Binoculars

This is a discussion on Binoculars within the Related Gear & Equipment forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Originally Posted by Team American Black Bear, you've just about got me talked into using my gift certificates for a Nikon Monarch...what are your thoughts ...

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Thread: Binoculars

  1. #16
    Member Array black bear 84's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Team American View Post
    Black Bear, you've just about got me talked into using my gift certificates for a Nikon Monarch...what are your thoughts on 8X vs. 10X magnification?

    I apologize Team American, I overlooked your question above the first time.

    It all depends where in how you use binoculars.
    If I were you I would go with the 8x by 42 mm instead of the 10x, sometimes the 10x is a little too much to hold steady.

    Hunting in the West requires serious glassing; you and your guide will be in the top of the mountain overlooking a valley.
    The glassing is done from the sitting position with your elbows anchored near the knee caps, and you holding the binoculars with two hands and the index fingers anchored at the temples.

    Before dark the guide will want to get out of the mountain, to see where you are both putting your feet clearly, and the better light gathering of the 8x is not going to be needed. So under those conditions and the increased distances in the West, a 10x makes sense.

    In the East we use the binoculars mostly from the standing position and with one hand (in the other hand we hold the rifle). The distances are not great and we just scan the timber for an antler sticking out from a tree, a patch of fur, or the liquid black of an eye.
    We rarely seat to scan as the snow will wet our pants and as the terrain is flatter and the distances to go back to camp shorter, we stay longer hunting until dusk.

    Under these conditions the 8x makes more sense, since the increased pupil diameter (5.25 mm for the 8x against the 4.2 of the 10x) will make the 8x better at the light conditions of dawn and dusk.


    Best regards
    Black Bear
    Builder of the BOREALIS 1050 lumens flashlight


    and www.blackbearflashlights.com

    E-Mail admin@blackbearflashlights.com

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  3. #17
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    Thanks Black Bear...

    I've pretty much decided to go with the 8x42 Nikon's. Great thread here...
    "I surrounded 'em"- Alvin York

    "They're ain't many troubles that a man can't fix with seven hundred dollars and a thirty ought six"- Jeff Cooper

  4. #18
    Member Array black bear 84's Avatar
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    THE BUSHNELL CUSTOM COMPACT
    6X BY 25MM BINOCULARS

    Hi guys,
    This is for all the old timers that bought small binoculars in the 70’s.

    This was the most popular and highly regarded binoculars in the decade of the seventies and beyond, five guys in my hunting club had them, I bought one in the middle seventies and another for my wife a couple of years later.



    Mine had the center screw hinge attachment for the strap and my wife’s was a little more modern with the strap attachments on the side of the body.



    In the pictures you can see my wife’s binocular with the optional rubber covering that was sold by Bushnell, it makes the binocular appear a little bigger, but it was a great noise reducer and helped with grasping the small binocular.
    It will be a surprise to many to learn that the Custom Compact is still made today by Bushnell, in a slightly changed outside appearance, with a street price of about $220USD.
    However they sell the 7x26, instead of the six powers. I consider the six power a better magnification for small binoculars as the exit pupil is 4.16 mm, a much better aperture for looking under low light conditions.


    http://www.opticsplanet.net/bushnell...rs-120726.html


    Hope you guys have enjoyed the trip down memory lane.
    All the best


    Black Bear
    Builder of the BOREALIS 1050 lumens flashlight


    and www.blackbearflashlights.com

    E-Mail admin@blackbearflashlights.com

  5. #19
    Member Array black bear 84's Avatar
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    HOW TO GLASS
    Well, what now, you just put he binoculars to your eyes and look through them, right?

    Just in case we have new binocular users here, I am going to explain the mechanics of glassing the right way. Not long ago a new hunter in the family was showing me his new binoculars that I noticed were adjusted in the interpupilary distance with a far greater length that I knew his eyes to be set.

    When I questioned him if he was not seeing two uncompleted circles when looking through the glasses, he admitted it and was surprised when I told him that the binoculars are supposed to deliver only one circle. I guess he has seen too many movies where the view trough binoculars are shown that way.

