Lead Round Nose vs. Lead Conical Nose

This is a discussion on Lead Round Nose vs. Lead Conical Nose within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; I need load data for 125gr Lead Round Nose. It is for my 9mm. The only data I find is for LCN. If I use ...

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Thread: Lead Round Nose vs. Lead Conical Nose

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    Senior Member Array zeppelin03's Avatar
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    Lead Round Nose vs. Lead Conical Nose

    I need load data for 125gr Lead Round Nose. It is for my 9mm. The only data I find is for LCN. If I use the load for LCN will I be alright. It would not be exceeding the starting load or much past it.

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    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    As long as both bullets are lead and the same weight,then the load data is the same for each one
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    Senior Member Array FLSlim's Avatar
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    You didn't specify your powder, but just looking at Lyman 49 there are LRN loads for 120 which would slightly high but close. As dukal.. said, though, you shouldn't run into problems using conical data.
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    Sounds like you're looking at Hodgdon's tables.

    HP-38 perhaps? It works well in my .45 ACP and 9mm Mak loads, so no need in changing powders at this point. I just loaded my first few (15) trial 9mm Meister 125 grn LRNs with 4.0 grns of HP-38. I believe the starting weight is 3.9. I hate odd numbers, so I began with 4.0. They drop into my 6906 chamber cleanly with a distinct "clunk" so should chamber fine. If they cycle okay, I'll probably stick with the low end loads.

    The Hodgdon chart shows a COL of 1.125 but mine end up as 1.118 with the ever-so-slight smidgen of shoulder showing.

    125 grains of lead is pretty much 125 grains of leads regardless of shape. The only difference may be in COL as each bullet shape has its own length, etc.
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    Distinguished Member Array claude clay's Avatar
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    most all manuals show a side drawing of the bullet. come close to matching the weight ( 124/125 ) and look carefully at the base part of the bullet--that which will engage the lands. some bullets have 1, some 2 lube groves. you are interested in matching as closely as possible the area that will touch the lands. this goes to the amount of friction the bullet will have as it travels the barrel.
    more than this and you should be working with a re-load instructor, some one who has years of experience. not just following directions but the deeper understanding of 'why' it works rather than that it does. and perhaps the maker of the bullet can supply you with basic info.

    duk, i say this cause bullets with the same weight may have different bearing surfaces and list different loads. FWIW

    -----------------------
    so i got up and looked: Lymans #49 page 342...2 bullets, each 120 grains, having different formulas.
    but nothing that would cause injury, rather just change POA/POI
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    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by claude clay View Post
    most all manuals show a side drawing of the bullet. come close to matching the weight ( 124/125 ) and look carefully at the base part of the bullet--that which will engage the lands. some bullets have 1, some 2 lube groves. you are interested in matching as closely as possible the area that will touch the lands. this goes to the amount of friction the bullet will have as it travels the barrel.
    more than this and you should be working with a re-load instructor, some one who has years of experience. not just following directions but the deeper understanding of 'why' it works rather than that it does. and perhaps the maker of the bullet can supply you with basic info.

    duk, i say this cause bullets with the same weight may have different bearing surfaces and list different loads. FWIW

    -----------------------
    so i got up and looked: Lymans #49 page 342...2 bullets, each 120 grains, having different formulas.
    but nothing that would cause injury, rather just change POA/POI
    True that is why most load data has a starting powder weight and max,it also specifies Minimum OAL and Maximum,some powders take up enough case space that if the bullet is seated too deep you compress the charge which can also create dangerous pressures,I rarely ever need to load max loads,I try to find a good practice load that shoots accurate.
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    Member Array mauser1959's Avatar
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    Senior Member Array Freedomofchoice's Avatar
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    The only thing I can think of is that because of the different shapes, your seating die may seat the two bullets to different depths. A conical bullet is more likely to be seated to a depth similar to a hollow point.

    If you start at the lowest load level you should be ok. I've been reloading for over 40 years, and didn't own a micrometer until about 5 years ago. I always stick to moderate loads, and I've never experienced a failure of any kind or high pressures with anything I ever loaded.
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    Member Array lee n. field's Avatar
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    Should be OK.

    What powder are you using?

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    Senior Member Array zeppelin03's Avatar
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    I am using titegroup powder.

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    Member Array lee n. field's Avatar
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    Lyman's 48th edition has a listing for 120gr LRN. OAL of 1.450", Tightgroup ranges from 3.8 grain to 4.3 grain.

    That's as close to exactly what you want as my documentation gets.
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    Member Array relsiswb's Avatar
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    Recheck OAL

    Quote Originally Posted by lee n. field View Post
    Lyman's 48th edition has a listing for 120gr LRN. OAL of 1.450", Tightgroup ranges from 3.8 grain to 4.3 grain.

    That's as close to exactly what you want as my documentation gets.
    At 1.45 OAL, would the cartridge even fit in the chamber? The data I have shows an OAL of 1.169 for a round nose bullet.

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    Senior Member Array BamaT's Avatar
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    My 49th Lyman edition shows a 120 grain round nose, bullet # 356242, OAL of 1.065. Looks like the load data has changed. 49th edition Titegroup data for this bullet is 3.2 to 3.8 grains.
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