Compasses

Compasses

This is a discussion on Compasses within the Related Gear & Equipment forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; Hi guys, What this thread about compasses is doing in a gun forum? I don't know, I thought it could be of interest since it ...

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Thread: Compasses

  1. #1
    Member Array black bear 84's Avatar
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    Compasses

    Hi guys,
    What this thread about compasses is doing in a gun forum?
    I don't know, I thought it could be of interest since it had a great response in other forums in which I posted it.

    If not, please ignore it

    COMPASSES

    Hi guys,
    The impulse to write this post came with the recent discovery that we live in the midst of a generation so dependent on gadgets (and adept at using them) that they lose, or never discover, the simpler way of doing things.

    I conducted an “antler hunt” in the April spring woods with a group of Boy Scouts of my son’s troop. The plan was to scout the woods during the day and using flashlights at night, employing compasses to coordinate the excursion.
    The group consisted of several boys aged 13 to 16 years, bringing with them a large assortment of electronic equipment. I have to say that they were very excellent at using them, especially the iPods, cell phones, two-way radios, and GPS’s, but they failed miserably in their understanding of the low -tech compass.

    THIS PICTURE SHOWS A VARIETY OF COMPASSES AND TWO GPS’S, THE GARMIN XL12 LT
    AND THE GARMIN E-TREX SUMMIT, AS WELL AS A SUREFIRE AVIATOR FLASHLIGHT.



    I have nothing against GPS’s; as a matter of fact, I use them myself and have a couple that I use often to complement the compass I use.
    After all, the GPS can give you your position (and you can plot this in a map) in any weather and even at night, making it easy to walk cross-country in the woods. However, I am not one of those guys glued to the GPS. After I get my position and course to follow, I put the gadget away and use the compass to get the direction for my trek.

    This is going to be sort of a very short (space limitation) refresher course on how to use the basic base plate compass. Of all the types available, I am going to stick to the Silva system for now, as it is the easiest to understand. They come in several flavors; from the inexpensive less- than-$10, to the more elaborate of $50 or so, but they all do the basic job of guiding you well.

    That I stick to the Silva system doesn’t mean that you have to buy a Silva Compass. The market is full of others brands that use the same base plate system such as Brunton, Suunto, Kasper & Ritcher, etc.
    The mechanics of taking bearings and following directions are very easy. I will try to make them short and understandable, as the scope of this article is only to produce the basics, and should not be considered a treatise in navigation.

    The compass’ needle points to the Magnetic North, not the geographic North, but we only have to compensate for it when we use the compass together with a map.
    For navigation in the woods without a map, this is what you have to do. With the compass in front of you, point the direction-of-travel arrow in the direction you want to go, then rotate the capsule until the magnetic arrow North part (usually red) lies pointing to the letter N (for North) in the capsule. Read the bearing (in degrees) at the junction of the line-of-travel arrow and the capsule. In this case, it is showing 270 degrees, which means that the direction you want to travel in is 270 degrees, or exactly West.

    Now, move your feet and rotate your body (not the compass) until the magnetic needle points to the N. Pick a landmark lying in your direction (West) and walk to it without looking at the compass. When you reach that landmark, reorient your body again, pick another landmark (a tall tree?) and keep walking until you get to your destination.

    When you want to return, don’t change anything on the compass! Move your body, putting the South part of the needle over the “N,” or alternatively, just invert the base plate with the direction-of-travel arrow pointing towards you. Or, if you want to change the setting, just put East as your returning direction in the line-of-travel; that will be 90 degrees in your numbered capsule.

    And to make this explanation as simple as possible, I will explain compass and map together in the next posting.

