Any first aid kit recommendations?

This is a discussion on Any first aid kit recommendations? within the Related Gear & Equipment forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; OK then allow me to stand humbly corrected since I absolutely would trust a recommendation from Bark'n with regard to a purchase of a ready ...

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  1. #16
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    OK then allow me to stand humbly corrected since I absolutely would trust a recommendation from Bark'n with regard to a purchase of a ready made up kit.
    He knows his stuff! ~~~>
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  3. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by QKShooter View Post
    OK then allow me to stand humbly corrected since I absolutely would trust a recommendation from Bark'n with regard to a purchase of a ready made up kit.
    He knows his stuff! ~~~>
    Yes he does.

    He should create and market his own packs. I am sure they would be a winner.
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  4. #18
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    Again, I'll say that every commercially made kit I have ever bought, I've always tweaked and enhanced it with extra stuff according to my skill set. Certainly, building your own kit from the ground up is the way to go, but can be expensive and not everyone wants to go to that extent.

    But I do like what Adventure Medical Kits puts together in their various models.

    Also places like Rescue Essentials and Chinook Medical have medical kit Components or Modules which are excellent mini-kits to use inside your main kit. They have modules like Airway Modules, Dental Kit Modules, Bleeding Control Modules, Wound Closure Modules, Over-the-Counter Medication Modules, etc which allow you to buy only the stuff you want to add to a kit you are piecing together yourself.

    Be sure and check them out. I've bought from both those places for years and highly recommend both of them as a source for professional quality medical supplies. Chinook is also a GSA, DoD vendor/supplier.
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  5. #19
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    Thanks Bark'n I am ordering 3 Water Jel house hold burn kits
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  6. #20
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    Whatever you decide...throw a box of tampons in there. A good quick way to stop the bleeding from a gsw.

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  7. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nebraska12 View Post
    Whatever you decide...throw a box of tampons in there. A good quick way to stop the bleeding from a gsw.

    Sent from my PG06100 using Tapatalk 2
    I know it sounds funny, but we had a 7-11 clerk who severely cut his arm on broken glass. Massive bleeding. Before our arrival he immediately went to the "women's products" aisle and tore open a box of "pads" (super absorbent, of course) and wrapped the wound and held pressure. He did himself a favor with that quick move. They can make really good trauma dressings.

    I am not sure about stuffing a tampon into a GSW though. I will run this past hubby. As Paramedics go....I was very good.....hubby is better.
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  8. #22
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  9. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spirit51 View Post
    I am not sure about stuffing a tampon into a GSW though. I will run this past hubby. As Paramedics go....I was very good.....hubby is better.
    Please do, I did. I ran the notion by several medic buddies when I was presented with the idea. When the issue is life or death, seems they all agree that it would be a good idea. Would probably hurt like all heck when the adrenaline wears off though. Since you two are Medics, I guess it should be said that I have worked as an EMT for 10 years and I'm still certified in a few states. I'm no doctor, and the advice I give should be left to your discretion. Would I try it personally if I were in a situation that warranted it? Absolutely. But, I'd be interested in what your husband had to say.

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  10. #24
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    A couple of things regarding tampons. First of all, while they are highly absorbent, I think most of them have some sort of perfume which I would be hesitant to insert into a wound (Unless that's all you have). Just my opinion.

    Second, most gunshot wounds leave way too small diameter hole to allow inserting a tampon into. The skin is very elastic, and the entry hole left by .22 cal, 9mm, .38, .40 cal and likely even .45 acp will be too small an entry wound to fit a tampon. An exit wound may be large enough to allow that. Most people are not going to be shot by a rifle, .223, .308 etc... At least we hope not. The entrance wound caused by a rifle may be large enough to accept it, but I'm thinking even from a hi-velocity .223 is going to be pretty tiny.

    In my opinion Tampons are not my first, second or even third choice for bleeding control. Not with all the decent wound dressings which are already out there. Yes, tampons are cheap and during a SHTF/Zombie Apocalypse they are probably good things to have.

    Things like Quick Clot "Combat Gauze" or Celox Gauze are long lengths of "roller gauze" impregnated with a hemostatic agent to help stop massive bleeding. I would think you could pack a small portion of those deep into a gun shot wound using your finger easier than a large diameter tampon. For the rest of the roll, you wad it up and use as a pressure dressing on the wound with just a small portion of the tail stuffed inside the wound.

    I won't say tampons, may not or can not be useful... They are just not my first round choice. A regular maxipad used as a large ABD dressing would be more appropriate, and work with a larger variety of wounds.

    Just my two cents.
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  11. #25
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    Yes, I agree with you. I did say, given the situation, I would use one if I had to. Would it be my first choice? No, I'd stick with the basics, pressure, dressing, more pressure, pressure to the supplying artery, elevation, etc. I suppose I could have been more clear. Sorry folks! My bad.

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  12. #26
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    I agree. Build it yourself.
    However, if time is an issue, just go get a standard OTC kit until you can get a customized one together. Make sure to add QuickClot to it.. the stuff is incredible!!!

    I used to own a company (pre 9/11) that specialized in custom first aid kits. I have been toying with restarting this company.
    People now are much more safety-concious post 9/11. lack of sales and interest was the reason I shut it down. As a former EMT, I agree with a lot of what Spirit51 and Bark'n say. However, I have used "unscented" maxipads for wound treatment before. Not always a viable option depending upon the size of the wound, but was effective.
    Tampons on the other hand, I do have a problem with. While absolute sterility in the field is not a huge issue to me (how many GSWs have been staunched by a dirty t-shirt) the cotton fibers that tampons are made with could be prone to separating and embedding into the wound and a ER doc may not catch them all upon clean-up and infection control. Then you could have a serious infection issue. However, maxipads have a nonwoven cover on them that prevents the fibrous material from embedding and sticking in the wound.