    So our first business with the binoc is to adjust the interpupilary distance by bending the barrels at the center hinge until our eyes see only one circle; that will ensure that the optical center of the glasses is in line with the center of our pupils.

    Second is to adjust the diopter wheel that is usually in the right barrel; as not everybody has 20/20 vision, this wheel will adjust the focus for your right eye. To accomplish the adjustment cover the right objective with your hand or objective cap, look through the glasses and adjust the center wheel until the view is sharp and clear, now cover the left objective and adjust the diopter wheel until the view is sharp.

    I used for years to do this in the reverse sequence, adjusting the diopter first and then the center wheel, you get the same results.
    Look at the markings at the edge of the wheel to remember the settings in case somebody changes them, (I just put a small drop of white out correction fluid to mark the setting).
    The eye relief is fixed and in modern binoculars quite generous, but the eye cups collapse to use the binoculars with your eye glasses, some models can be adjusted to stop midway or at increments so you can get your oculars lenses as far or as close as you want to your eye glasses.

    Now you are ready to glass, if yours glasses are 10x they are marginal in how steady you can hold them, people varies but 10x is the magnification that can do with some serious help in holding the glasses.

    Sit down and brace your elbows against your knees or sunk them into your stomach looking for the best stable position, grasp you binos with both hands but leave your index fingers free and anchor them against your temples, or alternatively grasp the edge of your cap’s bill to add another anchor point. What you are looking for is to minimize or cancel any tremors, as a jumping up and down picture magnified 10x will not let you appreciate the detail that you bought the glasses for.

    With the 8x you have a little more freedom from those tremors, I have a very steady hand (I am a watchmaker) and can hold 8x glasses with one hand for relatively quick looks, but it is not recommended, after all glasses are not for quick looks.

    Don’t scan with glasses, your vision should be concentrated in the center of your view, and the glasses when moving, should be moving in very small increments when you are sure that the picture that you are seeing is completely understood by your brain.

    The part of the eye that does the stationary looking and captures detail is very small; it is called the macula and covers only two degrees of your vision. When looking through 8x glasses this angle decrease to ¼ of a degree, so if you want to capture the detail that you pay so much money for, keep your glasses steady and look through the center of them.

    The crouch and the belly down position are also glassing positions that should be not overlooked, take a tip from African hunters and steady your glasses in the standing position with the aid of a mono pod or shooting sticks or even a walking stick.

    In carrying your glasses you can do as the African white hunters do and use a long strap to place them out of the way in the left side of your body at waist level and under your arm, or hang them from your neck but with a very short strap, so they ride high on your chest and will not swing and strike another object when you bend down.

    There are in the market some harnesses that will keep your binoculars close to your body when you move around, but they usually interfere with other equipment, at least in my case as I wear a back pack most of the time but for those that carry only the glasses those harnesses work well.

    All the best
    Black Bear
    Builder of the BOREALIS 1050 lumens flashlight


    and www.blackbearflashlights.com

    E-Mail admin@blackbearflashlights.com

  6. #20
    Member Array black bear 84's Avatar
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    NIGHT OWL 4X NIGHT VISION
    COMPACT BINOCULARS

    I have owned this night vision binoculars for about seven years. They are made in Russia and feature the first generation of Russian intensifiers tubes that are so popular lately.

    It is my understanding that the Russian tubes were not of new manufacturing, but surplus tubes were released into the market. My first unit of these binoculars had a tube that was much dimmer than the other; however the Night Owl Company quickly exchanged them at my request.

    As you probably you already know, unlike the older infrared night vision technology, the intensifier tubes do just that: intensify the light that is available (up to 30,000 times according to the instructions) and if ambient light is present, it doesn’t depend on the attached infrared emitter that is placed on top of the binoculars as an extension of the center pivot.

    The binoculars enlarge the image transmitted to the oculars by 4 times. Not exactly a long-range pair of binoculars, but really very useful at short distances.