    All the best
    Black Bear
    Builder of the BOREALIS 1050 lumens flashlight


    and www.blackbearflashlights.com

    E-Mail admin@blackbearflashlights.com


  2. #2
    Member Array black bear 84's Avatar
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    COMPASS AND MAP TOGETHER

    The compass needle points to geographic North only at the agonic line (line of no declination because it is the same as the geographical North line). This line passes now through the west part of Florida and the Great Lakes. My friends in Wisconsin never have to adjust for magnetic declination. I hike and hunt in New York, where I have to adjust for 17 degrees West, and in Maine as much as 22 degrees West. The people on the West coast have to adjust for declination East.
    If you are located over that line, the needle will point geographic North. All other times the magnetic needle points to the magnetic North that is located some 1300 miles from the geographic North.
    Your topographic map will tell you in a diagram found in the left corner how much is the declination in your area. If the map is old, you may have to find the present declination to be more accurate in your traveling if it involves a long trek, where one degree could make a difference.

    Once you found how many degrees of declination you have to adjust for, you can do it on the compass or on the map.

    PICTURE OF A COMPASS WITH INSIDE DECLINATION SCALE



    PICTURE OF A COMPASS WITH AN ADJUSTABLE SCALE, IT MOVES THE LOWER INSIDE DIAL
    BY A GEARED SCREW.

    PICTURE OF A COMPASS WITHOUT A SCALE, IN THIS CASE YOU HAVE TO FIGURE YOUR DECLINATION BY ADDING OR SUBSTRACTING FROM THE 360 DEGREES, IN THIS CASE THE DECLINATION IS 18 WEST, SO THE NEEDLE IS PLACED OVER THE 342 MARKINGS.
    EACH OF THE MARKINGS IS EQUIVALENT AT 2 DEGREES, THERE ARE 180 OF THEM AROUND THE COMPASS.



    ADJUSTING THE MAP
    To make the map speak compass language (magnetic North), extend the line of declination all across the map from the little diagram in the corner, using a long ruler and spacing the lines about two inches. Or use your compass as a protractor (measuring angles) to trace the start of the line from anywhere on the map.
    After doing this, both the compass and the map will “speak” magnetic readings and you will not have to adjust the compass for magnetic declination.

    ADJUSTING THE COMPASS
    If you would rather adjust for declination on the compass (and save yourself from tracing lines on the map), every time you are going to follow a bearing in the field, you have to move the needle to the proper declination. So instead of pointing to North, it will point 22 degrees West of North (in the case of Maine), or 338 degrees.
    Or, if you are West of the agonic line, then your declination will be East and you will have to move the needle East of the North marking on the compass.
    Some compasses have a scale printed in the capsule, and some of them adjust by means of a internal rotating bezel that adjusts with a screwdriver stored in the lanyard. I like the latter type because there is nothing to do after you set it; you just place the needle in the “gate” that is already adjusted to the proper declination after you do it the first time.

    To use the compass and map together, find where you are in the map and where you want to go, connect the two places with a line that extends from the side of your compass, and without moving it, rotate the “capsule” of the compass so that the lines inscribed on the bottom of the capsule combine with your drawn magnetic lines on the map OR the North line(s) or margin on the map if you are adjusting for declination on the compass.

    Just follow the bearing that you have just set at the back end of the “line of travel arrow” and you will arrive at your destination.

    IN THIS PICTURE, A SUUNTOO S5SK IS USED TO CONNECT THE START AND FINISH, ONLY THING TO DO NOW IS ROTATE THE CAPSULE UNTIL THE LINES INSCRIBED IN IT, PARALLEL THE NORTH LINES ON THE MAP, AND READ THE DEGREES AT THE JUNCTION OF THE LINE OF TRAVEL ARROW AND THE BEZEL WITH THE NUMBERS. (DISREGARD THE MAGNETIC NEEDLE WHEN THE COMPASS IS ON THE MAP)



    All this is very basic, but it will take you to the proper destination. If you would like to study map and compass a little more and learn how to navigate using more elaborate techniques, such as using handles, taking triangulation, or navigating in open terrain without the use of landmarks, I recommend you buy one of the books that are available on the subject.

    I started many years ago with the classic “Be Expert with Map & Compass” by Bjorn Kjellstrom, which I recommend, but there are many other books that you can get from places like REI.
    Using Map and Compass by Don Geary
    The Outward Bound Map and Compass handbook by Glenn Randall
    Wilderness Navigation by Bob and Mike Burns

    I hope this little post can help someone interested in navigating the woods by map and compass. I feel that is a great need to go back to the basics to supplement and complement navigation with GPS, that after all, being electronic and depending on batteries can fail us when most needed.

