If I wanted to reload? - Page 2

If I wanted to reload?

This is a discussion on If I wanted to reload? within the Reloading forums, part of the Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics category; Originally Posted by wormy I just started reloading about 6 months ago. I got a lot of recommendations to start with the Lee Anniversary kit. ...

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 39
Like Tree9Likes

Thread: If I wanted to reload?

  1. #16
    Member Array jrizzleP95's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    177
    Quote Originally Posted by wormy View Post
    I just started reloading about 6 months ago. I got a lot of recommendations to start with the Lee Anniversary kit. Its a single stage and includes everything you need to get started. (Except the dies). I got the Lee manual and read it cover to cover. I learned quickly on it and every round Ive done so far has been flawless. Im HOOKED on reloading. Its a great way to get away from the wife.

    Challenger Breech Lock Single Stage Press Anniversary Kit
    this^^
    EDC=Ruger LCP
    Florida CWFL
    NRA Member


  2. #17
    VIP Member Array multistage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    NW Iowa
    Posts
    2,501
    As you can burn up handgun rounds much faster than long gun rounds (usually), most guys I know are running Dillon progressives. I am a rifle guy at heart, and use a single stage rock chucker. I will probably get a Dillon one of these days.
    MrBuckwheat likes this.

  3. #18
    Member Array l1a1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    KY
    Posts
    293
    For What It's Worth - As a new reloader, I would certainly start with a single stage like one from Lee or RCBS. Study and study some more and get a good grasp on the different operations involved in reloading and work up a routine to accomplish those in an efficient, repeatable manner. The Anniversary reloading press from Lee has worked great for me. As you get more into it, you may want to spring for a better scale, powder measure, case trimmer and the like. I prefer to keep it simple and don't deal with any of the progressive setups and even prefer to handle my primers one at a time with no automated feeding system. My output is very low but I think my quality is very high.

  4. #19
    VIP Member
    Array OldVet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Hiding inside a bottle of Jim Beam Black.
    Posts
    17,634
    I endorse learning to reload on a single-stage press or maybe a turret press. They are inexpensive, and if you find reloading is not what you want to do, there's no major investment wasted. While progressives are great for cranking out mountians of ammo, they aren't necessarily the easiest to set up and learn proper techniques on. Once the basics are gained, then if 1000s of rounds per month is the goal, by all means--step up tp a progressive. You can sell your "learning tool" or keep it on hand for the times the progressive breaaks down (they they do).

    I've loaded 1000s of rifle and handgun rounds on my old ('75) Herter's single stage press, and it has never failed to produce quality rounds. I've had one dud (a bad primer), managed to crunch a few cases (it happens), but have never had a double-charge or squib because I individually inspect each and every case for proper powder level, something that might not be so easy on a progressive.

    Reloading is a hobby unto itself. It's great to work up a custom load for your rifle that shoots under 1" groups at 100+ yds! Reloading opens up a whole new world of loads not available commercially.

    The real expense of reloading is the endless costs of powder, prinmers, bullets, neat little accessories you thought you didn't need, etc.
    MrBuckwheat likes this.
    Retired USAF E-8. Lighten up and enjoy life because:
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... Buffalo Springfield - For What It's Worth

  5. #20
    Distinguished Member Array Fitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    So. Central PA
    Posts
    1,875
    I started with a single stage Redding Boss press. Still use it for rifle ammo. I reloaded handgun ammo on it for a while, them bought a 550B. Buddy of mine has the RockChucker Master kit with some stuff added. He also has a Dillon SquareDeal B for handgun ammo.

    If you are only going to load handgun ammo, get the Dillon SquareDeal B and don't look back. If you are going to do both handguns and rifles, get the Dillon 550.

    Fitch
    “The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed (and hence clamorous to be led to safety), by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary.” by H. L. Mencken

  6. #21
    VIP Member Array farronwolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    4,886
    I prefer a turret press for the volume I reload. It is a nice compromise between the expensive progressives and the lower priced single stage.

    I load for about 10 or 12 calibers and elect to leave all the dies preset in the turret and simly swap turrets when changing calibers. It is quick and easy, but yet saves setup time yet you still get the benefit of handling each round at each stage to check quality control so to speak.

    Good luck with your decision.
    Just remember that shot placement is much more important with what you carry than how big a bang you get with each trigger pull.
    www.ddchl.com
    Texas CHL Instructor
    Texas Hunter Education Instructor
    NRA Instructor

  7. #22
    Senior Member Array Chevy-SS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Rhode Island
    Posts
    926
    I used to (about 30 years ago) shoot/practice a lot of IPSC with .45 acp, maybe 1,000 rounds a week. Naturally, I learned to reload mighty fast. I cast my own bullets too. I had my total costs down to about three cents per round, pretty cheap......

    My quickee advice - forget about a single stage press. Get a progressive style machine, something that will let you crank out a few hundred rounds per hour. I used to use a RCBS "Green Machine", which I sold on this forum a few months ago.