    The Infrared emitter has a separate button for its operation. It is not really full infrared (infrared light is invisible) but a good amount of red shows out of the lens of the tube, making the fact that you are watching with them noticeable to humans. For game it really doesn’t matter, as most animals are blind to the red spectrum of light.

    When used with a truly blind infrared powerful source (I just rigged a BOREALIS 1050 lumens flashlight ~2 million candlepower~ with a surplus Israeli jeep infrared filter) the binocular can easily “see” 300 yards away in total darkness.

    The glasses weigh 31 oz., which isn't bad for a binocular that is 6 ¼ long by 6 ½ wide and 1 ¾ thick. The barrels of the objective adjust for focus individually. The adjustment is very smooth and easy to move; likewise, the ocular also has an adjustment that is individual to each eye, and it is not a center focus adjustment wheel, like in regular binoculars.

    The metal screw in caps covering the objectives have a little pin hole to limit the amount of light that will enter if the binoculars are used during the day, which is mostly done to make adjustments for distance and focus previous to the projected night use. Those metal caps are noisy to unscrew or screw them, so if you're using them when game is near, I recommend replacing them with Buttler Creek or similar spring loaded binocular caps.
    The power is supplied by a Lithium 123 3 volts battery that is loaded from the rear where the hinge is in the binoculars. These batteries are more popular than ever, thanks to the amount of tactical flashlights that make use of them.

    This is better than the present problem I have of trying to find a number 1 battery for my Israeli surplus infrared night vision goggle (and by the way, if one of you readers know a source for such battery, please let me know).

    For a first generation unit, the Night Owl 4x Compact is a very good binocular, well thought-out in its design and construction, with rubber covering to make gripping easier and to deaden game spooking noises. When I first bought them my son was 10 years old and interested in watching game, so we spent a few enjoyable nights watching deer eating apples at the tree and watching over a bear bait in upper Maine, just to see what was showing up. To all you fathers out there, those kinds of memories can last a lifetime and tend to be the greatest ones, especially when that same son is now a college student and interested in watching other types of game. ;) So cherish them well.
    Best regards,

    Black Bear
    Builder of the BOREALIS 1050 lumens flashlight


    and www.blackbearflashlights.com

    E-Mail admin@blackbearflashlights.com

  7. #21
    Senior Member Array ridurall's Avatar
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    What I use I consider the hands down best hunting binocular on the market. Mine are Brunton Epoch 8.5 X43. They have a life time HALO warranty that covers anything, even if you run them over with your truck or loose them. They have a 2X attachable spotting scope in a Pelican case with your name engraved on it. I've owned Steiners and Cannon Image stablized binoculars (well still own them) but the Brunton Epoch is the best bino hands down. They are not cheap but well worth it. They retail for around $1500 but can be picked up for about 1/2 that if you do your research.
    Life member NRA since 1983
    I carry a Kimber Ultra Carry II in a Crossbreed SuperTuck. My wife carries a Walther PPS .40 w/Crossbreed holster.

  8. #22
    Member Array PcMakr's Avatar
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    Love my Nikon Monarch ATB 10X42. Mine didn't come with the objective lens covers like yours has, so I have to be very careful about how I use/store them. Haven't come up with a good way to protect them yet. Read an article recently that stated that Nikon has actually been making binocs longer than cameras, and that's been a long time. It's just been in recent years that they have come into the American market and their goal is to match or beat the Europeans in quality at a better price.

  9. #23
    VIP Member Array Supertac45's Avatar
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    Nikon are good optics. I like Steiners.
    Les Baer 45
    Sig Man
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  10. #24
    Senior Member Array ridurall's Avatar
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    I've got a $500 pair of 10X50 Steiners that have a bad flair at 6:00. I didn't realize it until I started looking at stars with them. The Brunton Epochs and my Cannon Stablized binos don't do that. I've never been happy with mt Steiners after that.
    Life member NRA since 1983
    I carry a Kimber Ultra Carry II in a Crossbreed SuperTuck. My wife carries a Walther PPS .40 w/Crossbreed holster.

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