Any first aid kit recommendations?

Any first aid kit recommendations?

This is a discussion on Any first aid kit recommendations? within the Related Gear & Equipment forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; With more time, I'd put one together myself, and have a decent first aid kit as part of me EDC. Looking for something to stash ...

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  1. #1
    Senior Member Array Dandyone's Avatar
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    Any first aid kit recommendations?

    With more time, I'd put one together myself, and have a decent first aid kit as part of me EDC.

    Looking for something to stash in the car for 'real' emergencies (earthquake country, wilderness first responder, etc.)

    Less that $100 would be ideal.


  2. #2
    Member Array nti06's Avatar
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    I have one of these kits by Adventure Medical >Day Tripper Kit by Adventure Medical Kits - YouTube

    It fits the zippered end pocket on my Midway range bag perfectly. The kit comes with a little book that gives you professional grade first aid tips too.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Array Caertaker's Avatar
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    Here is a manageable EDC trama kit advocated by Paul Gomez:

    EDC Trauma Kit by Gomez-Training - YouTube

  4. #4
    Distinguished Member Array Burns's Avatar
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    Making your own is so much better :/ You normally end up with 4 kits for the price of 1.
    Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable- JFK

  5. #5
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    What burns said. The main thing is not what is in the kit but what is in your head.

    A first aid kit is exactly that. You can have advaced gear and a basic knowledge so you can do nothing more than put on bandaids. Get some training, befriend a nurse/doctor/paramedic watch videos, take a class. A lot of the training is free Red Cross, American heart and so on.
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    "A first rate man with a third rate gun is far better than the other way around". The gun is a tool, you are the craftsman that makes it work. There are those who say "if I had to do it, I could" yet they never go out and train to do it. Don't let stupid be your mindset. Harryball 2013

  6. #6
    Senior Member Array Dandyone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tacman605 View Post
    What burns said. The main thing is not what is in the kit but what is in your head.

    A first aid kit is exactly that. You can have advaced gear and a basic knowledge so you can do nothing more than put on bandaids. Get some training, befriend a nurse/doctor/paramedic watch videos, take a class. A lot of the training is free Red Cross, American heart and so on.
    True, and good advice. In all honesty, in my previous career I was a climbing guide, so I've gone through the wilderness first aid and first responder classes, but that was many years ago. I'm due for a refresher.

    As for the 'make your own', again, great advice and totally true. At this point, however, the build-a-kit will remain just out of the top priorities on my ever-evolving 'to do' list. Hence, I'm fine with plopping down a bit of extra cash for a pre-made kit.

    Thanks guys.

  7. #7
    Ex Member Array barstoolguru's Avatar
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    Once that guy started to talk about using my keys I shut it down, I am not giving up my keys and the only source of getting someone to the hospital.

    I am no medic so I use some basic common sense, gauze pads , a 12 dollar tourniquet you can get off of EBay, sugar (yes sugar- it will cause clotting of blood) antiseptic pads, needle and thread ( curved and nylon thread) med tape , med scissors, bandages, duct tape (multi-uses)
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  8. #8
    Distinguished Member Array Burns's Avatar
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    Super glue is another useful thing to add, closes up smaller cuts very nicely.
    Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable- JFK

  9. #9
    Senior Member Array IAm_Not_Lost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by barstoolguru View Post
    I am no medic so I use some basic common sense, gauze pads , a 12 dollar tourniquet you can get off of EBay, sugar (yes sugar- it will cause clotting of blood) antiseptic pads, needle and thread ( curved and nylon thread) med tape , med scissors, bandages, duct tape (multi-uses)
    As a nurse I would not recommend using needle and thread if it's not something your trained to use, as frequently it causes more problems than solves. A great alternative are steri strips, which I believe you can buy at any wal mart.

    Any of my basic kits (I keep one in the car, hiking pack, exc) include bandaids, antiseptic cream, tylenol, ibupofen, benadryl, steri strips, tape, ace wrap, gauze, antiseptic wipes, gloves (latex or vinyl exc) quik-clot, and yes my hiking pack does include needle and thread, but that's for more of a utility purpose. I have a few more odds and ends too, and it all fits into the quart sized zip lock baggies.