    PM me if you would like, and I would be glad to help you create a kit that fits your purpose and needs.

    P.S. Maxipads also make GREAT car buffers for waxing! :)
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  13. #27
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    I would reccomend keeping it simple. Unless you have formal training in first aide or emergency medicine you shouldnt carry much more than some 4x4's, kerlix/clinge/roller gauze, assorted size band aids, tape, trauma sheers and a CPR facemask or face shield. Most of these items you can carry on your person with some ease.

    Otherwise there isnt very much else you should need. It really burns me when people with no medical training what-so-ever start pulli junk out of their kits like angiocaths and quick clot.

    As far as rendering care to strangers, you may be covered by good samaratin laws but be careful what you do. You can still put yourself in a bad spot for practicing without a license if you use more advanced equipment and procedures.

    The NUMBER ONE item in ANY first aid kit should be your brain. Get certified in CPR and First Aid. Find an American Heart Association certified training center or instructor in your area. Get yourself and family certified.
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  14. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by catt101 View Post
    I agree. Build it yourself.
    However, if time is an issue, just go get a standard OTC kit until you can get a customized one together. Make sure to add QuickClot to it.. the stuff is incredible!!!

    I used to own a company (pre 9/11) that specialized in custom first aid kits. I have been toying with restarting this company.
    People now are much more safety-concious post 9/11. lack of sales and interest was the reason I shut it down. As a former EMT, I agree with a lot of what Spirit51 and Bark'n say. However, I have used "unscented" maxipads for wound treatment before. Not always a viable option depending upon the size of the wound, but was effective.
    Tampons on the other hand, I do have a problem with. While absolute sterility in the field is not a huge issue to me (how many GSWs have been staunched by a dirty t-shirt) the cotton fibers that tampons are made with could be prone to separating and embedding into the wound and a ER doc may not catch them all upon clean-up and infection control. Then you could have a serious infection issue. However, maxipads have a nonwoven cover on them that prevents the fibrous material from embedding and sticking in the wound.

    PM me if you would like, and I would be glad to help you create a kit that fits your purpose and needs.

    P.S. Maxipads also make GREAT car buffers for waxing! :)
    I believe that Barkn and I both thought that Maxipads were a good idea....it was Tampons we had a problem with...like you did for many of the same reasons.

    I have seen maxipads used as small trauma dressings before with great success. We often tore open our OB kits to get one.
    A woman must not depend on protection by men. A woman must learn to protect herself.
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    A armed society is a polite society. Manners are good when one has to back it up with his life.
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  15. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ionracas View Post
    I would reccomend keeping it simple. Unless you have formal training in first aide or emergency medicine you shouldnt carry much more than some 4x4's, kerlix/clinge/roller gauze, assorted size band aids, tape, trauma sheers and a CPR facemask or face shield. Most of these items you can carry on your person with some ease.

    Otherwise there isnt very much else you should need. It really burns me when people with no medical training what-so-ever start pulli junk out of their kits like angiocaths and quick clot.

    As far as rendering care to strangers, you may be covered by good samaratin laws but be careful what you do. You can still put yourself in a bad spot for practicing without a license if you use more advanced equipment and procedures.

    The NUMBER ONE item in ANY first aid kit should be your brain. Get certified in CPR and First Aid. Find an American Heart Association certified training center or instructor in your area. Get yourself and family certified.
    I would also suggest if someone has the time and money....take a E.M.T. course. Even if you don't get certified and work in the field....the training will be valuable in your own life. It will teach you what to do and what not to do in case of a Medical Emergency and Traumatic Emergency while waiting for the ambulance. You will learn when to move a person and when NOT to move a person....pressure points and direct pressure to control bleeding. Of course CPR...allergic reactions and a host of other things that we may be exposed to.
    catt101 likes this.
    A woman must not depend on protection by men. A woman must learn to protect herself.
    Susan B. Anthony
    A armed society is a polite society. Manners are good when one has to back it up with his life.
    Robert Heinlein

  16. #30
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    There is always the possibility that a more qualified person will be on the scene or close by.
    So the person with a product like CELOX in their kit may not be personally qualified to use it for a GSW or a serious knife wound but, you or Bark'n or Spirit may be on the scene and could administer proper medical care if the necessary supplies were available in some location where Paramedics or ambulance care were not quickly available.

    For that reason I'm all for humping more advanced medical equipment/supplies if there is space for it and weight is not a major concern.

    And then also...if say a hunter sustains major arterial bleeding out in the middle of nowhere...& he has got Quick-Clot or CELOX - he might not be qualified or certified but, he might not have any other realistic option either but to use it.


    Quote Originally Posted by Ionracas View Post
    I would recommend keeping it simple. Unless you have formal training in first aide or emergency medicine you shouldn't carry much more than some 4x4's, kerlix/clinge/roller gauze, assorted size band aids, tape, trauma sheers and a CPR face-mask or face shield. Most of these items you can carry on your person with some ease.

    Otherwise there isnt very much else you should need. It really burns me when people with no medical training what-so-ever start pulling junk out of their kits like angiocaths and quick clot.

    As far as rendering care to strangers, you may be covered by good Samaritan laws but be careful what you do. You can still put yourself in a bad spot for practicing without a license if you use more advanced equipment and procedures.

    The NUMBER ONE item in ANY first aid kit should be your brain. Get certified in CPR and First Aid. Find an American Heart Association certified training center or instructor in your area. Get yourself and family certified.
    Spirit51, nedrgr21 and Bark'n like this.
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