    Best wishes
    Black Bear
    Builder of the BOREALIS 1050 lumens flashlight


    and www.blackbearflashlights.com

    E-Mail admin@blackbearflashlights.com

  3. #3
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    Exclamation Great Write Up

    Excellent write up and explanation of compasses and mapping!



    Thanks!


    The tyrant dies and his rule is over, the martyr dies and his rule begins. ― The Journals of Kierkegaard

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    Excellent post, brings back memories of USAF Survival School back in 1980, pre GPS.

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    Excellent post, thanks BB.

  6. #6
    VIP Member Array Old Chief's Avatar
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    Excellent refresher. I learned to use the compass and map so long ago that it has become second nature to me and I never invested in a GPS. Never thought that I needed to spend my money that was earmarked for more important toys on a gadget that was only nice to have..
    One should never confuse good fortune with good training.
    Illegitimus Non Carborundum.
    In God we trust.

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    VIP Member Array peacefuljeffrey's Avatar
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    I have a very simple compass that I bought at Outdoor Sports World and put on my watch band. (I think it's made by Coghlan's.)

    Nothing fancy, but it helps me know what direction I'm driving, or what direction we're flying for jump run.

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    Uniquely different and interesting post...after 36 years (this weekend), I've learned to STOP and ask for directions...

    During my hunting years (a dozen years ago), I only depended upon a compass, not the fancy GPS systems my buddies used...I always got a deer or two, and I always made it back to camp for dinner...

    Thanks for the post...
    The last Blood Moon Tetrad for this millennium starts in April 2014 and ends in September 2015...according to NASA.

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  9. #9
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    Good stuff, black bear 84. Thanks for posting.

    Map and compass reading is fast becoming a lost art.

    In my timber cruising days, I used a Suunto mirror compass (same as the Silva) and 1:24,000 topo maps. Never needed no stinkin' GPS!


    When you’re wounded and left on Afghanistan’s plains,
    And the women come out to cut up what remains,
    Just roll to your rifle and blow out your brains,
    And go to your God like a soldier.

    Rudyard Kipling


    Terry

  10. #10
    Member Array tk4878's Avatar
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    What a great write up. Last year I went to a land navigation class. You explained it in a easy to understand way that took them 4 hours to do. You can't go wrong with learning the basics. Batteries die, you could drop your gps off a mountain/river etc. Nothing like old school!

  11. #11
    VIP Member Array packinnova's Avatar
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    Excellent writeup. Some co-workers of mine know I'm going on a 4day hike around end of hte month and one actually asked if I was taking a gps so I wouldn't get lost. I responded...What happens if the batteries die or I drop it in the stream crossings (on the order of 20+ on one hike!)? I'll stick to my old compass thanks.
    "My God David, We're a Civilized society."

    "Sure, As long as the machines are workin' and you can call 911. But you take those things away, you throw people in the dark, and you scare the crap out of them; no more rules...You'll see how primitive they can get."
    -The Mist (2007)

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    Great lesson plan. I've been wanting to get a GPS for some time now, but I've got about 10 or 12 compasses so I just keep on using those and keep on putting off getting the GPS.

    I keep a compass in all of my bug out kits, hunting kits, day packs and just about every other type of kit I own. I tend to be a very "modular" thinker, so I have several of everything spread out in different kits.
    -Bark'n
    Semper Fi


    "The gun is the great equalizer... For it is the gun, that allows the meek to repel the monsters; Whom are bigger, stronger and without conscience, prey on those who without one, would surely perish."

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    Hey... that was fun!
    ALWAYS carry! - NEVER tell!

    "A superior Operator is best defined as someone who uses his superior
    judgement to keep himself out of situations that would require a display of his
    superior skills."

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    Senior Member Array DrLewall's Avatar
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    After serving better than 10 years with SAR, we were very efficient with map and compass skills..then GPS came along..now the only time we use the GPS is to confirm our position. Everything we did was UTM, and still is. Great write up!!

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