    -
    'Be careful, even in small matters' - Miyamoto Musashi

  8. #23
    Distinguished Member Array Elk Hunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,300
    I use the single stage RCBS Rock Chucker. I started reloading ammunition for hunting and then started reloading handgun ammunition. If I had room I would buy a progressive for the handgun ammo. I have also found the cost savings much greater on the .45 vs 9mm. Easier to buy range ammo for the 9mm than reload.
    Last edited by Elk Hunter; January 9th, 2012 at 01:07 PM.
    MrBuckwheat likes this.

  9. #24
    VIP Member
    Array MrBuckwheat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Down Incognito
    Posts
    6,730
    Just bought some Winchester 9mm on sale at Fleet Farm 100 rounds for $18. bucks. I can't reload for that. But I save big money on the 45 and 380 as well as the revolver calibers. Plus you can make some nice custome loads for hunting.

  10. #25
    VIP Member
    Array OldVet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Hiding inside a bottle of Jim Beam Black.
    Posts
    17,634
    Reloading isn't only about savings on ammo; it's a personal satisfaction issue also. I enjoy popping off my homebrewed loads much more than factory ammo, and handloading infinitely opens up the load choices. So if one is only shooting 9mm 115 grn target loads, then reloading isn't going to do much for the wallet. But if shrinking the 1.5" factory loading group in the old .30-06 down to under 1" with a better bullet and powder combo, then reloading is the way to go.
    Last edited by OldVet; January 9th, 2012 at 08:05 PM.
    Retired USAF E-8. Lighten up and enjoy life because:
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... Buffalo Springfield - For What It's Worth

  11. #26
    Senior Member
    Array Blue Thunder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    In the Gun Room
    Posts
    1,027
    I started in the 1970's with a single stage press for pistol. In the 90's I started shooting IPSC and could not get the quality of ammo out of a single stage press with changing dies and wooden blocks to hold everything. Moved to a Dillon SDB and never looked back. Bought a second SDB for Small Pistol Primers (changing primer feeds was time consuming to get it right). I figure I have paid for both several times over and never spent a cent on repairs cause they are warranted for life. I am still using primers from the Clinton Scare back in the 90's. All sits in my off premise storage facility for insurance purposes. You can't go wrong with a Dillon.
    Praise the Lord my Rock, who trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle --- Psalm 144
    NRA Endowment Life
    There are NO Silver Medals for Street Combat
    Blue Thunder, I smell Victory in the Morning!

  12. #27
    Member Array KeythL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    39
    I've been reloading for almost 20 years, my favorite round is .41AE. All good advise read so far. You can't go wrong with a Rock Chucker or Lee single stage starter kit. If you find you like reloading, next add a chronograph(empirical data beats subjective data every time). Then add a nice digital scale...if you're still hooked, get a Dillon 550. I never have to call it a day because I've run out of ammo.

    Stay safe,

    Keyth
    Last edited by KeythL; January 9th, 2012 at 04:52 PM. Reason: typos
    MrBuckwheat likes this.
    Maine CCP
    New Hampshire CCL
    Massachusetts CCL
    Wisconsin CCL

  13. #28
    VIP Member Array Smitty901's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    3,482
    Quote Originally Posted by MrBuckwheat View Post
    Just bought some Winchester 9mm on sale at Fleet Farm 100 rounds for $18. bucks. I can't reload for that. But I save big money on the 45 and 380 as well as the revolver calibers. Plus you can make some nice custome loads for hunting.
    Fleet farm has really stepped up in the firearms market

  14. #29
    VIP Member Array mcp1810's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    5,105
    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    Reloading isn't only about savings on ammo; it's a personal satisfaction issue also. I enjoy popping off my homebrewed loads much more than factory ammo, and handloading infinitely opens up the load choices. So if one is only shooting 9mm 115 grn target loads, then reloading isn't going to do much for the wallet. But if shrinking the 1.5" factory loading group in the old .30-06 down to under 1" with a better bullet and powder combo, then reloading is the way to go.
    +1000 on the satisfaction! I was shooting rifles with a friend of mine one day. He laughed at me when I "missed" with my second shot. We went down range (100 yards) for a closer examination of the target. The look on his face when he realized the hole wasn't quite round was priceless. Factory match ammo is good stuff but it is still mass produced. When you sit down and take the time to measure and trim every case, trickle the powder for each and every round by hand, and do everything as precisely as you can the results can be amazing.
    Infowars- Proving David Hannum right on a daily basis

  15. #30
    Distinguished Member Array Fitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    So. Central PA
    Posts
    1,875
    Quote Originally Posted by mcp1810 View Post
    +1000 on the satisfaction! I was shooting rifles with a friend of mine one day. He laughed at me when I "missed" with my second shot. We went down range (100 yards) for a closer examination of the target. The look on his face when he realized the hole wasn't quite round was priceless. Factory match ammo is good stuff but it is still mass produced. When you sit down and take the time to measure and trim every case, trickle the powder for each and every round by hand, and do everything as precisely as you can the results can be amazing.
    Right on!

    Fitch
    “The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed (and hence clamorous to be led to safety), by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary.” by H. L. Mencken

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

dillon squaredeal diagram

,

lee anniversary kit

,

reload data for .41ae

,

reload data for .45lc for rifle and pistol

,

reloading 9mm with a progressive

,

reloading l1a1 rounds

,

reloading pistol ammo, multi stage or single

,

reloading the .41ae

Click on a term to search for related topics.