    Great things to keep in the car in addition to a basic kit are pocket masks, a clean blanket or sheet, water, and an old c-collar if you can get your hands on one. Anyways you can quickly get most of the above mentioned items at any drug store or walmart, or scrounge them up from someone who works at a hospital.
    marcclarke and DefConGun like this.
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  10. #10
    VIP Member Array Spirit51's Avatar
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    I will have to send hubby here later. He is finishing up with his advanced pack. We are paramedics so it is customized to our training. I was kidding him the other day about when his stretcher arrives....he said in a couple of days. I thought he was kidding....nope. It is a stretcher that is folded to the size of a book and goes into his first aid pack.

    I have told him before he should put together and market a basic first aid kit for shooters. I wish he would.

    He carrys "needle and thread". He has done stitiches on me twice and does a great job. I have done stitches on two of my dogs...at different times. Did a pretty good job if I say so myself. All the sewing and needlepoint paid off for me. LOL He learned when working in the ER.
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  11. #11
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    I built my own and have a small one in each car and a larger on for home/family camping. It doesn't take much time to put together and is a lot cheaper. In another life I use to be a backcountry guide and had wilderness first responder training (although I am about 10 years out of date) now I'm just certified in Red Cross First Aid
    “You can sway a thousand men by appealing to their prejudices quicker than you can convince one man by logic.”

    ― Robert A. Heinlein,

  12. #12
    VIP Member Array nedrgr21's Avatar
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    Gonna call BS on the time issue - seriously, you don't have 5 min to walk down the pharmacy aisle at Walmart? Go down one aisle and toss 1 box of bandaids x 2 sizes, 4x4 pads, roll of gauze x 2 sizes, wet wipes, pain reliever pills, anti-diarreha, antibiotic ointment, burn gel, sunscreen, insect repellent, triangle bandage, tampons, anything else that catches your eye, then throw all in a bag - done. That's what you'll get with about every kit sold anyway, and the individual items will be of better quality. Also, remember the stuff like OTC meds will have to be replaced periodically. Most stuff is already in your bathroom/kitchen, unused. Look at the quantities in the kit below as a guide to go shopping there first.

    If you want to get a little more fancy get a chest seal, Sam splint, ace bandage, CPR mask, and Israeli bandage over the net.

    Unless you also have to tools/knowledge to properly clean an open wound and create a sterile area, you probably shouldn't be closing serious wounds with sutures and glue anyway.

    edit: was looking around for something else and found this $100 kit - pretty much a whole lot of bandages and OTC meds + SamSplint and CPR mask. Hint: you can find a flexible al splint for $5.
    Last edited by nedrgr21; July 3rd, 2012 at 01:57 AM.

  13. #13
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    I'd search the Internet for First Aid kits and just see what is in those and then tailor one to your projected specific needs.

    ABSOLUTELY though. Make up your own rather than buying a ready made kit.

    For sure add some sterile Emergency Eye Wash ~ If you are planning on being around guns and knives then "Priority 1" absolutely add some CELOX.

    Buy a pump bottle of Wound Wash and some wound closure strips. Good ol' Iodine is a must (don't get the decolorized)

    Start getting in the habit of treating any injury that breaks the skin with soap/water, Triple Antibiotic, Iodine, Alcohol...Silver bearing ointment - Something!
    So far I know of two cases PERSONALLY of Flesh Eating Bacteria - That is on the rise and you do not want to start losing limbs due to necessary amputation and get filleted open like a fish in order to kill it since it is resistant to all antibiotics.

    One person here in PA got it from a little tiny football cleat puncture and another from a little thorn puncture.

    I always force all non bleeding puncture wounds to bleed! Since most of the camping and wilderness puncture type injuries (from my experience) will be on the hands, fingers, and lower arms - I spin my arm around FAST and that will force it to bleed and then I treat it right away with anything I have available.

    I force puncture wounds to the feet and anywhere else to bleed by squeezing until they bleed. And then I usually force some Hydrogen Peroxide down in there and I treat it topically.

