12 hours away, etc.
    I guess the way I read OPFOR's post was him saying to always use a tourniquet which I don't think he was saying after I re-read it. I was trying to say only use it when needed. I will still go for direct pressure first anyday.

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  3. #17
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    Man, I just typed a long, detailed, and witty response, and my interwebs took a crap on me...

    Let's just say that I agree. :)
    A man fires a rifle for many years, and he goes to war. And afterward he turns the rifle in at the armory, and he believes he's finished with the rifle. But no matter what else he might do with his hands - love a woman, build a house, change his son's diaper - his hands remember the rifle.

  4. #18
    VIP Member Array suntzu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OPFOR View Post
    Man, I just typed a long, detailed, and witty response, and my interwebs took a crap on me...

    Let's just say that I agree. :)
    LOL, I thought we would. But seriously, I was just thinking about it. To me and you and others there is a lot in the OP's question that we probably just take for granted. If you have a gunshot wound (in this case, but any trauma), you have a host of problems besides the obvious blood loss. You have possible fractures, shock, possible c-spine injury (if ya got shot, ya might have fallen and cracked your head open also).
    So go get training and if you can train to be an EMT. It is worth the time.

  5. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by OPFOR View Post
    There are very few places in the lower 48 where you cannot be inside a trauma center most ricki-tick,
    Few places in the eastern US maybe...I can stand in my backyard and see a place (Colorado Grand Mesa) where there is no cell phone service in most places (I spent 3 days up there and only had a cell signal a couple times) and will take an ambulance about an hour to get to you once you do make contact.

    I am putting together a serious first aid kit for the camper (slide-in on a 1 ton 4X4 so I can really get away) to include Quick Clot bandages and WaterJel.

  6. #20
    Member Array JaySkiBum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by suntzu View Post
    You said it better than me.


    I guess the way I read OPFOR's post was him saying to always use a tourniquet which I don't think he was saying after I re-read it. I was trying to say only use it when needed. I will still go for direct pressure first anyday.
    Yup, the internet can mask the common sense aspect that is taken for granted otherwise. And I agree, direct pressure should be the first thing you try because most of the time it works.
    limatunes likes this.

  7. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaySkiBum View Post
    Yup, the internet can mask the common sense aspect that is taken for granted otherwise. And I agree, direct pressure should be the first thing you try because most of the time it works.
    Agreed!

    While I am not an EMT (yet... I've just enrolled in an EMT class that is starting this month). I'm a student of the arts of life saving and have had lots of discussions relating to the topic with lots of different people.. many of which have seen trauma care first hand and often and if they want to come in and correct anything I'm about to say I'll graciously bow to their superior knowledge and experience.

    The general consensus is that if you are in an urban environment, unless you have hit a major blood vessel/artery, direct pressure should be all you need until help arrives. Hemostatic agents should be reserved for severe bleeding to the body.. even if the extremities are bleeding badly it can usually be stopped with direct pressure or a tourniquet.

    Some people I've talked to have great reservations about jumping straight to hemostatic agents and will try just about anything before using them. Others are more quick to recommend using things like Quick Clot... and according to everyone I've talked to the gauze is the greatest thing since sliced bread and greatly recommended over the packs.

    I carry the same things in my diaper bag/purse as I do in my range bag which are a package of QuickClot gauze, lots of sterile gauze, an Israeli bandage, a CAT (tourniquet), . I also have petroleum gauze and regular bandaids (complete with cartoon characters) and neosporin... I have two kids.. bandaids are a must!

    I also have an Ace bandage, diapers, wipes, usually a water bottle and sanitary napkins (I am a woman after all).

    I do have an emergency heat blanket in the car as well.

    As others have said, it's all about the ABCs... Airway, Breathing, Circulation. Chances are pretty good if you know how to apply pressure to a wound you will be able to save a life until help arrives.

    Honestly, I'm more worried about knife wounds and car accidents than I am gun shot wounds.... *Shudder*

  8. #22
    VIP Member Array suntzu's Avatar
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    ^^^^^^^^^^
    good kit.

    Add a SAM slplint. Also, in case you ever have to help out a young child in a bad accident, have a small stuffed animal in your kit. You will be amazed what that will do to a kid with a broken arm or leg.

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    @Opfor, good point. The range where I shoot is across the street from an ALS fire station and there's not more than 10minutes of traffic between me and a trauma center hospital. My EMS gear for out-of-town use is set up for much more detailed care than my range bag.

    @Limatunes, good job on EMT school. Paramedic after that?

    I've been meaning to get a tourniquet, just haven't gotten around to it. With the new studies, I'm convinced to carry one, even if the doc in charge won't let us use them at work. I think it has a place in my personal stuff. Also, after using it a couple times in the field, Vaseline gauze is a mess and I'm convinced the foil wrapper it comes in is more useful as a dressing than the gauze itself.
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    Wow, a lot of good comments. I'm going to add more stuff from the suggestions. The Quickclots I got are sponges and not granules. Oh, I am adding Steri-Strips in my kit for lacerations.

  11. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Superhouse 15 View Post
    @Opfor, good point. The range where I shoot is across the street from an ALS fire station and there's not more than 10minutes of traffic between me and a trauma center hospital. My EMS gear for out-of-town use is set up for much more detailed care than my range bag.

    @Limatunes, good job on EMT school. Paramedic after that?

    I've been meaning to get a tourniquet, just haven't gotten around to it. With the new studies, I'm convinced to carry one, even if the doc in charge won't let us use them at work. I think it has a place in my personal stuff. Also, after using it a couple times in the field, Vaseline gauze is a mess and I'm convinced the foil wrapper it comes in is more useful as a dressing than the gauze itself.
    Yeah, the wrapper there is more useful than the product...
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    Quote Originally Posted by suntzu View Post
    ^^^^^^^^^^
    good kit.

    Add a SAM slplint. Also, in case you ever have to help out a young child in a bad accident, have a small stuffed animal in your kit. You will be amazed what that will do to a kid with a broken arm or leg.
    I carry 3 or 4 different stuffed animals in a bag in the trunk of my patrol car....used them several times on car wrecks, bad calls at the house, etc, helps divert attention, calm them down, and is a good PR for the kiddos to see us evil LEOs in a different light than their parents tell them
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