Old Primers

Old Primers

This is a discussion on Old Primers within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; A friend of mine just gave me a bunch of Old Primers he had in his basement. (Cool dry place) I'm interesed in these 9.5 ...

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Thread: Old Primers

  1. #1
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    Old Primers




    A friend of mine just gave me a bunch of Old Primers he had in his basement. (Cool dry place)

    I'm interesed in these 9.5 "Kleanbore" primers. I have searched Google but cannot come up with a firm answer. I think these are LRP not LRMP. I have some newer Remington 9.5 in the Green box towards the bottom and they say Large Rifle Primers, I'm assuming these "Kleanbore primers" are the same just older correct?

    Also, if you look at the White box Winchester primers they say for Standard or Magnum loads. Whats the deal with that?

    I would also be interested in finding out how old these are so I can try and use them with more modern powders such as RAMTAC. I was thinking just using IMR 4895 however, would it matter since the powder is technically new? Any helop would be appreciated.
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    My suggestion is to call the manufacturers and ask them. In my experience, they are interested in helping to prevent accidents.
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    The 9.5 Primers are large rifle primers. Currently they are designated 9 1/2 Primers. 9 1/2M would be for magnum loads. Winchester primers can be used for both standard and magnum loads which is the reason I use them.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ksholder View Post
    My suggestion is to call the manufacturers and ask them. In my experience, they are interested in helping to prevent accidents.
    Here is how Remington Responded:

    Response () 06/28/2011 02:42 PM
    Thank you for visiting Remington Country! We certainly appreciate you taking the time to write in with your question. The shelf life of most ammunition and reloading components is 10 years. I would recommend disposing of the items through your local law enforcement agency and not using the product.

    Now I know everybody says listen to the manfacture, but serisously 10 year on Ammo? Okay so if this was good advice there would be no surplus ammuntion for .06 .223, 7.62 etc..... This is a little over the top. I've seen many folks use primers from the 1970's. Plus the guy I got these from did call one a primer manufacturing company and they said non corressive primers generally do not go bad if stored correctly.
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    I'd happily load them up for range use. I've used primers far older than those seen in that box (and not so long ago...thank you very much) with perfect satisfaction. I've even chronographed loads assembled with such primers to find no large deviation in performance.

    I might go so far as to keep them out of loads assembled for my "serious usin' cartridges" as for hunting or self-defense use but for range work they'd be fine. Just be certain that the box exteriors aren't oil or water stained. I once kept my "ready primers" stowed on the loading bench where I also cleaned my guns. A few misfires got me to investigating potential problems. I noticed a lot of spatter from Hoppe's No. 9 soaked brushes on some of the boxes. Can't see how it would get through to the primers but I moved them. Haven't had trouble for years.

    I love Remington 9 1/2 primers.
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    Quote Originally Posted by automatic slim View Post
    The 9.5 Primers are large rifle primers. Currently they are designated 9 1/2 Primers. 9 1/2M would be for magnum loads. Winchester primers can be used for both standard and magnum loads which is the reason I use them.
    Aye. I use IMR powders exclusively as well. I'd try a small batch of ten reloads with the primers to determine how they would do. Primers last way longer than powder when stored properly. New powder won't make any difference combined with older primers. Ignition is common......either it happens, or it don't. A weak primer is like a 'weak' electric motor (I've always laughed at this when someone says the motor is getting weak).......either it runs, or it don't. No room for in-between. Try the primers in your loads.

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    In a pinch I have used rifle primers in pistol loads,I don't load max loads in my handguns,I have never had any problems,If I'm right I believe rifle primers have a harder cup and in some pistols may not get hit with the firing pin hard enough.
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    Load em up. If storage has been decent they will be fine.
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    I have shot 40 year old ammo with no issues -- fire them up

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    I still have a few 40+ year old primers that I use now and then that go bang every time. Stored correctly the will last many years.
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    Those are NEW primers to me. Most of my reloading is now being done with primers that I bought a number of years ago from Herters. Remember them ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob99VMI04 View Post
    Here is how Remington Responded:

    Response () 06/28/2011 02:42 PM
    Thank you for visiting Remington Country! We certainly appreciate you taking the time to write in with your question. The shelf life of most ammunition and reloading components is 10 years. I would recommend disposing of the items through your local law enforcement agency and not using the product.
    Remington is simply covering themselves, liability wise.
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