Gun Safes in the garage

Gun Safes in the garage

This is a discussion on Gun Safes in the garage within the Related Gear & Equipment forums, part of the Defensive Carry Discussions category; I currently have a Rhino Metals 39 gun safe bolted to the floor in my garage, but after reading a few things about rusting guns ...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 25
  1. #1
    New Member Array wh0f4rted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Boise, Idaho
    Posts
    14

    Gun Safes in the garage

    I currently have a Rhino Metals 39 gun safe bolted to the floor in my garage, but after reading a few things about rusting guns I’m getting scared! I have a golden rod in there now and I check it often to make sure it’s hot. My garage is attached to the house, but it still gets pretty cold in the winter time and hot in the summer. It’s a newer house, so the garage is sealed pretty well………anyone have problems with rust in a situation like mine? I’d like to move it into the house, but the lady doesn’t want it in the bedroom and I’m not too excited about moving 1000+lbs of metal….


  2. #2
    Moderator
    Array buckeye .45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    7,682
    Moisture in the air is what is going to cause the majority of your rust problems, so if you keep it dry, and use a dehumidifier, it should keep most of the rust away.

    However, especially if you have firearms with nice wood, I would keep them in a place more temperature controlled. JMO.
    Fortes Fortuna Juvat

    Former, USMC 0311, OIF/OEF vet
    NRA Pistol/Rifle/Shotgun/Reloading Instructor, RSO, Ohio CHL Instructor

  3. #3
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    27,047
    Well, having it bolted to the foundation doesn't mean that the metal of the safe must ride right on the foundation itself, unprotected.

    One method: climate control, of both the air and the floor. Some folks have floors with built-in heating. That would certainly cut almost all the temperature change from infecting the safe's structure.

    You could also build your own heated "floor" out of a section of thick, high-grade marine plywood and the appropriate "heating" coils snaked through its guts.

    Most folks, though, are going to simply have a cement slab, which will go through the full swings in temperature that the outdoors does.

    You might consider using a barrier that can help block much of the temperature swing transmitting the result directly to the steel of the safe. For example, imagine sealing that 4x4' section of concrete, using a 1" sheet of high-quality, marine plywood that's been epoxied "shut," an then topped with a couple sheets of high-grade moisture barrier (plastic) that's used in construction. Placing the safe on this and then bolting it to the foundation can create a decent buffer between the harsh concrete and resulting temperature changes. Won't stop it, but it'll buffer the worst of it from the metal of the safe. If you've got a serious temperature problem, you could even make your own heated plywood "floor" for the safe, much like folks install in homes. Though, I couldn't vouch for the result, given usage in a room without other climate control.

    You could acquire one or two of the "thinner" safes (front to back), for storage in closets. Of course, that'll cut your closet space by quite a bit. Still, that'll bring the units inside to a space that has better temp controls. If you've got a big room in the house, you could even build in a 3ft deep false wall, for that extra "closet" space.

    What I do is predicated on the relatively small temperature swings I have to contend with. It gets cold, here, sure. But, it won't swing from 25*F at night to 80*F during the day, then back again. Very rarely. And, in my home, the concrete is not changing temps very quickly, given the nature of the build. Generally, it stays within a fairly tight temperature range, which cuts down on the moisture production pretty well. I've not noticed any condensation on the outside or inside. I've got a long goldenrod @ 200cuft capacity, a can of silicon gel pellets @ 50cuft capacity, and one of the EVA units @ 30cuft capacity. I recharge the can and the EVA monthly, and they needed it. So, yes, the temp swings are boosting the capture of moisture, but I also am aggressive to protect that ~18cuft interior space with (claimed) 250+ cu.ft. moisture-capturing capacity from the goldenrod + can + EVA. Still, it requires frequent recharging.
    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
    Thoughts: Justifiable self defense (A.O.J.).
    Explain: How does disarming victims reduce the number of victims?
    Reason over Force: The Gun is Civilization (Marko Kloos).
    NRA, SAF, GOA, OFF, ACLDN.

  4. #4
    New Member Array wh0f4rted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Boise, Idaho
    Posts
    14
    I think I will put it on the marine plywood as you suggested for sure. I might even consider an insulated wooden enclosure all around it. I have sold most of my wooden stocked guns and pretty much all I have now is synthetic. My Goldenrod is good for 200 cubic feet, and I think I will get some silica packs and one of those rechargeable dehumidifiers as well. Thanks for the great ideas and keep them coming!

