Gun safe location questions

This is a discussion on Gun safe location questions within the Related Gear & Equipment forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I live in a two story house. Gun safes are heavy. I am planning on buying one to put my growing collection into, as well ...

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    VIP Member Array BigJon10125's Avatar
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    Gun safe location questions

    I live in a two story house. Gun safes are heavy. I am planning on buying one to put my growing collection into, as well as other valuable items. My question is to whether there are any issues with having it not upstairs in or near the bedrooms?

    I have a locking cabinet that I currently use and some items will stay there incase an immediate use need arises. Looking to pick the brains of you more experienced folks.

    Any suggestions on safes would be appreciated as well. I already know to buy bigger than what I think ill need!
    BigJon


    "Better to keep your mouth shut and be thought a fool than to open it and remove all doubt" ~ Mark Twain

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    Distinguished Member Array SCXDm9's Avatar
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    Any safe can be opened. ANY SAFE CAN BE OPENED! The safety in a safe is hidding it, if someone breaks into your home and has time they will get it open. In my opinion, if you are putting it upstairs get one that will fit into a closet and hid it with coats and dresses.
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    VIP Member Array BigJon10125's Avatar
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    That is why I also have a house alarm, which can also be defeated. It is to inspire them to leave or not stay long.
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    BigJon


    "Better to keep your mouth shut and be thought a fool than to open it and remove all doubt" ~ Mark Twain

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    Distinguished Member Array lchamp's Avatar
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    Our gun safe is in a part of the house where casual repair people will not see it and it is rather well hidden down a dead-end hallway and behind hanging clothes. I always carry when I'm home.
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    Member Array uscarry45's Avatar
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    Most burglars spend less than 15 minutes in your house, getting a safe is a GREAT idea, make sure that you securely bolt it down so it cannot be moved rocked tipped etc. I see no reason not to have it on the ground floor. I am not sure that it needs to be 100% concealed but I would keep it out of view of delivery drivers or other people at the front door, on the sidewalk etc.
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    Distinguished Member Array lchamp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by uscarry45 View Post
    I am not sure that it needs to be 100% concealed but I would keep it out of view of delivery drivers or other people at the front door, on the sidewalk etc.
    Very important point.
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    Member Array tdw63's Avatar
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    In a two story house I like downstairs because you can bolt it to the foundation. I live in a two story and have mine downstairs bolted to the foundation with four wedge anchors.
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    The vast majority of home burglers are not safe crackers. They want in and out with whatever they can carry away. Anything you do is helpful; nothing you do is fool proof.
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    Distinguished Member Array SCXDm9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by uscarry45 View Post
    Most burglars spend less than 15 minutes in your house, getting a safe is a GREAT idea, make sure that you securely bolt it down so it cannot be moved rocked tipped etc. I see no reason not to have it on the ground floor. I am not sure that it needs to be 100% concealed but I would keep it out of view of delivery drivers or other people at the front door, on the sidewalk etc.
    My oldest son is a locksmith and can share more than a few stories of burglars that spent only 15 minutes in the house.... the first time. The second time, they wait long enough for you to replaced what they took the first time and come back with tools to get your safe open... in 15 minutes.
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    Member Array BadHabit's Avatar
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    A few engineer friends helped put my 1100 lb'er on the second floor of an apartment. The maintenance guy who lived below me freaked out so my engineer friends graphically explained to him how industry construction calls for a capability to handle 175 lbs's sq/ft on the second level and how my safe loaded barely broke 125 lbs/sq ft. That was 20 years ago and I still don't think he understands....You should be safe. Have fun putting it up there. They are even more fun taking them down the stairs.

    A safe absolutely needs to be bolted down. I just moved the same safe thru a carped house into the garage by myself with my wife. All we used were 6 1 1/4 inch PVC pipes. I was able to push it by myself while on the pipes. Now putting it on a truck.... well that was another matter all together!
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    Distinguished Member Array shadowwalker's Avatar
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    A friend sometime back put a safe in his garage off of his bedroom but the catch is he had it delivered in a refer box, he and his son put a front on the safe that looks like a old refer with a rope around it and a old electrical hanging off of the rope. I have not talked with him for a couple of years but I think i'll check with him and see if he still has it.

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    Member Array GettingOld2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigJon10125 View Post
    I live in a two story house. Gun safes are heavy. I am planning on buying one to put my growing collection into, as well as other valuable items. My question is to whether there are any issues with having it not upstairs in or near the bedrooms?

    I have a locking cabinet that I currently use and some items will stay there incase an immediate use need arises. Looking to pick the brains of you more experienced folks.

    Any suggestions on safes would be appreciated as well. I already know to buy bigger than what I think ill need!
    A few observations:

    Gun safes are not truly safes, they are security containers that are typically made of something like 8 gauge (1/8 inch) sheet steel as opposed to something out of the old west that required dynamite.

    The number one failure mechanism is an electronic lock. Unless you need fast access, a mechanical spin dial can last forever.

    No such thing as "fire proof". At best there is a resistance rating that is typically only around 20 minutes to a couple of hours depending upon rating and conditions.

    Most modern homes do not have sufficient empty wall space behind the dry wall to accommodate even a relatively small safe in the wall.

    Safes are heavy! (duh) You may want to consider a take apart safe like Gun Safes for your home or business | Zanotti Armor®
    Unfortunately the Zanotti lead time is around a year.

    Interior lighting, safes are dark! Instead of expensive safe lighting kits, consider white LED Christmas tree lights.

    Good Luck!

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    VIP Member Array high pockets's Avatar
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    If you get a safe, be sure to put at least one investment earning item in it. As long as you use the safe to store an income producing item (such as 1 or more stock certificate), the safe becomes a deductible item.

    It has to be an income producing item, just putting something valuable in it doesn't count.
    "If you make something idiot proof, someone will make a better idiot."

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    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigJon10125 View Post
    I live in a two story house. Gun safes are heavy.

    My question is to whether there are any issues with having it not upstairs in or near the bedrooms?
    Thoughts ...

    I'm all for having a couple of safes: one for stout, secure storage of the bulk of your valuable (safe-worthy) possessions; another for storage that allows for rapid access of the primary defensive weapons. It's definitely worthwhile to have the larger, more-valuable one be practically impossible to move (ie, bolted to the foundation/walls, cemented in, hard to find, whatever. Of course with any safe that's lighter, flimsier and more-accessible, it's much more likely to be seen, taken. But it's also more readily gotten to by you, when needed.

    As with any security, layering is important. A safe just lying there won't last long in a determined attack that can simply pick up the entire thing and leave, hence monitored house alarms. A violent, rapid home invasion can be hard to defend against if one doesn't have any advance warning, hence the value of alert dogs, perimeter sensing, etc. An attack at night during sleep can be difficult if one can't keep the invaders away sufficiently long to allow access to the weaponry, hence the value of upstairs bedrooms with a difficult-to-breach entry into the "safe" room (bedroom), ie a stout security door at the stairwell and/or bedroom.
    Last edited by ccw9mm; November 19th, 2012 at 07:54 AM. Reason: spelling
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    Member Array Mark_in_wi's Avatar
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    Lots of good info here. I was also told the machanical lock is the best option, but if you can't turn the lock when you are turning the handle its not as secure.

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