    Regular cuts and gashes are pretty easy to clean out and keep from getting infected. Puncture wounds are especially potentially deadly because it's the perfect environment down in there for really bad bugs to fester, multiply, spread, and get into the bloodstream.
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  14. #14
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    Flesh-eating bug victim 'just so happy' to leave hospital alive

    Sure, she's missing her left leg, her right foot and most of her hands,
    but Aimee Copeland is out of the hospital and happy. The 24-year-old Georgia woman, infected with flesh-eating bacteria after a zip-line fall gashed open her leg, transitioned to rehab Monday, and her dad, who has tracked her progress on Facebook told CNN she's "very excited, like a kid going off to college."
    Copeland is "just so happy to be alive," her sister Paige said, adding, "She relishes life. Every day is a gift." That's a perspective even those of us with all our limbs should adopt.

  15. #15
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    I have several different aid kits I have put together, all providing different levels of care. Sometimes it can be rather expensive to piece-meal a good kit when ordering supplies online. Shipping prices is a killer, and adds up quickly.

    I have found Adventure Medical Kits .9 Ultralight to be an excellent all around first aid kit. It is very light weight, waterproof and by adding a few select additional items like a combat gauze, a couple of Water Jel burn dressings and a few other select items I have significantly enhanced its capabilities.

    There are many decent commercial made first aid kits that just need a little tweaking and a few additions of other specialized items to really enhance their capabilities.

    I will mention that burn injuries are an often overlooked component in a lot of first aid kits. Any serious first aid kit should address this. Burns are probably some of the most painful injuries there is. Burns are also very prone to infection which can cause serious complications if not addressed.

    Anyone who spends any time in the back woods, outback, remote camp sites and such, and especially if you have camp fires, quality burn dressings is essential. I highly recommend the Water Jel burn dressings. We use them on our EMS service and I carry at least a couple in all my first aid kits. Water Jel burn dressings benefits are that they instantly cool the burn and actually stop the burn process which significantly reduces pain and stops further injury. Secondly, they seal the burn including all the exposed nerve endings which again reduces the pain considerably as well as keep dirt and germs from the burn to reduce chance of infection. Also on burns covering large areas of the body, because it is a gel soaked gauze, it does not evaporate as readily as dressings soaked with water and thus, will not promote or cause hypothermia in the patient. They have been approved for use with EMS agencies who have both wet or dry burn care protocols because of the fact that they do not promote hypothermia.

    Anyone who may be in the outdoors and may be several hours or even a day or two away from receiving definitive and advanced medical care should consider having some Water Jel burn dressings in their kit.

    Having some sterile wound irrigating solution is also a very good idea as QKShooter has mentioned. Several of the Joplin Tornado victims developed flesh eating bacteria and other weird and nasty stuff the CDC had a hard time determining. They determined it was caused by contaminated soil and other stuff being blown into their open wounds from the high winds.

    What I recommend and what I use in my first aid kits is a product called SALJET. Sal Jet is nothing more than sterile normal saline packaged in 30 ml (1 oz) plastic squeeze tubes. You just twist the cap off and squirt it in the wound to flush and clean any type of wound. SalJet is .9% normal saline with no preservatives or additives so it is safe to use as an eye wash as well. They are small cube and I carry anywhere from one to four or five of them in each of my kits depending on the size of my kits. Since they do not have any additives or preservatives, I would not keep them much beyond their expiration dates. I would think as long as it's clear and no floaties in it, it would be okay, but I just replace them when expired beyond six months or so.
    (Tip: If you have some Betadine solution and a needle and syringe. After you twist the cap off the top of the Sal Jet tube you can draw up some Betadine in the syringe and place a couple drops of Betadine into the open tip of the Sal Jet tube for a diluted Betadine/Saline solution for wound irrigation. Just a drop or two of Betadine is all you need and personally, I don't use any Betadine in most cases).

    You can get both Water Jel burn dressings and Sal Jet off of ebay, Amazon or Rescue Essentials is also a good source with fresh manufacture dates. They seem to have the longest expiration dates.
    -Bark'n
    Semper Fi


    "The gun is the great equalizer... For it is the gun, that allows the meek to repel the monsters; Whom are bigger, stronger and without conscience, prey on those who without one, would surely perish."

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