  5. #5
    Senior Member Array Herknav's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Waypoint 0
    Posts
    986
    The wooden enclosure will do double duty by also shielding it from prying eyes if the garage door happens to be open.
    I would rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth.--Steve McQueen

  6. #6
    VIP Member
    Array msgt/ret's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    7,377
    Great suggestions ccw9mm, I too have my safe in a detached garage sitting on four 2X4s and have a heater and two canisters of Sta-Dri inside. Even with the humidity we have here I have had no problems with rust.
    When you have to shoot, shoot. Don't talk.
    "Don't forget, incoming fire has the right of way."

  7. #7
    VIP Member Array varob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,452
    I just ordered a can of silica from Cabelas today.

    I don't have a humidity problem, but I figure it won't hurt.
    Don't believe what you hear and only half of what you see!
    -Tony Soprano

  8. #8
    Moderator
    Array RETSUPT99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    44,786
    My safes are in an A/C controlled room...no problems.
    The last Blood Moon Tetrad for this millennium starts in April 2014 and ends in September 2015...according to NASA.

    ***********************************
    Certified Glock Armorer
    NRA Life Member[/B]

  9. #9
    VIP Member Array Stevew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    3,420
    My safe is in the man cave shop. It is 30 x 70 and made of metal with a concrete floor. Not insulated and not heated. I have two dehumidifiers and a silica can. As long as I don't have rust problems I prefer it that way because I cut back on scope fogging problems. I did put plastice down before pouring the concrete which helps keep moisture from wicking through the concrete.
    Good people do not need laws to tell them to act responsibly, while bad people will find a way around laws. Plato

  10. #10
    VIP Member Array Majorlk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Naugatuck, CT
    Posts
    2,406
    My safe is in the basement, sitting on a sheet of 3/4" plywood and is bolted into the concrete floor and the wall behind the safe. I have a damp chaser plugged in and a room dehumidifier in the basement set for 45 percent.

    There's enough leakage in the ductwork to keep the temp no lower than the mid 50s during the dead of winter.

    No rust, no mildew, no problems.
    An armed society is a polite society. Manners are good when one may have to back up his acts with his life. - Robert A. Heinlein

  11. #11
    VIP Member
    Array shooterX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    2,848
    I use to have my safes out in the garage in our old house, but with the humidity in SC I put them in a closet on the second floor when we moved a few years back. I would to do like my brother did, he built a house and built a conditioned room at the back of his garage for his firearms.

  12. #12
    Member Array Wilson2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Central Alabama
    Posts
    32
    Based on these replies, I think the OP has little to worry about if he takes reasonable precautions. Especially given that he is in Idaho where the humidity is very low.

    Also, be sure to wipe your firearms down every after each use and every few months with a good CLP such as Weaponshield.

  13. #13
    Ex Member Array Ram Rod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Fayetteville, AR
    Posts
    13,687
    The extreme temperature swings would be of major concern to me no matter what form of de-humidifier I was using. Subtle changes are not so much of a worry, but maintenance does play an important role such as how much oil to leave in a bore and things like that. When you know the conditions, you can adapt to them and have little concern. Keeping your safe where it is just means a little more time in maintenance. If your safe is well insulated....treat it like a refrigerator! Don't open the door frequently, or take the toys out to play. That's when the difference in temperatures will take it's toll. Bring one of your firearms in the house after the cold storage pretty much demands wiping it down immediately when it sweats out, then apply preserves when it goes back. Rust, metals, and the environment are a science of their own. Use your common sense, and you'll never see rust on your firearms. With today's exterior finishes, the most important thing is the bores. That's where you have naked metal, and the chrome lined bores won't demand as much care.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Array redbird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Murfreesboro, TN
    Posts
    649
    I have my gunsafe in my mancave/garage it is heated and air conditioned so far no problems with rust.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Array Rmac58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Hopewell, Va
    Posts
    682
    Check the contents periodically, adjust as necessary, but should be okay.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Good: In the garage
    By Ally in forum In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: April 20th, 2010, 02:02 PM
  2. Into the dark garage
    By mercop in forum Carry & Defensive Scenarios
    Replies: 59
    Last Post: March 25th, 2010, 08:10 PM
  3. Garage safes?
    By scorpion12 in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: January 19th, 2010, 05:58 AM
  4. Garage Invasion ? Maybe not ???
    By mi2az in forum Carry & Defensive Scenarios
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: December 15th, 2008, 01:28 AM

Search tags for this page

climate control gun safe
,
climate controlled gun safe
,
garage gun safe
,
gun safe climate control
,
gun safe garage
,
gun safe in a garage
,
gun safe in cold garage
,

gun safe in garage

,
gun safe in garage humidity
,
gun safe in the garage
,
gun safe temperature control
,
gun safes in garage
Click on a term to search for related topics.

» Log in

User Name:

Password:

Not a member yet?
Register Now!

» DefensiveCarry Sponsors